Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A classic summer drink perfect for picnics or outdoor
evening parties found on
goodhousekeeping.co.uk
Warming Ginger Soda / Heit Ingefærdrikk

A delicious old-fashioned drink, perfect to sip at a picnic
or on a summer evening party.

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French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

A classic hot beverage recipe found in “Baker’s Favourite Chocolate Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1936French Chocolate / Fransk Sjokolade

French Chocolate is a hot chocolate, de luxe. It is especially suitable for entertaining when the serving is done by the hostess, and makes an effective, gracious ceremony of afternoon refreshments

Accompaniments for this delicious beverage should be light and  dainty. Thin bread and butter sandwiches, unsweetened wafers, or sponge drops are excellent to serve.

Let this rich, satisfying French Chocolate do the honors at your next party – a bridge luncheon, afternoon, evening, or after-theatre party.

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Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

A fancy jam recipe found on frukt.no
Alliance Jam / Alliansesyltetøy

Making jams from different varieties of berries together is always a success. Try the mix you like the best. In this jam we used red currant, raspberry and black currant.

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Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

A medieval Roman recipe found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

This recipe illustrates the Roman love of dishes that could be dipped into sauces. A vast array dishes could be served in bowls and platters. Meat would be carved into small pieces, so that each guest only picks what he needs and dips the meat into the accompanying sauces served in little bowls.

The meat would be cooked over a raised brick hearth, on top of which was a charcoal fire. The meat was placed in a pan on a tripod placed over the fire or cooked directly on a grid. Also used were frying pans (pensa), deeper pans (patella and patina), mixing bowls (mortaria) with a spout for pouring.

The recipe given here is not meant to be cooked in a modern kitchen but on an open fire or on a charcoal grill. Roman cooks judged quantities by eye so measurements are not given. Apicius provides the ingredients for the sauce, this then accompanies pan- fried meat.

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The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

A baking recipe inspired by literature found on theguardian.com
The Plum Tart from “The Light Years” / Plummeterten fra "The Light Years"

They all had dinner – fourteen of them round the immense three-pedestal table extended to its uttermost and even then they were crammed round it. They ate four roast chickens, bread sauce, mashed potato and runner beans followed by plum tart and what the Duchy called Shape – blancmange.

From “The Light Years” by Elizabeth Jane Howard

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Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

A 19th century refreshment recipe found on worldturn’udupsidedown
Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down’  writes: This recipe was cooked for the Historical Food Fortnightly. A yearly challenge that encourages bloggers to cook a historical food every two weeks.

Civil War Era Pinappleade recipe

For this challenge I decided to take on a lemonade twist with pineappleade. Pineapples were exotic fruits in the 1800s, mostly grown in Jamaica. They were used for such dishes as ice cream, pudding, pineapple chips, fritters, drinks and marmalade. They were considered a “dessert” fruit and was often paired with sugar. Pineapples, being imports, were not as common as home grown fruits. The first large quantity producing pineapple plantation in Florida was started in 1860 by Captain Benjamin Baker, who was probably accustomed to the enjoyment of them at sea.

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Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

A spicy pattie recipe found in “New Fashion Plates for
Your Menu” published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932

Beef Patties Creole / Kreolske Karbonader

Creole Cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana, United States which blends French, Spanish, Indian, Caribbean, Portuguese, Greek, Canarian, West African, Amerindian, German, Italian and Irish influences, as well as influences from the general cuisine of the Southern United States.

Creole cuisine revolves around influences found in Louisiana from populations present in Louisiana before the sale of Louisiana to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

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Pear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

An exiting way to preserve pears found on frukt.noPear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

A yummy and slightly different marmalade with pear, saffron and chili. The marmalade goes great with  fried meat and it makes a delicious sandwich spread.

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Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A delicious dessert recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980
Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish originating from the early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and whipped egg white combined with various other ingredients and served as a tasty main course or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé comes from the French verb souffler which means ‘to breath’ or ‘to puff’.

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Austrian Apricot Dumplings / Østerrikske Aprikosdumplings

An Austrian dessert speciality found in “The best of International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984
Austrian Apricot Dumplings / Østerrikske Aprikosdumplings

Dumpling is a broad classification for a dish that consists of small pieces of dough (made from a variety of starch sources), often wrapped around a filling (as in ravioli or wontons). The dough can be based on bread, flour, or potatoes, and may be filled with fish, meat, sweets, or vegetables. They may be cooked by boiling, frying, simmering, or steaming.

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Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

A classic Continental 19th century cake recipe found in
“The Chocolate Book” by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Hungarian Dobos Torte / Ungarsk Dobos Torte

Dobos torte or Dobosh (pronounced [ˈdoboʃ], Hungarian: Dobos torta) is a Hungarian sponge cake layered with chocolate buttercream and topped with caramel. The five-layer pastry is named after its inventor, Hungarian confectioner József C. Dobos, who aimed to create a cake that would last longer than other pastries in an age when cooling techniques were limited. The round sides of the cake are coated with ground hazelnuts, chestnuts, walnuts, or almonds, and the caramel topping helps to prevent drying out.

Dobosh or Dobos torte was first introduced at the National General Exhibition of Budapest in 1885; King Franz Joseph I and Queen Elisabeth were among the first to taste it. The cake soon became popular throughout Europe, both for its durability through shipping and for its unique appearance. With its flat, shiny, caramel top, it was simple but elegant, as opposed to the more intricate cakes of the age.

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Farmhouse Pasta / Bondepasta

A farmhouse recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982
Farmhouse Pasta / Bondepasta

A nice way to showcase tasty mushrooms – in a simple,
creamy, delicious mushroom pasta!

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Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

A bun recipe found in “Den Store Bakeboken”
(The Big Baking Book) published by Schibstedt in 1978
Norwegian Sunshine Buns / Solskinnsboller

In Northern Norway, these are usually called just “Solboller”
(Sun Buns) and they are eaten  at the end of the dark winter
to celebrate that the sun has returned.

You might have seen other recipes for Norwegian
Sunshine Buns, there is a multitude of them
out there. I’ve even posted at least one earlier – Ted

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Pea, Marjoram and Mascarpone Soup/ Erter-, Merian- og Mascarponesuppe

A filling soup recipe found in “90 Years of KitchenAid –
The Cook Book” a free E-book published in 2009
Pea, Marjoram and Mascarpone Soup/ Erter-, Merian- og Mascarponesuppe

Green pea soup is a classic spring soup. Replace the marjoram with basil  and the mascarpone with ricotta for a lighter version of this soup.

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Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

A baking recipe from “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

Yet another of those eats for adults from the book that tells you the story of coffee and gives you recipes for coffee tasting goodies.

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