Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

A quickly cooked dinner found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

Hungarian bean soup is filling dinner and it is cooked in no time.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

British Fry-Up / Britisk Fry-Up

A real classic British breakfast recipe found in a booklet published by gilde.no
697_british_fry-up_intro

It was somewhat strange to find such an utter British dish in a booklet from a Norwegian meat supplier, but so what. I’m a real sucker for a solid breakfast and always go for the full english when in Britiain. Continental is for sissies – Ted  😉

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

A quick breakfast recipe found on BBCgoodfood
One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

This combines all the best ingredients of a traditional English breakfast in one frying pan, with no need to chop anything.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Roasted Sausage Sticks / Ristede Pølsestaver

A seventies snack recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skandinavisk Press in 1977

ristede polsestaver_post

Sometimes in the early seventies the dip craze reached my humble neck of the woods. There was nothing the dips could not contain and likewise there was not a thing we couldn’t dip in them. Luckily it stabilized up through the decade till both dips and the stuff we dipped in them seamed more reasonable – Ted 😉

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Gourmet Sausages with Triple Topping / Gourmetpølser med Trippel Topping

A couple of great hot dog topping found on  matprat.nogourmetpølser med trippel topping_post

Hot Dogs are always popular, quick to cook on the grill and with a couple of homemade toppings like the ones in this recipe and you have a sure winner. A few ice cold beers and sodas for the young ones and a mixed salad and you’ve got a complete meal.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Hiking Muffins / Nistemuffins

A recipe from a promotion leaflet published by gilde.no
696_nistemuffins_intro

I guess the name of the post and the picnic marking on the picture might seem a little confusing but it should at least cover both kinds of outdoor eating. I know that we Norwegians are more keen on hiking than most, so if you prefer to bring these muffins for a picnic rather than on a hike that is no skin off my nose – Ted  😉

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

The History of Hot Dogs

hotdog_01

To most of us, hot dogs are intrinsically linked with the USA and baseball, but as with many foods, where they end up being the most popular doesn’t necessarily prove their origins.

What is a Hot Dog?

hotdog_03In most parts of the world, the term “hot dog” refers to a cooked, smoled, or cured sausage served in 0a soft long roll with or without relishes. The type of sausage is of some importance in order to call what you’re eating a  “hot dog”.  They are usually frankfurters, also known as Franks, Wieners, Weenies, Dachshunds, Wiener Würstchen, or Frankfurter Würstel.  Also, the bread in which the frankfurter is sold should be a long roll so that the sausage is (mostly) encased in the bread.

Now, some may disagree with the above definition, preferring to refer to just the sausage as a hot dog, however if that were the case then certainly, they were not invented in the USA .

hotdog_06Although the Frankfurter is thought to get its name from Frankfurt in Germany, there are also claims that the sausage known as a “dachshund” or “little-dog” was created in the late 1600’s by Johann Georghehner in Coburg, Germany. However, Frankfurt defends their claim, so much so that in 1987 its  500th birthday was celebrated in Frankfurt.

To muddy the waters even further, Vienna (Wien) in Austria also lays claim to the invention,  using the term “wiener” to prove Vienna as the birthplace of the sausage.

Who Invented the Hot Dog

hotdog_02Assuming our definition of what a hot dog is is accepted, the term “hot dog” was first coined in 1901 at the New York Polo Grounds. The story goes that on a cold day in April,  a man called Harry Stevens was losing money trying to sell ice cream and ice cold soda so he sent his staff out to buy  all the dachshund sausages they could find, together with an equal number of rolls and began selling them  from hotdog_05portable hot water tanks with the hawkers attracting customers by shouting  “Get your dachshund sausages while they’re red hot!”

A sports cartoonist called Tad Dorgan upon hearing the sellers,  drew a cartoon of dachschund sausages in rolls barking like dogs and as he wasn’t sure of the spelling of “dachshund” he just put in the caption “hot dog!”  The cartoon was a hit and the term “hot dog” was born.

hotdog_07The hot dog in a long bun as it is today,  is attributed to a Bavarian concessionaire, Anton Feuchtwanger who introduced it   in 1904 during the St. Louis “Louisiana Purchase Exposition”.  The story goes that he initially loaned white gloves to his customers to hold his hot sausages however, when most of the gloves weren’t returned,  his brother-in-law who was a baker,  made up long soft rolls to hold the sausages.

So, depending on your definition of what a hot dog is, it’s either definitely American or of indeterminate origin.

