Meat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious hearty meat soup recipe found on matprat.no
the soup councilMeat Soup with Oatmeal / Kjøttsuppe med Havregryn

A delicious, hearty soup with game meat or beef for cold autumn and winter evenings. The soup can advantageously be made a day in advance so the flavors can develop.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Potato Pancakes with Crispy Bacon / Potetkaker med Sprøstekt Flesk

A great breakfast recipe found in “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Potetkaker med sptøstekt flesk_post

A simple mixture of potatoes and onions, here transformed into airy potato pancakes with a “crown” of crispy bacon. A lovey smell will spread in the kitchen while you cook them!

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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The Goat Curry in William Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair” / Geitekarrien i William Thackerays “Forfengelighetens Marked”

A hot curry recipe found on theguardian.comThe goat curry in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair_post

“Give Miss Sharp some curry, my dear,” said Mr. Sedley, laughing. Rebecca had never tasted the dish before. “Do you find it as good as everything else from India?” said Mr. Sedley. “Oh, excellent!” said Rebecca, who was suffering tortures with the cayenne pepper. “Try a chili with it, Miss Sharp,” said Joseph, really interested. “A chili,” said Rebecca, gasping. “Oh yes!” She thought a chili was something cool, as its name imported, and was served with some. “How fresh and green they look,” she said, and put one into her mouth. It was hotter than the curry; flesh and blood could bear it no longer. She laid down her fork. “Water, for Heaven’s sake, water!” she cried.

Fra “Vanity Fair” av William Makepeace Thackeray

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Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

A pie recipe from The Second World War  found on historyextra.com
WWII Homity Pie / WWII Homity Pai

No one knows where the name for Homity Pie originates from but the dish was popular with land girls during the Second World War. As well as unrationed items, the recipe also includes rationed foods like cheese, eggs and butter – the original recipe would have used these frugally. Nowadays we don’t have to be so sparing with the cheese and butter, which only make it even tastier.

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates homity pie – a hearty, vegetarian dish popular during the Second World War.

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In Contex

The Land Girls

The Women’s Land Army (WLA) was a British civilian organisation created during the First and Second World Wars so women could work in agriculture, replacing men called up to the military. Women who worked for the WLA were commonly known as Land Girls. The name Women’s Land Army was also used in the United States for an organisation formally called the Woman’s Land Army of America.

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In effect the Land Army operated to place women with farms that needed workers, the farmers being their employers.

Second World War

As the prospect of war became increasingly likely, the government wanted to increase the amount of food grown within Britain. In order to grow more food, more help was needed on the farms and so the government started the Women’s Land Army in June 1939.

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The majority of the Land Girls already lived in the countryside but more than a third came from London and the industrial cities of the north of England.

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In the Second World War, though under the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, it was given an honorary head – Lady Gertrude Denman. At first it asked for volunteers. This was supplemented by conscription, so that by 1944 it had over 80,000 members. The WLA lasted until its official disbandment on 21 October 1949.

Land girls were also formed to supply New Zealand’s agriculture during the war. City girls from the age of 17 and up were sent to assist on sheep, cattle, dairy, orchard and poultry properties.

In popular culture

The Women’s Land Army was the subject of:

Frikassé On Smoked Pork Knuckle / Frikassé På Røkt Svineknoke

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Frikase på røkt svineknoke - Real husmannskost_post

This traditional Norwegian dish is incredibly delicious winter food! Pork knuckle is very easy to prepare and if you cook the knuckle the night before you’ll use max 20 minutes to cook this delicious dinner.

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BBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

A quick and simple foil pack recipe found on tasteofhome.com
headingBBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

Aluminium foil is an absolute must when packing for a camping hike. Whether you packed a small gas cooker or you plan to do all your cooking on the campfire the foil will provide an easy and carefree way to prepare hot food. More recipes using foil will follow in this series – Ted  🙂

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Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A quick and easy potato recipe found in “Woman’s Day Best Casseroles To¨Make” published in 1973
Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A great way to use up leftovers and very versatile. Quick and easy comfort food. Serve the potatoes with a salad and meat leftovers for a great meal.

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Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

A spicy Jamaican curry recipe found on foodandwine.com
Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

Jamaican curry powder is typically a blend of turmeric, cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, anise seeds, allspice and fenugreek. This flavorful chicken dish requires little hands-on prep time.

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Fried Trout With Cucumber Salad And Crème Fraîche Sauce / Stekt Fjellørret Med Agurksalat Og Crème Fraîchesaus

A great dish full of sweet memories found on alleoppskrifter.no
Fried Trout With Cucumber Salad And Crème Fraîche Sauce / Stekt Fjellørret Med Agurksalat Og Crème Fraîchesaus

I grew up on this dish, with sour cream sauce, not crème fraîche sauce though. No one knew what crème fraîche was round this neck of the woods back in the fifties and early sixties.

Both my mom and dad was eager anglers, so they headed for the montains every autumn and retured with trout enough to last us till well into the early summer. My granny, one of the bats ;-), came to take care of my sister and me while they were away – Ted

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Blandaball / Mixed Balls

A Norwegian fish speciality found in “God Mat Fra Sjøen”
(Great Food From The Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984
Blandaball / Mixed Balls

This dish from Western Norway is for many, I must admit an acquired taste. My x-wife’s mother used to serve it quite often and quite honestly, it took me some time to appreciate it. Mixing ground fish, onion and potatoes may seem like a strange thing to do, but when you get used to it, it actually is quite delicious – Ted

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Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

A typical dinner recipe from “God Og Billig Hverdagsmat”
(Nice And Inexpensive Everyday Food)
published  by N W Damm & Sønn in 1955

Meatloaf Fifties Style / Femtitalls Kjøttbrød

There is a delightful simplicity to the recipes in this book, completely free of all the show off vanity one finds in particularly cook books from the late eithties and early nineties.

This is straightforward everyday food presented simply and honestly, just like the Scandinavian fifites themselves. The recipe is from one of my mother’s cook books, now mine, and I’m very fond of it – Ted

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Pakoras – Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

A classic indian potato snack recipe found on madogbolig.dk
Pakoras - Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

Everyone who love Indian food loves pakoras, and if you have not yet tasted this exotic potato dish, then you may just as well start now!

If you are tired of boiled or baked potatoes, then it is time to try this Indian potata dish. Pakoras are slices of baking potatoes wrapped in a batter of chickpea flour, coriander, chili and garlic and deep-fried.

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