Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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History of Caesar Salad

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Caesar Salad is probably one of the best known salads along with Waldorf and Greek salads, but with so many variations being made and served today, the original recipe has escaped many chefs, so let’s start with the true recipe for a Caesar Salad.

Original Recipe

Worcestershire sauceThe recipe consisted of romaine or similar long crisp lettuce leaves, garlic croutons and shavings of parmesan cheese all tossed in a creamy dressing made of egg, olive oil, vinegar and/or lemon juice, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. 

Contrary to popular belief, the original Caesar salad recipe did not contain pieces of anchovy.  Perhaps modern versions include them because the original did have a slight anchovy flavour, however this came from Worcestershire sauce.  It is believed that the inventor was opposed to using anchovies in his salad. It is also believed that originally,  the lettuce leaves were often served whole  because it was meant to be lifted by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

Who Invented Caesar Salad

The History of Caesar Salad_02If you thought the name derives from the great Caesars of Rome, and you had notions of Julius Caser, Caligula or Nero tucking into this wonderful dish,  then you may be disappointed to know it was invented many centuries later by a chef called Caesar Cardini (1896-1956).

Although there are several stories about exactly how the salad was invented,  there is one fact which is undisputable, namely that Cardini most certainly created it in Tijuana, Mexico in the 1920s.

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One version states that due to prohibition, many film stars would take the short trip over the border to relax and party,  especially wealthy socialites and the Hollywood crowd.  One 4th July, Cardini’s restaurant was inundated with guests wanting to celebrate, which quickly ran down the kitchen’s supplies, so Cardini had to make do with what he had left, and made up the salad with the additional flair of  tossing it himself at the tables of the guests.

Over the years, driving to Tijuana for a Caesar Salad became the rage.  Not only did Hollywood stars such as Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, and W. C. Fields make the pilgrimage, but so did gossip columnists who subsequently wrote about it in their columns.

Clark Gable

Today’s Caesar Salad Variations

Today, there are many variations including the addition of grilled chicken, strips of steak, salmon or prawns (shrimp) which make them ideal as a light main course rather than as a starter or side salad.

Text from recipes4us

French Ham Plate / Fransk Skinketallerken

A Continental lunch plate recipe found in “Norsk Ukeblads
Store Salatbok” (The Norwegian Weekly Family Magazine’s
Large Salad Book) published in 1984

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Warm Raspberry Soup with Pear Salad and Waffles / Varm Bringebærsuppe med Pæresalat og Vafler

A great dessert soup recipe found on kiwi.noVarm bringebærsuppe med pæresalat og vafler_post

Extend the summer feeling a little with this fresh
and varm raspberry soup.

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Lobster Lunch / Hummer Lunsj

A fancy lunch recipe found on godt.no
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This is simply a small lobster sandwich. It’s nice fresh bread stuffed with homemade lobster salad; You use good quality hot dog buns or halved baguettes and a fully cooked lobster.

The most complicated part of this dish is to clean the boiled lobster; if you have not done this before, it is quite amazing how much fumbling it might take to get it done  😉

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Mussels Salad with Cheese Sauce / Blåskjellsalat med Ostesaus

A shellfish recipe found on Norsk Ukeblads “Store Salatbok”
(Big Salad Book) published in 1985

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Marine mussels are abundant in the low and mid intertidal zone in temperate seas globally. Other species of marine mussel live in tropical intertidal areas, but not in the same huge numbers as in temperate zones.

Certain species of marine mussels prefer salt marshes or quiet bays, while others thrive in pounding surf, completely covering wave-washed rocks. Some species have colonized abyssal depths near hydrothermal vents. The South African white mussel exceptionally doesn’t bind itself to rocks but burrows into sandy beaches extending two tubes above the sand surface for ingestion of food and water and exhausting wastes.

Freshwater mussels inhabit permanent lakes, rivers, canals and streams throughout the world except in the polar regions. They require a constant source of cool, clean water. They prefer water with a substantial mineral content, using calcium carbonate to build their shells.

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Chicken Salad Queen Victoria / Hønsesalat Queen Victoria

 A classic salad recipe found on the Snack & Salads section
on the Danish “International Food Encyclopaedia MENU”
published by Lademann

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I don’t know if old Victoria liked this salad particularly, but the Danish Lademann’s “International Food Encyclopaedia MENU” has chosen to call it that anyway. I have my doubts really, as I’ve read on several occasions that she preferred her dishes a lot more filling than this – Ted  😉

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Tarragon Chicken Salad Tea Sandwiches / Tesmørbrød med Estragon og Kyllingsalat

A classic afternoon tea recipe found on cookingchanneltv.com
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Petite, crustless tea sandwiches are meant to accompany afternoon tea: just the sort of light but filling snack to stave off hunger until dinner.

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Filled Trout On The Grill / Fylt Ørret På Grillen

A classic Norwegian way to cook trout found in “Sommermat”
(Summer Food) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

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When you have caught a few 1/2 pound sized stream or mountain trouts there is few other ways to cook them better than this. Whether you cook them on an electric, gas or charcoal grill or right there in the embers of your camp fire they will taste absolutely delicious – Ted

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California Cocktail

A great summer salad found in the “Småretter og Salater”
(Snacks and Salads) part of the
Danish series MENU Internationalt Madleksikon
Published by Lademann

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I have no idea whether this salad recipe originates from California or if it is just a name the authors of the book thought was a fancy name. Whatever, the salad looks quite delicious – Ted

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An Exotic Salad / En Eksotisk Salat

A recipe from “Norsk Ukeblads Store Salatbok”
(Norwegian Weekly’s Large Salad Book) published in 1984
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Salad Parisienne / Salat Parisienne

A delicious salad recipe found in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978
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Beef Salad Parisienne. A hearty salad with juicy steak, tender potatoes, sliced onions, and a zesty vinaigrette that could also doubles as a marinade.

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In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here.

Salad Barbados/ Salat Barbados

A salad recipe from “Fjærkre” (Poultry) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

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A delicious chicken salad with a spicy touch of the Caribbean.

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Hot Crabmeat-Avocado Salad / Varm Krabbe og Avocado Salat

A recipe from “The Betty Crocker Recipe Card Library”
published in 1971

Salad - Hot Crabmeat Avocado Salad C

An elegant, different hot salad with moist filling and crunchy topping.

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