Scottish Heather Honey Sponge / Skotsk Lynghonningpudding

A traditional Scottish dessert recipe found on BBC Food
Scottish Heather Honey Sponge / Skotsk Lynghonningpudding

There’s nothing to compare to the light, fluffy texture of a steamed sponge pudding. Golden syrup is a classic addition, of course, but you will love this version, which makes the most of the fragrant flavour of Scottish heather honey. Any other well-flavoured honey will work well too.

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Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Company
in the 1930s

Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A delicious baked dessert sweetened with sugar, maple syrup or honey.

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Caramel Pudding / Karamellpudding

A dessert recipe found in “Condenced Milk and
its use in Good Cookery” published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1927

Caramel Pudding / Karamellpudding

A nifty way to make caramel pudding, but it takes two and a half hour. On the other hand there is hardly any work involved at all. Just checking the water level in the saucepan from time to time.

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Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

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Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

An 18th centure dessert recipe found on evolutionarypie.com
Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs https://revolutionarypie.com writes: John Campbell Loudoun’s apple pudding recipe first caught my eye because it was written in verse. A rarity today, rhyming recipes were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when they were supposedly used by housewives to help them remember recipes. Loudoun’s poem, attributed to him by Kristie Lynn and Robert Pelton, authors of The Early American Cookbook, is much older, dating back to the 18th century.

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17th Century Quaking Pudding / Skjelvende Pudding fra det 17ende Århundre

Some content on this page was disabled on April 6, 2017 as a result of a DMCA takedown notice from Kim Connor. You can learn more about the DMCA here:

https://en.support.wordpress.com/copyright-and-the-dmca/

Colostrum Pudding / Råmelkspudding

A traditional Norwegian farmhouse dessert recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no
Colostrum Pudding / Råmelkspudding

Here is a traditional Norwegian recipe from Upper Sogndalen Country Women Society. In the old days colostrum pudding was a dessert always served after calving. Today there is hardly dairy farmers left in Upper Sogndalen. It does not matter if it’s not the first milking, the pudding sets, and it pudding freezes well.

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19th Century Excellent Potato Pudding / 1800talls Utmerket Potetpudding

Some content on this page was disabled on April 6, 2017 as a result of a DMCA takedown notice from Kim Connor. You can learn more about the DMCA here:

https://en.support.wordpress.com/copyright-and-the-dmca/

Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding / Gammeldags Sagogrynpudding

A classic dessert pudding recipe found on food.com
Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding_food-com_post

Tapioca is a starch extracted from the root of the plant species manihot esculenta. This species, native to the Amazon, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Honduras, and Venezuela is now cultivated worldwide and has many names, including cassava, bitter-cassava and manioc.

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Sack Posset – A Rich Pudding To Cure All Ills / Sack Posset – En Rik Pudding Som Kurerer Alle Onder

A fascinating 16th century recipe found on theguardian.com
sack posset – a rich pudding to cure all ills_post

Although similar to a syllabub, posset is much richer because it is more like a custard than a cream. Possets were served in ceramic posset pots, which looked a bit like a teapot with two handles. They were usually very decorative and extremely expensive to buy. This dish is therefore one of a high standard. Posset was originally more of a drink than a pudding and was often given to people in rich households when they were feeling unwell.

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The recipe is from: The Closet of the Eminently Learned Sir Kenelme Digbie Kt. Opened, commonly known as The Closet Opened, an English cookery book first printed in 1669. It is supposedly based upon the writings of Sir Kenelm Digby, being as the title page states “published by his son’s consent”.

The book gives recipes for traditional English dishes such as meat pies, pasties and syllabub, but also reflects on Digby’s travels around Europe, with recipes such as “Pan Cotto, as the Cardinals use in Rome”. The book echoes an earlier age with some hundred recipes for brewing mead and metheglin.

Traditional British Queen of Puddings / Britiske Tradisjonell Queen of Puddings

A traditional British recipe found on about.com/food/
Traditional British Queen of Puddings_britishfood.about_post

Queen of Puddings is so worthy of its name, a pudding filled with lovely ingredients and crowned with a layer of soft chewy meringue. As you can see from this recipe, it is quick and easy to make, is comforting yet not heavy.

The bottom layer of the puddings is made from eggs, milk, sugar and breadcrumbs with a topping of meringue; fruit is added either in the base of the dish or between the base and meringue; the choice is yours.

Use a thick layer of jam, any fruit preserve, a compote  of seasonal fruit, lemon or fruit curd – even marmalade. The variations of Queen of Puddings are endless. Enjoy

Queen of Puddings is also known as Monmouth Pudding and Manchester Pudding though these are ever so slightly different.

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Guinness Sticky Toffee Pudding / Klebrig Toffeepudding med Guinness

A classic weekend recipe found on goodtoknow.co.uk
goodtoknow.co.uk_Sticky-Toffee-Pudding_post

This Guinness sticky toffee pudding is so indulgent, sweet and spongey – and it’s absolutely delicious with plenty of hot custard poured over it. There’s nothing as warming on a cold winter day as a really rich, sticky pudding and this will really hit the spot. You make this recipe in a slow cooker or in the oven, so take your pick. It takes a little while to cook, which means it’s more of a weekend project, but it’s well worth the time it takes to make and you’ll see why when you get that perfect pudding texture!

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Harlequin Pudding / Harlekinpudding

A recipe found in “Det Nye Kjøkkenbiblioteket”
(The New Kitchen Library) published in 1971
harlekinpudding_post

No cookbook with any selfrespect can omit puddings of course and the puddings can easily be made a day in advance. The harlequin pudding requires neither sauce nor accessories of any kind, Harlequin acting thus here for once without Columbine.

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The King’s Pudding / Kongens Pudding

A royal recipe found in “Mat for Ølvenner”
(Food for Beer Lovers) published by Aventura in 1987

kongens pudding_page

All dishes with royal titles sounds noble. I do not know which king has lend his title to this dish, but it is good enough in any case, as a dessert for the bourgeoisie as well.

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The History of Jell-O

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Jell-O is a registered trademark of Kraft Foods for varieties of gelatin desserts, including fruit gels, puddings and no-bake cream pies.

Description

000_jell-o_07Jell-O is sold prepared (ready to eat) or in powder form, and is available in various colors and flavors. The powder contains powdered gelatin and flavorings, including sugar or artificial sweeteners. It is dissolved in hot water, then chilled and allowed to set. Fruit, vegetables, and whipped cream can be added to make elaborate snacks that can be molded into shapes. Jell-O must be put in a refrigerator until served, and once set, it can be eaten.

There are non-gelatin pudding and pie filling products sold under the Jell-O brand. Pudding is cooked on the stove top with milk, then eaten warm or chilled until firmly set. Jell-O has an instant pudding product which is mixed with cold milk and chilled. To make pie fillings, the same products are prepared with less liquid.

History

Early history

000_jell-o_09Gelatin, a protein produced from collagen extracted from boiled bones, connective tissues, and other animal products, has been a component of food, particularly desserts, since the 15th century.

Gelatin was popularized in the west in the Victorian era with spectacular and complex “jelly moulds”. Gelatin was sold in sheets and had to be purified, which was time-consuming. Gelatin desserts were the province of royalty and the relatively well-to-do. In 1845, a patent for powdered gelatin was obtained by industrialist Peter Cooper, who built the first American steam-powered locomotive, the Tom Thumb. This powdered gelatin was easy to manufacture and easier to use in cooking.

In 1897, in LeRoy, New York, carpenter and cough syrup manufacturer, Pearle Bixby Wait trademarked a gelatin dessert, called Jell-O. He and his wife May added strawberry, raspberry, orange and lemon flavoring to granulated gelatin and sugar. Then in 1899, Jell-O was sold to Orator Francis Woodward (1856–1906), whose Genesee Pure Food Company produced the successful Grain-O health drink. Part of the legal agreement between Woodward and Wait dealt with the similar Jell-O name.

Going mainstream

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Various elements were key to Jell-O becoming a mainstream product: new technologies, such as refrigeration, powdered gelatin and machine packaging, home economics classes, and the company’s marketing.

000_jell-o_12Initially Woodward struggled to sell the powdered product. Beginning in 1902, to raise awareness, Woodward’s Genesee Pure Food Company placed advertisements in the Ladies’ Home Journal proclaiming Jell-O to be “America’s Most Famous Dessert.” Jell-O was a minor success until 1904, when Genesee Pure Food Company sent armies of salesmen into the field to distribute free Jell-O cookbooks, a pioneering marketing tactic. Within a decade, three new flavors, chocolate (discontinued in 1927), cherry and peach, were added, and the brand was launched in Canada.[9] Celebrity testimonials and recipes appeared in advertisements featuring actress Ethel Barrymore and opera singer Ernestine Schumann-Heink. Some Jell-O illustrated advertisements were painted by Maxfield Parrish.

In 1923, the newly rechristened Jell-O Company launched D-Zerta, an artificially sweetened version of Jell-O. Two years later, Postum and Genesee merged, and in 1927 Postum acquired Clarence Birdseye’s frozen foods company to form the General Foods Corporation.

000_jell-o_11By 1930, there appeared a vogue in American cuisine for congealed salads, and the company introduced lime-flavored Jell-O to complement the add-ins that cooks across the country were combining in these aspics and salads. Popular Jell-O recipes often included ingredients like cabbage, celery, green peppers, and even cooked pasta.

By the 1950s, salads would become so popular that Jell-O responded with savory and vegetable flavors such as celery, Italian, mixed vegetable and seasoned tomato. These flavors have since been discontinued.

In 1934, sponsorship from Jell-O made comedian Jack Benny the dessert’s spokesperson. At this time Post introduced a jingle (“featured” by the agency Young & Rubicam) that would be familiar over several decades, in which the spelling “J-E-L-L-O” was (or could be) sung over a rising five-note musical theme. The jingle was written by Don Bestor, who was the bandleader for Jack Benny on his radio program.

In 1936, chocolate returned to the Jell-O lineup, as an instant pudding made with milk. It proved enormously popular, and over time other pudding flavors were added such as vanilla, tapioca, coconut, pistachio, butterscotch, egg custard, flan and rice pudding.

Baby boom

The baby boom saw a significant increase in sales for Jell-O. Young mothers didn’t have the supporting community structures of earlier generations, so marketers were quick to promote easy-to-prepare prepackaged foods. By this time, creating a Jell-O dessert required simply boiling water, Jell-O and Tupperware molds.

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New flavors were continually added and unsuccessful flavors were removed: in the 1950s and 1960s, apple, black cherry, black raspberry, grape, lemon-lime, mixed fruit, orange-banana, pineapple-grapefruit, blackberry, strawberry-banana, tropical fruit and more intense “wild” versions of the venerable strawberry, raspberry and cherry. In 1966, the Jell-O “No-Bake” dessert line was launched, which allowed a cheesecake to be made in 15 minutes. In 1969, Jell-O 1∗2∗3 (later Jell-O 1•2•3), a gelatin dessert that separated into three layers as it cooled, was unveiled. Until 1987, Jell-O 1•2•3 was readily found in grocery stores throughout most of the United States, but the dessert is now rare. In 1971 packaged prepared pudding called Jell-O Pudding Treats were introduced. Jell-O Whip ‘n Chill, a mousse-style dessert, was introduced and widely promoted; it remains available in limited areas today.

Sales decline and turnaround

000_jell-o_04In 1964, the slogan “There’s always room for Jell-O” was introduced, promoting the product as a “light dessert” that could easily be consumed even after a heavy meal.

Throughout the 1960s through the 1980s, Jell-O’s sales steadily decreased. Many Jell-O dishes, such as desserts and Jell-O salads, became special occasion foods rather than everyday items. Marketers blamed this decline on decreasing family sizes, a “fast-paced” lifestyle and women’s increasing employment. By 1986, a market study concluded that mothers with young children rarely purchased Jell-O.

To turn things around, Jell-O hired Dana Gioia to stop the decline. The marketing team revisited the Jell-O recipes published in past cookbooks and rediscovered Jigglers, although the original recipe did not use that name. Jigglers are Jell-O snacks molded into fun shapes and eaten as finger food. Jell-O launched a massive marketing campaign, notably featuring Bill Cosby as spokesman. The campaign was a huge success, causing a significant gain.

000_jell-o_02Cosby became the company’s pudding spokesperson in 1974, and continued as the voice of Jell-O for almost thirty years. Over his tenure as the mouthpiece for the company, he would help introduce new products such as frozen Jell-O Pops (in gelatin and pudding varieties); the new Sugar-Free Jell-O, which replaced D-Zerta in 1984 and was sweetened with NutraSweet; Jell-O Jigglers concentrated gummi snacks; and Sparkling Jell-O, a carbonated version of the dessert touted as the “Champagne of Jell-O.” In 2010, Cosby returned as Jell-O spokesperson in an on-line web series called “OBKB.”

In the 1980s, a Jell-O advertising campaign slogan reminded consumers, “Don’t forget—you have to remember to make it.”

000_jell-o_01In 1990, General Foods merged into Kraft Foods by parent company Philip Morris (now the Altria Group). New flavors were continually introduced: watermelon, blueberry, cranberry, margarita and piña colada among others. In 2001, the state Senate of Utah recognized Jell-O as a favorite snack food of Utah and the Governor Michael O. Leavitt declared an annual “Jell-O Week.” During the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, the souvenir pins included one depicting green Jell-O.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Jell-O’s family-friendly reputation was slightly tarnished by Jell-O shots and Jell-O wrestling.

As of 2008, there are more than 158 products sold under the Jell-O brand name with 300 million boxes of Jell-O gelatin sold in the United States each year.

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Jell-O is used as a substantial ingredient in a well-known dessert, a “Jell-O mold” the preparation of which requires a mold designed to hold gelatin, and the depositing of small quantities of chopped fruit, nuts, and other ingredients before it hardens to its typical form. Fresh pineapple, papaya, kiwi, and ginger root cannot be used because they contain enzymes that prevent gelatin from “setting”. In the case of pineapple juice and the enzyme bromelain that it contains though, the enzyme can be inactivated without denaturing through excessive heating and thus altering the flavor by the addition of a small measured amount of capsaicin sourced from hot chilies.