Ploughman’s Picnic Loaf / Pløyerens Piknikloff

A picnic loaf recipe found on tescorealfood.com
Ploughman’s Picnic Loaf / Pløyerens Piknikloff

It is still high season for picnics here on the northern hemisphere so if the weather is agreeable there is no reason to sit down indoors to have lunch. Pack the lunch and find yourself a nice peaceful spot. Remember winter is back in just a few months – Ted

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Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

A delicious breakfast idea found on meny.no
Breakfast Sandwich with Fried Egg / Frokostsmørbrød med Speilegg

This is a sandwich perfect for a full breakfast! Buy half-baked bread and make a sandwich of fresh bread with aioli, Provence ham, finely chopped spring onions, cherry tomatoes and toped it all with a fried egg for each. Simple and fast breakfast, but very good.

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Pear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

An exiting way to preserve pears found on frukt.noPear Marmalade with Saffron and Chili / Pæremarmelade med Safran og Chili

A yummy and slightly different marmalade with pear, saffron and chili. The marmalade goes great with  fried meat and it makes a delicious sandwich spread.

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Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

A fresh take on the club sandwich found in
“Torsk til Hverdag  og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Parties)
a free E-book published by
Godfisk!
Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also great as party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good mood is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod fits just perfectly both for everydays and parties.

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Tomato-Cheese Toast / Tomat- og Ostetoast

A snack recipe found in “New Fashion Plates for Your Menu”
published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932
Tomato-Cheese Toast / Tomat- og Ostetoast

Cheese sandwiches is a snack dish that never seems to go out of style.
I’ve found recipes for such from every decade through out the last
century and both decades in this. Cheese sandwiches really
deserves to be called a classic – Ted

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Boston Bean Sandwich / Sandwich med Bakte Bønner

A snack recipe found in “Thrifty New Tips on a Grand Old Favorite” published by  H J Heinz Co in 1932Boston Bean Sandwich / Sandwich med Bakte Bønner

The English author and singer/songwriter Michael Harding say on an intro to one of the songs on one of his records “Beans are bad at the best of times”. Although I’m a big fan I can’t quite agree with him there, I’m actually quite fond of beans – Ted

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Cucumber (and Mint) Sandwiches / Agurk (og Mynte) Sandwich

An inter-war years sandwich recipe found on CookIt
Cucumber (and Mint) Sandwiches / Agurk (og Mynte) Sandwich

Cucumber sandwiches were often served as part of a formal afternoon tea. They had been very fashionable for the upper classes in the Edwardian era and had now become part of ordinary people’s afternoon tea.

Lyon’s Corner Houses were a popular place for people to go and have tea, scones and sandwiches. This recipe comes from a former employee of Lyons, Mrs Olive Bloomfield.

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Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

A delicious snack recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms ) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982

Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi (fungi which bear fruiting structures that are large enough to be seen with the naked eye). They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand. Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.

Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. Mushrooms consumed by those practicing folk medicine are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.

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Chef’s Sandwich / Kokkens Sandwich

A classic sandwich recipe found in “The Quick & Eary Armour Cookbook” published by Benjamin Company/Rutledge Book
in 1980

Chef’s Sandwich / Kokkens Sandwich

The picnic season is drawing near even here in Norway and this recipe is well worth remembering when you pack the the late spring’s first picknic basket.

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New York Reuben / New York Reuben Sandwich

A sandwich recipe found in “2012 Australian Grand Dairy Awards Best of the Best Cookbook” published by Dairy Australia
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The Reuben sandwich is an American hot sandwich composed of corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Russian dressing, grilled between slices of rye bread. Several variants exist.

Possible origins

Reuben Kulakofsky, Blackstone Hotel, Omaha, Nebraska

The most widely accepted origin holds that Reuben Kulakofsky (his first name sometimes spelled Reubin; his last name sometimes shortened to Kay), a Jewish Lithuanian-born grocer residing in Omaha, Blackstone HotelNebraska, was the inventor, perhaps as part of a group effort by members of Kulakofsky’s weekly poker game held in the Blackstone Hotel from around 1920 through 1935.

The participants, who nicknamed themselves “the committee”, included the hotel’s owner, Charles Schimmel. The sandwich first gained local fame when Schimmel put it on the Blackstone’s lunch menu, and its fame spread when a former employee of the hotel won a national contest with the recipe. In Omaha, March 14 was proclaimed as Reuben Sandwich Day.

Reuben’s Delicatessen: New York City

Reuben's DelicatessenAnother account holds that the Reuben’s creator was Arnold Reuben, the German-Jewish owner of the famed Reuben’s Delicatessen (1908 – 2001) in New York City. According to an interview with Craig Claiborne, Arnold Reuben invented the “Reuben Special” around 1914. The earliest references in print to the sandwich are New York–based, but that is not conclusive evidence, though the fact that the earliest, in a 1926 issue of Theatre Magazine, references a “Reuben Special”, does seem to take its cue from Arnold Reuben’s menu.

Marjorie RambeauA variation of the above account is related by Bernard Sobel in his 1953 book, Broadway Heartbeat: Memoirs of a Press Agent. Sobel states that the sandwich was an extemporaneous creation for Marjorie Rambeau inaugurated when the famed Broadway actress visited the Reuben’s Delicatessen one night when the cupboards were particularly bare.

