Persian Pilaf / Persisk Pilaf

An exotic rice dish found in “Ris og Pasta” in the “Menu –
International Madleksikon” series publisert by Lademann i 1978

Persian Pilaf / Persisk Pilaf

Pilaf is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth. In some cases, the rice may attain its brown or golden colour by first being sauteed lightly in oil before the addition of broth. Cooked onion, other vegetables, as well as a mix of spices, may be added. Depending on the local cuisine, it may also contain meat, fish, vegetables, pasta, and dried fruit.

Pilaf and similar dishes are common to Balkan, Middle Eastern, Caucasian, Central and South Asian, East African, Latin American, and Caribbean cuisines. It is a staple food and a national dish in Afghan, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Balochi, Bangladeshi, Bukharan Jewish, Cretan, Indian, Iranian, Kazakh, Kurdish, Kyrgyz, Pakistani, Swahili (Kenyan, Tanzanian-Zanzibari), Tajik, Turkish, Uyghur, and Uzbek cuisines.

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Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

A classic Victorian breakfast recipe found on CookIt!
Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

Kedgeree originated amongst the British colonials in India and was introduced to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times. It is rarely eaten for breakfast these days, but is still very popular for lunch or supper.

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Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

A spicy dinner recipe found in “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by Dairy Australia
Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

Thai cuisine (Thai: อาหารไทย, rtgs: Ahan Thai, pronounced [ʔāː.hǎːn tʰāj]) is the national cuisine of Thailand. Balance, detail, and variety are of paramount significance to Thai chefs.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating “intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor”, as well as care being given to the food’s appearance, smell and context. Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about “the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish”.

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Lobster Soup «Moscovitt» with Black Caviar / Hummersuppe «Moscovitt» med Limfjordkaviar

A delicate soup recipe found in “God Mat fra Sjøen”
(Nice Food from the Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984

Lobster Soup «Moscovitt» with Black Caviar / Hummersuppe «Moscovitt» med Limfjordkaviar

Contrary to most Western European shellfish soups this Russian style lobster soup is thick, filling and served with a couple of thin toasts (Toast Melba) with each serving it is hardly an appatizer but a a full meal.

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In context

Melba toast is a dry, crisp and thinly sliced toast, often served with soup and salad or topped with either melted cheese or pâté. It is Dame Nellie Melbanamed after Dame Nellie Melba, the stage name of Australian opera singer Helen Porter Mitchell. Its name is thought to date from 1897, when the singer was very ill and it became a staple of her diet. The toast was created for her by chef and fan Auguste Escoffier, who also created the Peach Melba dessert for her. The hotel proprietor César Ritz supposedly named it in a conversation with Escoffier. 

Melba toast is made by lightly toasting slices of bread under a grill, on both sides. The resulting toast is then sliced laterally. The thin slices are then returned to the grill with the untoasted sides towards the heat source, resulting in toast half the normal thickness.Thus, it can be described as a twice-baked food (see rusk).

Melba toast is also available commercially, and was at one time given to infants who were teething as a hard food substance on which to chew.

In France, it is referred to as croûtes en dentelle.

Heavenly Rice Pudding / Himmelsk Rispudding

A dessert recipe from an ad for Carnation published
in LIFE magazine in 1958

Heavenly Rice Pudding / Himmelsk Rispudding

When I started this blog back in late 2013 I based a lot of the first posts on old ads and the designer in me has missed that for a while now, so I think I’ll post some of these from time to time again from now on – Ted

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Pan Fried Chicken with Cucumber / Pannestekt Kylling med Agurk

A refreshing dinner recipe found in  “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988
Pan Fried Chicken with Cucumber / Pannestekt Kylling med Agurk

Nice mouthfuls of chicken together with cucumber in lime and lemon sauce taste delicious and refreshing on a hot summer day.

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Chicken on Horseback / Kylling til Hest

A dinner recipe found in “Fjærfe på Menyen”
(Poultry on the Menu) published by
Den Norske Bokklubben in 1984
Chicken on Horseback / Kylling til Hest

I’ve heard of both angels on horseback and devils on horseback, even posted a recipe for the angels way back in 2014. But chicken on horseback was new to me. Looks nice enough to give a try though, chicken thighs, prunes and bacon sounds like a delicious combo – Ted

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Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

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Aunt Jemima Pancakes Variations / Amerikanske Pannekakevariasjoner

Pancake recipes found in “A recipe No Other Mammy Cook Could Equal” published by The Quaker Oats Company in 1928
Aunt-Jemima-Pancakes-Variations_thum

Aunt Jemima is a brand of pancake mix, syrup, and other breakfast foods owned by the Quaker Oats Company of Chicago. The trademark dates to 1893, although Aunt Jemima pancake mix debuted in 1889. The Quaker Oats Company first registered the Aunt Jemima trademark in April 1937. Aunt Jemima originally came from a minstrel show as one of their pantheon of stereotypical black characters. The character appears to have been a Reconstruction era addition to that cast.

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Party Dressed Fish / Selskapsfin Fisk

A classic fish dinner recipe found in “Fisk og Skalldyr” (Fish and Shellfish) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980Party Dressed Fish / Selskapsfin Fisk

White fish, rice, asparagus and shrimps is a classic Scandinavian dinner dish combination and can be found in a multitude of recipes from our little part of the world. It is as the title of the post suggests classic party food. It was when this book was published in 1980 and it so absolutely still is – Ted

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Stuffed Peppers / Fylt Paprika

A snack recipe found in “Mat for Alle” (Food for Everyone)
published by Tiden Norske Forlag in 1985
Fylt Paprika_post

Stuffed peppers and other vegetables are a cooking technique that can be found many places in the world, but to day most of us usually think of it as traditional Middle Eastern way to prepare food.

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Cambodian Chicken-and-Rice Soup with Shrimp / Kambodsjansk Kylling-og-Ris Suppe med Reker

A spicy Asian soupe recipe found on foodandwine.com
Cambodian Chicken-and-Rice Soup with Shrimp_food&wine_post

The chef’s way: For this spicy, soothing and restorative chicken-and-rice soup, Ratha Chau prepares his own delectable chicken stock and roasts a chicken, which is then cut into large pieces and added to it.

The easy way: Using prepared stock and preroasted chicken significantly cuts back on prep time.

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Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese style lunch recipe found in “Internasjonale Retter med Norsk Fisk” (International dishes with Norwegian Fish) published
by Wennergren – Cappelen in 1987

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese steamer like the one on the picture is a great addition to any kitchen and can be used to steam just about anything. Rise, fish,
vegetables, shelfish, you name it. If you haven’t already got one,
go get one.

Ted
Winking smile

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

A Caucasian chicken  recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

The cuisine of the Caucasus includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.

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