Frankfurter Pie / Pølsepai

A sausage pie recipe found in “Minikokebok – Pølser”
(Mini Cook Book – Sausages) a booklet published by
the Norwegian Information Office for Meat

Frankfurter Pie / Pølsepai

Norwegians are crazy about sausages of any kind so that we got
recipes here for frankfurter pie should in no way surprise anyone – Ted

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Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

A pie recipe from “Cocnut – Sun-Sweetness From The Tropics”
published by Franklin Baker Company in 1928

Coconut Butterscotch Pie / Kokos- og Smørkaramellpai

Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients are part of some recipes, such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt. The earliest known recipes in the middle 19th century used treacle (molasses) in place of or in addition to sugar.

Butterscotch is similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce, made of butterscotch and cream, is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used more specifically of the flavour of brown sugar and butter together, even where the actual confection butterscotch is not involved, such as in butterscotch pudding.

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“Open Sasame” Pie / “Open Sasame” Pai

A recipe from an ad showing a $25,000 winner
at the Pillsbury 1955 Bakeoff

“Open Sasame” Pie / “Open Sasame” Pai

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Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

A meatless pie recipe from the Tudor era
found at historyextra.com

 Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, a vegetable pie from the Tudor era.

Sam writes: This 1596 recipe for a “pie of bald meats [greens] for fish days” was handy for times such as Lent or Fridays when the church forbade the eating of meat (another similar recipe is called simply Friday Pie). Medieval pastry was a disposable cooking vessel, but in the 1580s there were great advancements in pastry work. Pies became popular, with many pastry types, shapes and patterns filled with everything from lobster to strawberries. This pie’s sweet/savoury combo is typical of Tudor cookery. I enjoyed it, but was glad I’d reduced the sugar content.

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“Magic Crystals" Banana Cream Pie / "Magic Crystals" Pai med Banankrem

A pie recipe from an ad for Carnation published in April 1956“Magic Crystals" Banana Cream Pie / "Magic Crystals" Pai med Banankrem

At last-a LIGHT banana cream pie! The secret is CARNATION – the “Magic Crystals” INSTANT!

Never before a banana cream pie so light, so tender. Light in calories, too. The secret is “Magic Crystals” that burst into fresh milk flavor, without heavy fat. Even the luscious topping is whipped Carnation Instant Nonfat Milk. Delicious for drinking, too-nutritious, with all the protein, all the calcium and B-vitamins of fresh, whole milk. Discover the only “Magic Crystals” Instant-Carnation. Use the coupon below, today.

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Chocolatetown Pie / Chocolatetown Pai

A pie recipe found in “Hershey’s Make It Chocolate”
published in 1987

Chocolatetown Pie / Chocolatetown Pai

Go explore the many wonders of chocolate  at the first Hershey Chocolate World. Attraction located in Chocolatetown, USA – Hershey, Pennsylvania!

Note! If you add burbon to the recipe you got a  Derby Pie

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Cooky Sundae Pie / Iskrempai

A recipe from an ad for Gold Medal Flour published
in the 1960 June edition of LIFE magazine
Cooky Sundae Pie / Iskrempai

Betty Crocker’s recipes and her flour – Gold Medal – give youan extra meaure of confidence … they’re both “kitchen tested” just for you!

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Tomato-Mushroom Chicken Pot Pie / Tomat, Sopp og Kyllingpai

A classic comfort food recipe found on
betterhomesandgardens.com

Tomato-Mushroom Chicken Pot Pie / Tomat, Sopp og Kyllingpai

Pot pie is the ultimate comfort food. With switched-up ingredients and a creative twist, you  elevate this classic from familiar to fabulous.

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The History of Pies

The need for nutritious, easy-to-store, easy-to-carry, and long-lasting foods on long journeys, in particular at sea, was initially solved by taking live food along with a butcher or cook. However, this took up additional space on what were either horse-powered treks or small ships, reducing the time of travel before additional food was required. This resulted in early armies adopting the style of hunter-foraging.

The introduction of the baking of processed cereals including the creation of flour, provided a more reliable source of food. Egyptian sailors carried a flat brittle bread loaf of millet bread called dhourra cake, while the Romans had a biscuit called buccellum.

The History of PiesDuring the Egyptian Neolithic period or New Stone Age period, the use of stone tools shaped by polishing or grinding, the domestication of plants and animals, the establishment of permanent villages, and the practice of crafts such as pottery and weaving became common. Early pies were in the form of flat, round or freeform crusty cakes called galettes consisting of a crust of ground oats, wheat, rye, or barley containing honey inside. These galettes developed into a form of early sweet pastry or desserts, evidence of which can be found on the tomb walls of the Pharaoh Ramesses II, who ruled from 1304 to 1237 BC, located in the Valley of the Kings. Sometime before 2000 BC, a recipe for chicken pie was written on a tablet in Sumer.