Foil Wrapped Hiking Food / Foliepakket Turmat

A great idea for the hikers out there found on joker.no
Foliepakket turmat_joker_post

When going on a hike your backpack quickly gets full and heavy, you quickly becomes aware of what the things you bring really weights. Then you may want to bring readymade packages like this. This food is great fuel for a hungry and tired body.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Corn Dogs / Innbakte Frityrstekte Pølser

A fairground classic recipe found on lostrecipesfound.com
Corn Dogs_lostrecipesfound_post

Here’s a little-known fact: Early corn-dog purveyor Ed Waldmire, Jr., wanted to call his corn-dog stand “The Crusty Cur”….his wife convinced him to change the name to “Cozy Pup.”  Like most other American fried-food-on-a-stick, batter-fried weiner wands have state fair connections.

Vaudeville actors Carl and Neil Fletcher abandoned their Dallas song-and-dance act tent show in 1938 when the Texas State Fair offered them the chance to operate a food booth. The two had read about a man in the Oaklawn neighbourhood of Dallas who was baking corn-battered hotdogs in moulds, and the idea intrigued them, so the brothers set out to improve on the product. They perfected their batter-dipped and fried corn dog in time for the 1942 Texas State Fair.

Easy, portable and quick, corn dogs soon became fast-food-restaurant darlings. Cozy Dog Drive-in in Springfield, IL claims first-to-market status (1946) but restaurateur Dave Barham started selling at Hot Dog on a Stick in Santa Monica, CA, that same year.

000_recipe_eng  traditional badge american  000_recipe_nor

Baconista Brats with Tangy Western Slaw / Baconista Brats med Tangy Western Slaw

A smashing barbeque recipe found on BetterHomes&Gardens
Baconista Brats_post

Marinate bratwursts in spiced-up German beer for a flavour boost that
can only be topped by the bacon that’s later wrapped
around the sausages before grilling.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Tempting Sandwich Basket / Frestande Smörgåskorg

Three recipes from “Stora boken om Smörgåsar och Smörgåstårtor” (The Big Book on Sandwiches and Sandwich Cakes) published by ICA Bokförlag in 1985
frestande smörgåskorg_post

traditional badge swedish_flatThe Scandinavian open sandwich (Danish: smørrebrød, Norwegian: smørbrød, Swedish: smörgås or macka) consists of one piece of buttered bread, often whole-grain rye bread (Danish & Norwegian: rugbrød, Swedish: rågbröd), topped with, for instance, cheese, cold steak, shrimps, smoked salmon, caviar, hard boiled eggs, bacon, herring, fish fillets, liver pâté (Danish: leverpostej, Norwegian: leverpostei Swedish: leverpastej), and/or small meatballs. This is typically complemented by some herbs and vegetables such as parsley, cold salad, thinly sliced cucumber, tomato wedges and/or pickled beets etc. on the same slice of bread.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_sve

Condiments, such as mayonnaise, or mayonnaise-based dressing is also often included in some form. An old traditional replacement for butter on a piece of bread with herring is pork fat. There are many variations associated with the smørrebrød/smørbrød/smörgås and there are even special stores, cafés and restaurants (especially in Denmark) that specialize in them.

Flûte Bernando

An evening snack found in the “Småretter og Salater”
(Snacks and Salads) part of the Danish
International food encyclopedia MENU published in 1975

flûte bernardo_post

I’m not quite sure where that ever so French name on this evening snack comes from, it looks very Danish to me. A baguette, some cheese and a little sausage and any Dane can put together a mouth watering dish, perfect company for a dew fresh Tuborg or a Carlsberg – Ted

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_dan

Bratwürst in Beer / Bratwürst i Øl

A recipe from “Mat for Ølvenner” (Food for Beer Lovers)
published in 1987

bratwurst_post_thumb[2]

A cookbook about beer without a recipe from Germany would be unthinkable, so why not just choose “Bratwürst mit Sauerkraut und Apfel”? In Germany, people are much better at using a splash of beer in the food and a few glasses of the same when the dish is done than people are most other places.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Frankfurters in Lager with Two Nice Accessories / Pølser i Pilsner med To Gode Tilbehør

A few nice recipes from a folder published by Gilde697_pølser i pilsner med to gode tilbehør_intro

Norwegians eat frankfurteres and weiners like there is no tomorrow. Usually we just slap them in a bun and put some ketchup and mustard on them. Here’s a recipe with a bit more panache – Ted

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

The Hunter Midnight Snack / Jegerens Nattmat

A recipe for a tasty evening meal found on frukt.no
250_Jegerens nattmat_post

This dish is based on a German variation on the Scandinavian sour cabbage; fried cabbage with bacon and cooked in dark beer. A tasteful evening snack for hungry hunters or weary skiers.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor