Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

A flashback from the seventies found on “European Favourites” published by Collins in 1973
Nordic Dip / Nordisk Dipp

This may very well be a Nordic kind of dip from the early seventies. Paprika was high fashion among the cooking savoir faire back then and you risked getting celery in dishes where they far from belonged. Probably because some local health guru had sworn to its many benefits.

I can even remember a tv ad proclaiming celery’s magnificence as snacks. With this dip you could actually end up dipping pieces of celery in a dip containing celery. I’ve said it before, those were hard times back then.

To make it even worse, the horrid disco music  was lurking in the near future. A few years later you could actually risk sitting somewhere overdosing on celery listening to that horrible music. – Ted

Winking smile
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Beef Stew With Potatoes From Southern Sweden / Skånsk Kalops Med Potatis

A classic Swedish dinner recipe found on receptfavoriter.se
Beef Stew With Potatoes From Southern Sweden / Skånsk Kalops Med Potatis

Classic Swedish beef stew flavored with allspice. Here with carrots but they can be excluded. Most taste and real flavour is obtained with meat on the bone. Regular stew meat will do as well but then you may need to add stock cube for more flavour.

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Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

A classic Swedish dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Beef à la Rydberg / Biff á la Rydberg

This classic dish is from old Hotel Rydberg in Stockholm. A nice party dish when one is willing to go for beef fillet, because beef fillet is needed in this case. But one does not have to use the very finest fillets, since the meat should be cut into pieces.

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Apple Pork / Epleflesk

A Swedish dinner recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

epleflesk_post

This is an old and popular dish in Sweden, but for Mrs. Newlywed, it might just be a première. (Top text of the recipe)

Isn’t it strange that even at the end a seventies there was no discussion about who belonged in the kitchen, it was the lady of the house – Ted  😉

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Beer Cake / Ølkake

A classic Scandinavian cake recipe found on droetker.no
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Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Glögg

With background info, recipes, and where to find Scandinavia’s beloved holiday drink in the Bay Area.

Article by By Luke Tsai posted in East Bay Express, November 26 2014

Glögg_01

Many Christmases ago, a coworker with a vague Norwegian affiliation first poured me a steaming hot, boozy, sweet, crimson-red concoction so loaded with the fragrance of cloves, cinnamon, and cardamom, it was as though he’d emptied the contents of his winter spice cabinet into the mug.

Glögg_02It was glögg, the traditional mulled wine beverage that’s wildly popular throughout Scandinavia. But here in the Bay Area, glögg — pronounced, roughly, like “glug” — is still largely unknown.

Slowly, though, that’s starting to change, thanks in part to the efforts of a homesick Swede, a beloved Scandinavian specialty shop, and a restaurant looking to expand beyond its typically all-American cocktail selection.

Martin Geijer started his San Francisco-based company, Geijer Glögg, which produces a glögg liqueur, in large part because he was homesick for the stuff. Geijer explained that in his native Sweden, the drink is rooted in the winter season, when everyone is chilled to the bone. “It really is bloody cold,” he said. Alcohol makes you feel warmer — and all the better if it’s served hot and infused with comforting winter spices.

Glögg_05Here in the East Bay, throwing a glögg party can be as simple as picking up a bottle of pre-mixed glögg concentrate, and it should come as no surprise that Berkeley’s Nordic House (2709 San Pablo Ave.) — the Bay Area’s repository for all things Scandinavian — is the place to go. For $7.95, you can snag a bottle of Saturnus, a popular Swedish brand. To make a batch of glögg, pour the concentrate into a pot along with the cheapest bottle of dry red wine you have on hand. (Nordic House owner Pia Klausen favors a Gallo burgundy.) While this heats up, add raisins, almond slivers, and fresh orange peel. Serve the glögg hot, providing spoons for your guests so they can scoop up the raisins, which will plump as they cook, absorbing all of the sweet, boozy goodness.

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As an alternative to the bottled concentrate, Nordic House also carries a house-made glögg spice mix ($3.95) that consists of cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, orange peel, and raisins. You add that to two bottles’ worth of wine and let the mixture sit overnight. When you’re ready to heat it up, add sugar and, if you like, some blanched almonds at the very end. This method takes a bit more advance planning, but according to Klausen, it’s worth it — the spices won’t be as intense with the pre-bottled version.

Glögg_07If you’ve had glögg before, it was probably very similar to the kind that Klausen describes. But Martin Geijer’s family recipe, passed down to him by his father, involved infusing the traditional spices into a highly concentrated neutral spirit rather than the more typical red wine base. Starting last year, Geijer has enlisted Alameda’s St. George Spirits to distill a version of his family recipe. The result, Geiger Glögg, retails for $32 a bottle and is, according to Geijer, the world’s first glögg liqueur. (Apparently, in Sweden the tax code makes producing a non-wine-based product unfeasible from an economic standpoint.)

Glögg_06According to Geijer, the benefits of drinking glögg in this liqueur form are twofold: The spices are more prominent when there’s no wine flavor to cover them up, and, at 20 percent ABV, the liqueur packs a bigger punch than a traditional mulled wine.

