Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

A soup recipe found in “Flavours of Hungary Recipes”
a free E-book publiched by the Hungarian
Agricultural Marketing Centre in 2009Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

Proper ingredients are necessary but not sufficient for full success. The Hungarian “art de la table” does not only cover the ingredients but also the method of preparation. The special flavours of the traditional Hungarian cuisine are produced by the combination of tasty ingredients of excellent quality with their specific mode of preparation.

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Grilled Smoked Pork with Sauce / Grillkasseler med Sås

A quick dinner recipe found in “God Mat på en Halv
Timme” (Nice Food in Half an Hour) published by 
Alt om Mat in 1974Grilled Smoked Pork with Sauce / Grillkasseler med Sås

Smoked pork is delicious and often used summer food in Scandinavia.
This little recipe has been simplified, but it is undoubtedly an advantage
if the meat can stay a while in the “marinade” to pick up flavour.

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Pork Tenderloin Medallions / Indrefiletmedaljonger av Svin

A dinner recipe found in “Edelmiddag”
en gratis E-booklet published by Gilde.no

Pork Tenderloin Medallions / Indrefiletmedaljonger av Svin

The plates on the pictures in this booklet are divided into two.
The top section shows various juicy and tasty dishes made with pork. The bottom part shows various types of exciting accessories
that taste very well with the pork.

Top: Pork Tenderloin Medallions
Bottom: Couscous Salad

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Pork Chops in Tarragon Sauce / Koteletter i Estragonsaus

An exciting recipe for pork chops found in “Svinekjøtt” (Pork)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Pork Chops in Tarragon Sauce / Koteletter i Estragonsaus

I take it you followed the advice from two posts back and packed your lunch and went outdoors. If you did you deserve a really good dinner, so why not try this delicious recipe for pork chops.

Ted
Winking smile

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Babi Kecap – Balinese Pork Fillet in Soy Sauce / Balinesisk Svinefilet i Soyasaus

A pork recipe found in “Cappelens Internasjonale kjøkken – Indonesia” (Cappelen’s International Kitchen – Indonesia)
published in 1994

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Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colourful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavour. It is diverse, in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 17,508 in the world’s largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia home. Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences. Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important. Indonesia’s cuisine may include rice, noodle and soup dishes in modest local eateries to street-side snacks and top-dollar plates.

In 2011, Indonesian cuisine began to gain worldwide recognition, with three of its popular dishes make it to the list of ‘World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods (Readers’ Pick)’, a worldwide online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International. Rendang top the list as the number one, followed closely by nasi goreng in number two, and satay in number fourteen.

Indonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences. Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. The cuisines of Eastern Indonesia are similar to Polynesian and Melanesian cuisine. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.

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Thit Heo Tau – Pork Boiled in Coconut Milk / Svinekjøtt Kokt i Kokosmelk

A mild Vietnamese dinner recipe found in
“Asia – En Kulinarisk reise”
(A Culinary Voyage)
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Vietnamese food has a characteristic mild taste. In this classic recipe, coconut milk is used to make a creamy sauce that is just added sugar, nuoc mam (fish sauce) and white pepper.

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Roast Pork Tenderloin with Tropical Sauce / Helstekt Svinefilet med Tropisk Saus

A dinner recipe with a touch of the tropics found in “Minikokeboken – Svinekjøtt Spennende og Enkelt”
(The Mini Cook Book – Pork Exciting and Simple)
published by the Norwegian Information Office for Meat

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Tropical Sauce / Helstekt Svinefilet med Tropisk Saus

Pork tenderloin is one of the easiest, most relaxed cuts of meat to cook for dinner. The tenderloin comes from the loin of the pig, which runs from the hip to the shoulder. The tenderloin itself is sometimes also called a pork “fillet,” and it is one of the tenderest cuts of meat on the animal, since it is not a muscle that receives much if any exercise.

This means that the tenderloin is usually a little more expensive than cuts of meat that need longer cooking, like the loin proper or pork butt (shoulder). It also means that it can be cooked quickly and easily, with no brining or braising needed.

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Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

A medieval Roman recipe found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

This recipe illustrates the Roman love of dishes that could be dipped into sauces. A vast array dishes could be served in bowls and platters. Meat would be carved into small pieces, so that each guest only picks what he needs and dips the meat into the accompanying sauces served in little bowls.

The meat would be cooked over a raised brick hearth, on top of which was a charcoal fire. The meat was placed in a pan on a tripod placed over the fire or cooked directly on a grid. Also used were frying pans (pensa), deeper pans (patella and patina), mixing bowls (mortaria) with a spout for pouring.

The recipe given here is not meant to be cooked in a modern kitchen but on an open fire or on a charcoal grill. Roman cooks judged quantities by eye so measurements are not given. Apicius provides the ingredients for the sauce, this then accompanies pan- fried meat.

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Traditional Danish Cold Potato Salad with Frikadells / Kold Kartoffelsalat med Frikadeller

A traditional Danish lunch/dinner recipe
found on
 familiejournal.dk
Traditional Danish Cold Potato Salad with Frikadells / Kold Kartoffelsalat med Frikadeller

Cold potato salad with frikadells is a nice old-fashioned Danish dish
that can be enjoyed by everyone.

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Grated Potato Balls and Smoked Pork Knuckle / Raspeball med Røkt Svineknoke

Traditional Norwegian grub at its best. Recipe found on godt.no
Grated Potato Balls and Smoked Pork Knuckle / Raspeball med Røkt Svineknoke

It’s the same if you call the grated balls Komle, Potetball or Klubb; This is cheap and delicious Norwegian traditional food.

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Faggots and Mushy Peas / Faggots og Mushy Peas

A classic pub-grub recipe found on Picture Britain
Faggots and Mushy Peas / Faggots og Mushy Peas

Abigail Rogers Young who runs Picture Britain writes: This would be one of those snigger-behind-your-hand British/American language differences. I’m sure that you Brits simply live for the look on your American friends’ faces when you say, “Oh yes, we’re having faggots and mushy peas for lunch. Oh, some mash as well, and we’ll cover the whole thing in gravy!”

This traditional British dish (also known as “savoury ducks”) seems to have been concocted for the purpose of using up absolutely every part of a pig that you would never eat otherwise, and was especially popular with the rationing of World War II. The “good old-fashioned way” to make faggots is with a pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavoring, and sometimes bread crumbs. The mixture is shaped into balls, wrapped with caul fat (the omentum membrane from the pig’s abdomen), and baked. Tasty, innnit?

So, my non-British friends, if you want to impress your dinner guests with your expertise in international cuisine, really make them wonder, or just want to gross them out, here is the recipe for British faggots (and please don’t forget the marrowfat peas!).

I have eaten this dish for lunch at countless pubs all over the UK and
can assure you that it’s infinitely more tasty than it sounds like. But I’m
Norwegian and we eat a lot of strange things here as well

Ted
Winking smile

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Medieval Monday – Brawune Fryes

A 15th century pork recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday - Brawune Fryes

saara_thumb11_thumbSaara who runs Let Hem Boyle writes on the blog: This blog is all about historical cooking, mainly focusing on the medieval and renaissance periods. I hope you’ll get inspired and see that cooking is fun and easy. The modernized recipes are only my suggestions, so feel free to try out and make your own! This blog and material is in English and in Finnish. Check out the upper bar of this page! You can find all the recipes there 🙂 enjoy!

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Pork, Plum And Sage Pasties / Svinekjøtt, Plomme og Salvie Paier

A great picnic recipe found on TescoRealFood
Pork, Plum And Sage Pasties / Svinekjøtt, Plomme og Salvie Paier

The time for picnics is really back again here in Norway, this week has almost been to hot for comfort. That means it’s time to make fresh lemonade, bake pastries, make sandwiches and get the picnic baskets out of the cupboards and head for a nice park or the woods. Marvelous way to share a meal if you ask me – Ted

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Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

A quickly cooked dinner found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

Hungarian bean soup is filling dinner and it is cooked in no time.

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Pumpes – Meat Balls / Kjøttboller

A historic dinner recipe found on CookItPumpes – Meat Balls / Kjøttboller

The original recipe:

‘Take fayre buttys of vele and hewe hem,and grnd hem,and wyth eyroun(eggs); caste powder pepyr, gyngere, safroun, galingal and herbes also raysonys of coraunce. Sethe in a pan wyth fayre water. Than putte it on a spete round and lete hem rosty. Serve hem forth.’

Pommeaulx (abridged)

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