Pork Chops in Tarragon Sauce / Koteletter i Estragonsaus

An exciting recipe for pork chops found in “Svinekjøtt” (Pork)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Pork Chops in Tarragon Sauce / Koteletter i Estragonsaus

I take it you followed the advice from two posts back and packed your lunch and went outdoors. If you did you deserve a really good dinner, so why not try this delicious recipe for pork chops.

Ted
Winking smile

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Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

A classic side dish found in “Varme Småretter” (Small Hot
Dishes) in the  “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) series
publishd by Gyldendal i 1991

Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

If you think it’s a lot of work to first cook the vegetables and then gratinate them afterwards, you can use deep-frozen vegetables as a starting point.

Deep frozen broccoli or a blend of summer vegetables are excellent. Put the vegetables deep frozen in the mould and pour the sauce over them. Calculate 4-5 minutes longer in the oven for the frozen ones.

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Orange Ice Cream with Meringue and Chocolate Sauce / Appelsinis med Marengs og Sjokoladesaus

A classic dessert recipe found in “Desserter” (Desserts)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

Orange Ice Cream with Meringue and Chocolate Sauce / Appelsinis med Marengs og Sjokoladesaus

Ice cream, meringues and chocolate sauce, man, that makes
any dessert lover sigh with happiness. At least I do,
and that’s just thinking about it

Ted
Winking smile

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Fish with Nice Sauce / Fisk med Fin Sås

A seafood recipe found in “God Mat på en 1/2 Timme” (Nice Food in Half an Hour) published by Alt Om Mat in 1974
Fish with Nice Sauce / Fisk med Fin Sås

The simple fish sauce gets a creamy consistency from cream cheese and a spicy touch of mustard. Please try the combination next time you cook fish.

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Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

A classic Irish breakfast recipe found on irishcentral.com
Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

Steak and eggs is a dish prepared with beefsteak and eggs as primary ingredients. It is most typically served as a breakfast or brunch food, although it can also be consumed at any mealtime, such as for dinner in the evening.

Ingredients

Various types of beefsteaks can be used, such as rib eye, strip, sirloin and flank, among others. Additional ingredients may include bell pepper, garlic, onion, butter, salt, pepper, seasonings and others. Accompaniments may include various sauces, such as steak sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chimichurri. and others.

Variations

Variations include steak and egg sandwiches, open sandwiches and steak and Eggs Benedict.  A version of steak and egg salad utilizes greens such as arugula, poached eggs and steak.  Vegetarian versions also exist, in which vegetables, such as cauliflower, squash and potatoes, are sliced into thick steaks and served with eggs.

In popular culture

Steak and eggs is the traditional NASA astronaut’s breakfast, first served to Alan Shepard before his flight on May 5, 1961.

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Chicken Burger with Coriander Sauce / Kyllingburger med Koriandersaus

A spicy lunch recipe found on prior.no
Chicken Burger with Coriander Sauce / Kyllingburger med Koriandersaus

Chicken burgers are a nice change from the classic beef burgers
and this spicy version is simply delicious.

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Fried Apple Slices with Fennel Sugar and Apple Caramel Sauce / Friterte Epleskiver med Fennikelsukker og Eplekaramellsaus

A slightly different dessert / snack recipe found on godt.no
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Spicy and golden apple slices sprinkled with fennel sugar and dipped in apple caramel sauce can be summed up with one word: delicious!

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Roast Pork Tenderloin with Tropical Sauce / Helstekt Svinefilet med Tropisk Saus

A dinner recipe with a touch of the tropics found in “Minikokeboken – Svinekjøtt Spennende og Enkelt”
(The Mini Cook Book – Pork Exciting and Simple)
published by the Norwegian Information Office for Meat

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Tropical Sauce / Helstekt Svinefilet med Tropisk Saus

Pork tenderloin is one of the easiest, most relaxed cuts of meat to cook for dinner. The tenderloin comes from the loin of the pig, which runs from the hip to the shoulder. The tenderloin itself is sometimes also called a pork “fillet,” and it is one of the tenderest cuts of meat on the animal, since it is not a muscle that receives much if any exercise.

This means that the tenderloin is usually a little more expensive than cuts of meat that need longer cooking, like the loin proper or pork butt (shoulder). It also means that it can be cooked quickly and easily, with no brining or braising needed.

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Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome’s ‘Ketchup’ Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

An article by Olga Oksman posted on theguardian.com
Wednesday 26 August 2015

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

Garum and other similar fish-based sauces were the ketchup of the ancient world, mass produced in factories by the Romans, and sprinkled on anything savory. They usually made several versions: a dark-colored table condiment that was high in protein, a cooking sauce similar to Thai and Vietnamese fish sauces (sometimes called liquamen by historians, though often grouped together with garum), and a milder version called muria, explains food historian Sally Grainger. The fall of the Roman empire meant the end of its mass production, but the art of the fish sauce was not lost in Italy. The modern-day version, colatura di alici, is a saltier mixture of all three sauces.

Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredient

While Italy may not be the first place that comes to mind when thinking of fish sauce, several companies on the Amalfi coast continue the ancient traditions. Today’s colatura is a clear, amber liquid made from Garum Sauce: Ancient Rome's 'Ketchup' Becomes a Modern-Day Secret Ingredientfermented, salted anchovies and sold in tiny, elegant glass bottles. It is often described as the great-grandfather of Worcestershire sauce. “There is only a difference of a few ingredients, but colatura tastes better,” Grace Singleton, managing partner at Zingerman’s Delicatessen, tells me.