You can heat it up in a pot or kettle, the same way you would a bottle of sake. But Geijer said the liqueur can be treated like any other spirit — served cold or at room temperature, either neat or mixed into a cocktail such as a Stockholm Sour: one part liqueur, one part bourbon, a half part fresh lemon juice, and a quarter part simple syrup, all mixed together in a cocktail shaker.

For more ambitious glögg-inspired cocktails, you might look to the handful of Bay Area restaurants that carry Geijer Glögg, including Hutch (2022 Telegraph Ave.), a Southern restaurant in Uptown Oakland whose bar program otherwise focuses almost exclusively on American whiskey. But owner David King explained that he was introduced to the pleasures of glögg when he was working as a chef in Copenhagen.

Glögg_08“Once it’s cold as it is in Denmark in December and January, it’s one of the best things you can put in your body,” King said.

King and his bar manager, Joshua Sexton, are hoping customers will warm up to a holiday cocktail that they recently added to the menu — a milk punch, served hot, that King said will be somewhat akin to a Brandy Alexander, which is traditionally made by mixing brandy, milk, crème de cacao, and spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg. In Hutch’s version, the glögg liqueur adds an extra boost of spice, resulting in something akin to a Christmas-y hot toddy — perfect for the holidays.

Glögg_03You probably want to know how the stuff tastes. I sampled a bottle of Geijer Glögg, and the first thing I noticed was the smell of cinnamon, which was potent enough that it wafted up through the unopened cap. The liqueur had a lovely golden-amber hue and, when I drank it, a honeyed sweetness followed by a spicy kick. The overall effect was not unlike a boozy distillation of Big Red chewing gum.

When you heat the glögg up — in the office microwave, in my case — the intensity doubles or triples. By the second sip, there was a pronounced warmth in my belly. On a frigid (by Bay Area standards) winter evening, I could see myself going back for a second cup, and then a third.

The Christmas Recipes – Part 26

The Christmas Recipes – Part 26

Norwegian Pork Rib “Sylte” / Ribbesylte

Norwegian Pork Rib “Sylte” / Ribbesylte

Danish Spice Cake / Dansk Krydderikage

Danish Spice Cake / Dansk Krydderikage

Old Lady’s Spread on Pumpernickel / Tantröra på Pumpernickel

A classic Swedish starter recipe found on koket.se
Tantröra på pumpernickel_post

Nice little starter with smoked salmon, potatoes, eggs, and pickles. Can be served to old geezers too, but they do have their own spread called Punter’s Mix as well.

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How to Make Aquavit / Slik Lager Du Akevitt Hjemme

A spicy liquor recipe found on britishfood.about.com
How to Make Aquavit / Slik Lager Du Akevitt Hjemme

Comments to the recipe: Aquavit is a Scandinavian liquor with just as long traditions as Russian and Polish vodka, so please don’t offend the whole of Scandinavia by saying that aquavit is a sort of flavoured vodka. Aquavit was first mentioned in writing in 1531 and there are 91 different aquavits produced in Scandinavia today. The only thing they have in common is that both aquavit and vodka was potato based as soon as potatoes were grown here and not made from grain (grain was to valuable this far north). And by the way, the dill plants is never used to flavour aquavit, it is dill seeds that are used and real aquavit lovers never, ever drink their aquavit chilled, it kills most of the flavours.

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Swedish Cardamom Cakes / Kardemummakakor

A classic Swedish Cake recipe found on godmat.org
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“Stompa” – Swedish Pan Fried Bread / Stekpannebröd

A quickly made Swedish pan fried bread recipe
found on
koket.se
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This is a super nice pan fried bread done with baking soda. The dough do not need to rise, just roll out the dough in rounds and place in the frying pan.

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Danish Pork Roast with Browned Potatoes / Dansk Svinestek med Brunede Poteter

A classic Danish dinner recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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If you’ve never tried to brown potatoes like the Danish do you’re
in for a real treat. They are absolutely delicious.

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Million Mince with Mash / Millionbøf med Mos

A classic Danish lunch/dinner recipe found on familiejournal.dk
Million Mince with Mash / Millionbøf med Mos

Million mince is a delicious dish and it is very easy to make. When many ingredients are allowed to simmer with the meat, you get an incredibly nice mince that tastes great.

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Cabaret / Kabaret

A classic Scandinavian recipe found at Jacobs.noCabaret_post

A traditional dish from Scandinavian smorgasbords. usually served with fresh white bread and remulade sauce. Cabaret was frequently on the coffee table on the weekends in my childhood home. Usually we ate it while we watching the weekend entertainment on television.

I must confess that I’ve never made it myself or even eaten it since, although I enjoyed it a lot back then – Ted 🙂

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Whole Grain Rolls / Helkornrundstykker

A classic Danish recipe from “Spennende Mat” (Exiting Food)
published by Skandinavisk Presse in 1980

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Nothing beats warm, freshly baked whole grain rolls. Bake a big portion and put some in the freezer. Pick out a few rolls, warm them and enjoy the smell of fresh bakery even on a stressful Monday morning.

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