Some sources name the actress in the above account as Annette Seelos, not Marjorie Rambeau, while also noting that the original “Reuben Special” sandwich of 1926 did not contain corned beef or sauerkraut and was not grilled.

Still other versions give credit to Alfred Scheuing, a chef at Reuben’s Delicatessen, and say he created the sandwich for Reuben’s son, Arnold Jr., in the 1930s.

1860s Crab Apple Jelly / Villeplegele fra 1860tallet

A historic wild fruit recipe found on World Turn’d Upside Down
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Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: When Pehr Kalm, a Swedish-Finnish naturalist, visited Pennsylvania in the 1750s, he remarked that crab apples were plentiful but were not good for anything but making vinegar. Crab apples have a reputation of being a useless fruit and a nuisance. As Pehr Kalm suggested, I had actually intended to make vinegar out of my collection.

Once the tweeting birds were replaced with squawking crows, too close for comfort, I decided I had enough to make a small container of vinegar and one of preserves of some kind. I took the collection home and rinsed it in a few washes. I was still unsure of what kind of preserve I wanted to make. I was stuck between making marmalade and jelly. I ended up making jelly because more people would enjoy it.

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Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches / Skinke, Ananas, og Agurk Sandwicher

A delisious Afternoon Tea sandwich recipe found
on teatimemagazine.com

Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches / Skinke, Ananas, og Agurk Sandwicher

These pretty Ham, Pineapple, and Cucumber Sandwiches,
garnished with thin slices of cucumber, will add a touch of elegance
to your tea table.

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A Short History of Le Croque Monsieur

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The French name Croque Monsieur translates to  “Crisp Mister” and is basically a cooked cheese and ham sandwich, traditionally made with gruyere cheese and thinly sliced ham.  The name is sometimes shortened to just Croque.

The First Croque Monsieur

croque monsieur_02The first Croque Monsieur was simply a hot ham and cheese sandwich which was fried in butter – one step further than what some believe was the original which was accidentally created when French workers left the tins containing their lunches of  sandwiches on  hot radiators  whilst they worked. By the time they came to eat them, the heat of the radiators had melted the cheese.

croque monsieur_03It’s not known who had the idea of embellishing the recipe by frying the sandwich until crisp and golden,  however they first  appeared on menus in Parisian cafés in 1910, and the earliest written reference is thought to have been by the novelist Proust in his 1918 work titled  À la recherche du temps perdu  (In search of lost time).

Today’s Croque Monsieur

Over the years, further changes were made to the basic recipe, in particular the addition of mustard and a béchamel sauce. Whilst this complicated an otherwise simple recipe, versions made this way are sumptuous and relatively filling  and well worth the extra attention. 

Then came the variations including:
The addition of a fried egg served on top – a Croque Madame
The addition of tomatoes – a Croque Provençal
The substitution of  blue cheese for Gruyere – a Croque Auvergnat
The substitution of smoked salmon for the ham – a Croque Norvégien

Simpel Croque Monsieur Recipes

A simple version would be to make a cheese and ham sandwich in the usual way, then fry in butter until crisp and golden on both sides. Alternatively, spread the outside on your sandwich with plenty of butter and cook under a very hot grill until well browned on both sides.

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Text from recipes4us

Cambridge Market Sandwich / Sandwich Fra Cambridge Markedet

A great British sandwich recipe  found on food52.com
Cambridge Market Sandwich / Sandwich Fra Cambridge Markedet

How many times have you eaten blue cheese and apples and in how many combinations and yet never thought of putting them together in a sandwich. In Cambridge you can get them  wrapped in brown paper, and eat them on a bench outside of King’s College while the choir practiced for an upcoming concert and the students rushed around in their robes.

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Beef, Onion and Horseradish Cheddar Panini / Roastbiff, Løk og Pepperrotcheddar Panini

A delicious grilled sandwich recipe found in a booklet
published by American Dairy Association in 2004
Beef, Onion and Horseradish Cheddar Panini / Roastbiff, Løk og Pepperrotcheddar Panini

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Text from the booklet: Americans have always had a Passion for European-inspired foods – foods that embody tradition, pure enjoyment and a topic of conversation. The latest infatuationto “heat up” the scene is hearty Italian-style sandwiches, called Panini.

665_intro_image paninis

In Italy, the word Panino (a diminutive of pane or bread) means, “little bread” or “sandwich.” And as the name suggests, Panini are sandwiches with Romance. Made with fresh ingredients, distinctive wholesome breads and mouthwatering cheeses – Panini embrace all that is Old World.

Prepared with care and creativity, our Cheesy Panini recipes combine that old-world taste passed down for generations with new-world simplicity.

Because convenience is key, it’s no wonder more people are making sandwiches for dinner. In an American Dairy Association survey, more than 61 percent of today’s cooks said they make an everyday sandwich taste even better by heating it up and by adding bold-flavored ingredients, such as two or three different kinds of cheese.

Whether you use a new indoor grill, oven or stovetop preparation, making mouthwatering Panini at home is deceptively quick and simple.
All of our featured recipes include fresh, robust flavours on crusty breads with warm delicious cheese. And each takes 35 minutes or less to prepare – proving that big taste really does come in small packages!