Juicy, Airy Spelt Patties / Saftige, Luftige Speltlapper

A Norwegian recipe with spelt found on mills.no
Juicy, Airy Spelt Patties / Saftige, Luftige Speltlapper

These airy and juicy spelt patties makes any Sunday brekfast perfect. If you have a few left over, they are also great for the lunchbox. They stay nice and juicy over time. The recipe gives about 16 patties.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge breakfast_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Advertisements

Rice Patties made with Porridge Leftovers / Rislapper av Risgrøt

A recipe for delicious rice patties found on mills.no
Rice Patties made with Porridge Leftovers / Rislapper av Risgrøt

There is no reason to throw away the remains of the rice porridge, because tit can be transformed into these lovely rice patties. Make them for breakfast or an evening meal and server with your favorite spread. The recipe makes about 12 patties.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge norwegian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Norwegian Potato Patties / Potetlapper

A traditional Norwegian potato recipe found on frukt.no
Norwegian Potato Patties / Potetlapper

These potato patties are very easy to make and can be used for a lot of different kind of meals. For breakfast, lunch, dinner, dessert, hiking food or an evening meal. And you can spread them with just about anything.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge potatorecipes000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Crab Patties / Krabbekaker

A modernised version of the classic Norwegian
crab patties found on
 godfisk.no

Crab Patties / Krabbekaker

Crabs live on the bottom of the sea, from shallow beach areas down to 300-400 meter / 1000-1300 feet depth. In Norway, it is usually found as deep down to 50 meter / 165 feet and in areas with a lot of stones. Fall is the main season for catching a crab here. Then the crab are at their best, with plenty of meat in the shells and a delicious white meat in the claws.

Crab meat has been used to make patties like this in Norway for a long time. This recipe on the other hand they have been modernized via Eastern cuisines.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Cottage Cheese and Corn Patties / Cottage cheese– og Maispletter

A lunch recipe from “Mett På En Litt Sunnere Måte” (Satisfied
in a little healtier way) a free E-booklet published by
 tine.no

Cottage Cheese and Corn Patties / Cottage cheese– og Maispletter

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge lunch000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Thai Fish Cakes / Thai Fiskekaker

A spicy fish cake recipe found on yourhomemagazine.co.uk
Thai Fish Cakes / Thai Fiskekaker

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Flavourful Hash / Smakfull Pytt-i-Panne

A lunch recipe found in “Cooking for a Man”
published by Heublein in 1953

Flavourful Hash / Smakfull Pytt-i-Panne

The third recipe from the fifties for the day, moving from breakfast to lunch now. This recipe can be baked in the oven or fried as patties and served as open-face sandwiches on toast.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge lunch000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Salmon Burgers on Potato Patties / Grove Laksekarbonader på Potetlapper

A delicious salmon recipe found on rema.no
Salmon Burgers on Potato Patties / Grove Laksekarbonader på Potetlapper

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge lunch000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Patties on Farmhouse Bread / Karbonader på Landbrød

A breafast/lunch recipe found on gilde.no
Patties on Farmhouse Bread / Karbonader på Landbrød

Patties on farmhouse bread with mozzarella, red onion,
tomato, basil, pesto and fried eggs.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge breakfast_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Boxty – Traditional Irish Potato Cakes / Tradisjonelle Irske Potetkaker

A traditional Irish recipe found on irishcentral.com
Boxty – Traditional Irish Potato Cakes / Tradisjonelle Irske Potetkaker

Traditional Irish potato cakes, or boxty, are mostly associated with the north midlands of Ireland in Connacht and Ulster. The people of Mayo, Sligo, Donegal, Fermanagh, Longford, Leitrim and Cavan are particularly big fans of this delicious and simple style of potatoes.

It is thought that boxty dates back to the days or the Irish famine, presumably to make the potatoes stretch further. There are a couple of different recipes, but all contain finely grated, raw potatoes served fried.

Over the last couple of years, as the Irish have become more interested in their own cuisine, the popularity of boxty has risen. It’s now quite normal to see boxty on a menu in a restaurant in Ireland, whereas a decade ago it would have still been considered a ‘peasant dish.’ However, boxty has always been popular as part of Irish home cooking as one traditional (if woefully out-dated) rhyme explains:

Boxty on the griddle,
Boxty in the pan,
If you can’t make boxty,
You’ll never get your man.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge irish_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

A spicy pattie recipe found in “New Fashion Plates for
Your Menu” published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932

Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

Creole Cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana, United States which blends French, Spanish, Indian, Caribbean, Portuguese, Greek, Canarian, West African, Amerindian, German, Italian and Irish influences, as well as influences from the general cuisine of the Southern United States.

Creole cuisine revolves around influences found in Louisiana from populations present in Louisiana before the sale of Louisiana to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny_thumb[1]traditional badge ethnic speciality_flat_thumb[1]000_norway_recipe_marker_ny_thumb[1]

Maakouda – Traditional Moroccan Potato Patties / Tradisjonelle Marokkanske Potetkaker

A traditional North African potato recipe found on
then called food.about.com now called dotdash.com

Maakouda – Traditional Moroccan Potato Patties / Tradisjonelle Marokkanske Potetkaker

Pan-fried potato cakes (maakouda batata) are a much-loved street food in Morocco, but you’ll also find them prepared at home. This is a traditional version of the patties, made from a mixture of mashed potatoes, garlic, spices and herbs. Zesty seasoning makes all the difference, so don’t be afraid to taste as you go and add some cayenne pepper or notch up the garlic a bit.

Once the patties are shaped, they’re given a dip in egg and flour before heading for the oil. Some Moroccans will dip them in a fritter batter instead.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Potato Patties / Potetpletter

A classic Scandinavian lunch/dinner recipe found in “Cappelens
Kokebok” (Cappelen’s Cook Book ) published in 1995
Potato Patties / Potetpletter

Patties made of fried grated uncooked potatoes are cheap and delicious food that has a long tradition in Scandinavia. With the grating dish on a food processor you grate the potatoes in no time. Serve the potato patties right from the frying pan with fried crisp bacon, coleslaw ,and of course, cranberry jam.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Medieval Monday – Salmon Cakes / Laksekaker

A medieval fish patties recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmon Cakes / Laksekaker

These fish cakes are based on the osterhlaf (a seafood loaf). Salmon is mentioned by Ælfric (an English abbot, and prolific writer who lived around 955 to 1010) but other fish could be used. These are individual patties rather than one large loaf which is difficult to manage cooking on a modern cooker. The oatmeal gives them a light crunchy texture, quite different from fish cakes made with potato.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

A 13th Century Arabic pattie recipe found on “Let Hem Boyle
A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

Saara who runs ‘Let Hem Boyle’  writes: This is the recipe that was used by Sayyid Abu al-Hasan and others in Morocco, and they called it isfîriyâ.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny