Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

A different and exciting pizza recipe found on
Dagbladet Mat
Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

In the autumn blueberries can be enjoyed in many ways, and this pizza with blueberries, honey and blue cheese is an exciting variation that tastes amazingly good!

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Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

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Slow Roasted Greek Chicken with Crumbled Feta, Lemon and Olives / Langsomtstekt Gresk Kylling med Smuldret Feta, Sitron og Oliven

A recipe found in “The Dairy Kitchen Cookbook” a free E-book
published by Dairy Australia
Slow Roasted Greek Chicken with Crumbled Feta, Lemon and Olives / Langsomtstekt Gresk Kylling med Smuldret Feta, Sitron og Oliven

Greek cuisine is a Mediterranean cuisine. Contemporary Greek cookery makes wide use of vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish, wine, and meat (white and red, including lamb, poultry, rabbit and pork). Other important ingredients include olives, cheese, eggplant (aubergine), zucchini (courgette), lemon juice, vegetables, herbs, bread and yoghurt. The most commonly used grain is wheat; barley is also used. Common dessert ingredients include nuts, honey, fruits, and filo pastry.

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Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

An Asian inspired soup recipe found on
“The Quick & Eary  Armour Cookbook” published by 
the Benjamin Company in 1980

Oriental Turkey Soup / Orientalsk Kalkunsuppe

I can’t help spotting gherkins on the picture even though it is not mentioned in the recipe so the choice is yours, trust the picture or the recipe. In my opinion you can never go wrong with gherkins, I simply love the stuff

Ted
Winking smile

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Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

An ice cream recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by  Borden’s Condenced Milk
Company in 1927

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

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Cinnamon Coffee Cake / Kaffekake med Kanel

A cake recipe found in “A Sampler of Modern Sour Cream
Recipes” published by American Dairy Association in 1970

Cinnamon Coffee Cake / Kaffekake med Kanel

Cinnamon (/ˈsɪnəmən/ sin-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used in both sweet and savoury foods. The term “cinnamon” also refers to its mid-brown colour.

Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be “true cinnamon“, but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, also referred to as “cassia” to distinguish them from “true cinnamon”.

Cinnamon is the name for perhaps a dozen species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce. All are members of the genus Cinnamomum in the family Lauraceae. Only a few Cinnamomum species are grown commercially for spice.

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Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

A delicious cake recipe found in “Mine Lekreste Kaker”
(My Sweetest Cakes) published by Teknisk Forlag in 1994

Gallop Buns / Galoppboller

Maybe not the most traditional of buns, at least not seen with Norwegian eyes, but who cares they look absolutely delicious.

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Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

A delicious snack recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms ) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982

Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi (fungi which bear fruiting structures that are large enough to be seen with the naked eye). They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand. Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.

Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. Mushrooms consumed by those practicing folk medicine are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.

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Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

An ice coffee recipe found in “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

Wikipedia: Frappé coffee (also Greek frappé or café frappé Greek: φραπές, frapés) is a Greek foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). Accidentally invented by a Nescafe representative named Dimitris Vakondios in 1957 in the city of Thessaloniki, it is now the most popular coffee among Greek youth and foreign tourists. It is popular in Greece, and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries. The word frappé is French and comes from the verb frapper which means to ‘strike’; in this context, however, in French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means chilled, as with ice cubes in a shaker. The frappé has become a hallmark of post-war outdoor Greek coffee culture.

Since this Russian recipe made with real brewed coffee is from 1925
I guess Mr Nescafe Representative must have simply pretended
to invent the frappé coffee after having stolen it from the Russians
in order to push his useless instant coffee

Ted
Winking smile

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Karin’s Soft Syrup Cookies / Karins Myke Sirupskaker

A classic Swedis cookie recipe found in  “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1995
Karin’s Soft Syrup Cookies / Karins Myke Sirupskaker

Ill_01_thumb[36]Karin was the Swedish artist Carl Larsson’s wife. The recipe is assigned to this cookbook by Karin’s and Carls’s grandson. Today, the syrup cookies are baked every Christmas in Larsson’s home Sundborn in Dalarna. The cakes should be quite tough. You keep the toughness by storing the cakes in plastic bags together with a piece of bread.

Potash (potassium carbonate) can be purchased at the pharmacies, but can be substituted with baking powder  or baking soda.

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Medieval Monday – Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

A staple medieval recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.com
Medieval Monday - Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

Almond milk was a staple of the medieval kitchen. It was used in a wide variety of dishes as a substitute for milk or cream, especially on “fish days”, when the church placed restrictions on what foods could be eaten (the most prominent of which were the days during lent). Fortunately, almond milk is quick and easy to make.

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Hen Fricassé / Hønsefrikassé

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found in “Fjærkre”
(Poultry) published by the Hjemmet’s Kokebokklubb in 1882
Hen Fricassé / Hønsefrikassé

Thanks to the devoted efforts of a host in a consumer program on Norwegian television, we can finally get hens in the stores again here and I can finally make one of my childhood’s big dinner favorites, hen fricassé. To make the dish with chicken will never, ever be the same – Ted

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Teurdada Biase – Malaysian Family Omelet / Malaysisk Famileomelett

A spicy Asian omelet recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise” (Asia – A Culinary Voyage) published by
Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987
Teurdada Biase – Malaysian Family Omelet / Malaysisk Famileomelett

This thin omelette with lots of spring onions and red and green chili is a popular little dish in the Malaysian cuisine and is often served with different main courses.

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Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Company
in the 1930s

Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A delicious baked dessert sweetened with sugar, maple syrup or honey.

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Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

A suffle recipe found in “10 Inspirerende Oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 Inspiring Recipes with Jarlsberg)
published by
 Tine
Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

Jarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈjɑːɭsˈbærɡ]; English /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

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