The History of PiesAncient Greeks are believed to have originated pie pastry. In the plays of Aristophanes (5th century BC), there are mentions of sweetmeats including small pastries filled with fruit. Nothing is known of the actual pastry used, but the Greeks certainly recognized the trade of pastry-cook as distinct from that of baker. (When fat is added to a flour-water paste it becomes a pastry.) The Romans made a plain pastry of flour, oil, and water to cover meats and fowls which were baked, thus keeping in the juices. (The covering was not meant to be eaten; it filled the role of what was later called puff paste.) A richer pastry, intended to be eaten, was used to make small pasties containing eggs or little birds which were among the minor items served at banquets.

The History of PiesThe 1st-century Roman cookbook Apicius makes various mentions of recipes which involve a pie case. By 160 BC, Roman statesman Marcus Porcius Cato (234–149 BC), who wrote De Agri Cultura, notes the recipe for the most popular pie/cake called placenta. Also called libum by the Romans, it was more like a modern-day cheesecake on a pastry base, often used as an offering to the gods. With the development of the Roman Empire and its efficient road transport, pie cooking spread throughout Europe.

Pies remained as a staple of traveling and working peoples in the colder northern European countries, with regional variations based on both the locally grown and available meats, as well as the locally farmed cereal crop. The Cornish pasty is an adaptation of the pie to a working man’s daily food needs.

Medieval cooks had restricted access to ovens due to their costs of construction and need for abundant supplies of fuel. Pies could be easily cooked over an open fire, while partnering with a baker allowed them to cook the filling inside their own locally defined casing. The earliest pie-like recipes refer to coffyns (the word actually used for a basket or box), with straight sealed sides and a top; open-top pies were referred to as traps. The resulting hardened pastry was not necessarily eaten, its function being to contain the filling for cooking, and to store it, though whether servants may have eaten it once their masters had eaten the filling is impossible to prove. This may also be the reason why early recipes focus on the filling over the surrounding case, with the partnership development leading to the use of reusable earthenware pie cases which reduced the use of expensive flour.

The History of Pies

The first reference to “pyes” as food items appeared in England (in a Latin context) as early as the 12th century, but no unequivocal reference to the item with which the article is concerned is attested until the 14th century (Oxford English Dictionary sb pie).

The History of PiesSong birds at the time were a delicacy and protected by Royal Law. At the coronation of eight-year-old English King Henry VI (1422–1461) in 1429, “Partryche and Pecock enhackyll” pie was served, consisting of cooked peacock mounted in its skin on a peacock-filled pie. Cooked birds were frequently placed by European royal cooks on top of a large pie to identify its contents, leading to its later adaptation in pre-Victorian times as a porcelain ornament to release of steam and identify a good pie.

The Pilgrim fathers and early settlers brought their pie recipes with them to America, adapting to the ingredients and techniques available to them in the New World. Their first pies were based on berries and fruits pointed out to them by the Native North Americans. Pies allowed colonial cooks to stretch ingredients and also used round shallow pans to literally “cut corners” and to create a regional variation of shallow pie.

Text from Wikipedia

Medieval Monday – Doucetes

A pie recipe from the fifitenth century found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday – Doucetes

Original recipe

Take Cream a good cupful & put it in a strainer; then take yolks of Eggs & put thereto, & a little milk; then strain it through a strainer into a bowl; then take Sugar enough & put thereto, or else honey for default of Sugar, then color it with Saffron; then take thine coffins & put in the oven empty & and let them be hardened; then take a dish fastened on the Baker’s peel’s end; & pour thine mixture into the dish & from the dish into the coffins & when they do rise well, take them out & serve them forth.

Take a thousand eggs or more, I Volume,
Harleian MS. 279, c. 1420

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French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

A classic French baking recipe found in”French Cooking”
published by Golden Apple in 1986

French Apple Pie / Fransk Eplepai

If you’re looking to try to get your hands dirty with some
classic French baking, why not start with this pie.

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Corn Pie / Maispai

A tasty pie recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter”
(Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishes) published by
Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Corn Pie / Maispai

A pie with an American touch since corn is not the most common ingredient in pies here in Scandinavia.

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Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

A pie recipe found in “Best Casseroles to Make”
published by Woman’s Day in 1973

Cheese Pie With Bacon / Ostepai Med Bacon

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Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

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Cherry-Raspberry Pie / Kirsebær og Bringebær Pai

A summery pie recipe found in “Better Homesand Gardens’ Gifts From Your Kitchen” published in 1976
Cherry-raspberry-pie_thumb2

Pies are perfect for bringing to family picnics or other gatherings. Everybody loves them and they are not that hard to make. A mug of custard would not be a miss along with this pie as so many others.

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