Zingerman’s, based in Michigan, started carrying the condiment around 15 years ago, when co-founding partner Ari Weinzweig found himself in the Amalfi coast town of Cetara, where it has been made for generations. After tasting it for the first time, Weinzweig knew he had to carry it in his store. It took a year to get all the labelling right for US importation, but it was worth it. Since then, the sauce has had a steady following, Weinzweig tells me.

Everyone who has tried it remembers the exact moment when colatura di alici and taste buds first met. For Matt Armendariz, who runs the food blog Matt Bites, it was in Italy, in an aioli sauce. “My mind was blown. It had this umami flavor and I asked the chef why it was so delicious, and he said he used colatura di alici. I just fell in love with it,” Armendariz fondly recalls.

Garum jugs from PompeiiThe amber sauce, which is fermented traditionally in chestnut barrels, is an inexpensive way to add depth and flavor to dishes, says Singleton. A little glass bottle will set you back on average $15, but you only need a sprinkling to bring a new dimension to food.

It is also the key to a quick and simple pasta dish popular in the Amalfi coast. Any kind of long, thin pasta is mixed with garlic, chili-infused olive oil and a little colatura di alici for an unmistakable savory rich flavor that belies its simple ingredients. Armendariz recommends sprinkling it on ripe tomatoes or putting a few drops on grilled steaks and other meats to make the flavor pop. Singleton favors using it in place of salt in dishes, since it does double duty by both salting a dish and accentuating its flavors.

Despite its fishy origins, don’t think of it as a fish sauce, says Armendariz, who refers to the flavor enhancer as a “genie in a bottle” on his blog. It’s a true secret ingredient for the modern age, taken straight out of the ancient world.


In context

Roman Garum was a fermented fish sauce used as a condiment in the cuisines of ancient Greece, Rome, and Byzantium. Liquamen was a similar preparation, and at times the two were synonymous. Although it enjoyed its greatest popularity in the Roman world, the sauce was earlier used by the Greeks.

When mixed with wine (oenogarum, a popular Byzantine sauce), vinegar, black pepper, or oil, garum enhances the flavor of a wide variety of dishes, including boiled veal and steamed mussels, even pear-and-honey soufflé. Diluted with water (hydrogarum) it was distributed to Roman legions. Pliny (d. 79) remarked in his Natural History that it could be diluted to the colour of honey wine and drunk.

You might have noticed that Liquamen was listed among the
ingredients on my Medieval Monday post a few days ago.
You can find old recipes for Garum here

http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/garum.htm

and here

http://www.pompeii-food-and-drink.org/garum.htm

Ted

Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

A medieval Roman recipe found on CookIt!
Medieval Monday – Pork with Pine Kernel Sauce / Svinekjøtt med Pinjekjernesaus

This recipe illustrates the Roman love of dishes that could be dipped into sauces. A vast array dishes could be served in bowls and platters. Meat would be carved into small pieces, so that each guest only picks what he needs and dips the meat into the accompanying sauces served in little bowls.

The meat would be cooked over a raised brick hearth, on top of which was a charcoal fire. The meat was placed in a pan on a tripod placed over the fire or cooked directly on a grid. Also used were frying pans (pensa), deeper pans (patella and patina), mixing bowls (mortaria) with a spout for pouring.

The recipe given here is not meant to be cooked in a modern kitchen but on an open fire or on a charcoal grill. Roman cooks judged quantities by eye so measurements are not given. Apicius provides the ingredients for the sauce, this then accompanies pan- fried meat.

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Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

An orange flavoured dessert recipe found in
“150 New Ways to Serve Ice Cream”
published by  Sealtest System Laboratories Inc in 1936

Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

The old fashioned “dowdy” that our grandmothers used to serve was a simple bread and fruit pudding. Many of us still have tantalizing memories of it. This 1930s version comes to us in a new guise.

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Butter Pecan Gaufrettes / Krokan Gaufrettes

A dessert recipe found in “150 New Ways to Serve Ice Cream” published by Sealtest System Laboratories Inc in 1936Butter Pecan Gaufrettes / Krokan Gaufrettes

Waffles are usually dismissed at the breakfast table as “mere waffles” in the US. To the French, who have a way of glorifying things, they are also widely used as part of the dessert, and are called “gaufrettes,” which is rather glorified in sound, and glorious to taste.

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Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

A traditional Norwegian dish found on matprat.no
Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

Traditional food with an asumed origin from Western Norway. These days, this dish is eaten all over the country, and every “stewed fish family” have their own recipe. Some people use plain cod or stock fish instead of lightly salted cod. Some families may swear to pollock, but there is one thing they all have in common. A really tasty meal.

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Old-Fashioned Codfish Dinner / Gammeldags Torskemiddag

A fish dinner recipe found in “Old Gloucester Sea Food Recipes”
published by Frank E Davis Fish Company in 1932

Old-Fashioned Codfish Dinner / Gammeldags Torskemiddag

If this dish was old-fashioned back in 1932 it sure is today. An unfamiliar way to serve cod for a Scandinavian, but it does sound delicious. Apart from the beets and onion it sound a little like what we call “Plukkfisk” in Norway – Ted

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Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

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