Medieval Monday – Sweet Frumenty / Søt Frumenty

A Twelfth Night side dish recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
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This is a standard dish appearing in many variations over the centuries. It makes a lovely side dish, especially with strongly flavoured meats. It was a symbolic dish in winter, a sign that spring would come. It later came to be served as a festival dish on Twelfth Night (5th of January).

This is the original recipe:

‘To make frumente. Tak clene whete & braye yt wel in a morter tyl the holes gon of; seethe it til it breste in water. Nym it up & lat it cole. Tak good broth & swete mylk of kyn or of almand & tempere it therwith. Nym yelkes of eyren rawe & saffroun & cast therto; salt it: lat it naught boyle after the etren ben cast therinne. Messe it forth.’

(Curye on Inglysch CI.IV.i.)

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Medieval Monday – Perre

A Medieval sidedish resipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
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Take green peas, and boil them in a pot; And when they are broken, draw the broth a good quantity through a strainer into a pot, And sit it on the fire; and take onions and parsley, and hew them small together, And cast them thereto; And take powder of Cinnamon and pepper and cast thereto, and let boil; And take vinegar and powder of ginger, and cast thereto; And then take Saffron and salt, a little quantity, and cast thereto; And take fair pieces of pandemaine, or else of such tender bread, and cut it in fair morsels, and cast thereto; And serve it so forth.

From Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II

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Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

A classic Norwegian side dish recipe found on frukt.no
Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

Stewed cabbage is a classic Norwegian side dish that you easily make yourself. It is usually served with meat balls, dinner sausages and any sort of smoked meat.

You can buy packages of half finished stewed cabbage (cooked, dried cabbage flakes and the dry ingredients for the sauce) at most grocers here in Norway, but the result is nothing compared with what you get if you cook stewed cabbage from scratch yourself.

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Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A quick and easy potato recipe found in “Woman’s Day Best Casseroles To¨Make” published in 1973
Chantilly Potatoes / Chantilly Poteter

A great way to use up leftovers and very versatile. Quick and easy comfort food. Serve the potatoes with a salad and meat leftovers for a great meal.

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Herbed Garlic Bread / Urtekrydret Hvitløksbrød

A spicy sidedish recipe found on cookingchanneltv.com
Herbed Garlic Bread / Urtekrydret Hvitløksbrød

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Duchess Potatoes / Duchessepoteter

A great way to serve potatoes found on frukt.no
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Duchess Potatoes are mashed potatoes with added egg yolks, shaped with piping bag or knife and then roasted in the oven. A decorative new twist to your dinner.

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Pazun Ngabuang Kyaw – Burmese Shrimp Balls / Burmesiske Rekeboller

A Burmese speciality found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(Asia – A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987

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These small balls are usually eaten as a side dish to mohinga, but are also served as a snack or as side dish with other dishes. They can also be made with fish.

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Apples and Yams / Epler og Yams

A recipe from “Are You Hungry Tonight?” published in 1992apples and jams_post

Ask anybody south of the Mason-Dixon line to talk about side dishes and yams always come up. This variation on the usual theme brings together two of the King’s favorites.

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Yam is the common name for some plant species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae) that form edible tubers.

yamsThese are perennial herbaceous vines cultivated for the consumption of their starchy tubers in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and Oceania. There are many cultivars of yam. Although some varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) are also called yam in parts of the United States and Canada, sweet potato is not part of the family Dioscoreaceae but belongs in the unrelated morning glory family Convolvulaceae.

Yams are monocots, related to lilies and grasses. Native to Africa and Asia, yam tubers vary in size from that of a small potato to over 60 kg (130 lb). There are over 600 varieties of yams and 95 percent of these crops are grown in Africa.

The differences between true yam and sweet potato “yam”

Yams are a monocot (a plant having one embryonic seed leaf) and from the Dioscoreaceae family. Sweet Potatoes are a dicot (a plant having two embryonic seed leaves) and are from the Convolvulaceae family. Therefore, they are about as distantly related as two flowering plants can be. Culinarily, yams are starchier and drier than sweet potatoes. The table below lists some differences between yam and sweet potato.

Fried Smashed Potatoes / Stekt Knuste Poteter

A fancy take on fried potatoes found on bhg.com/recipes/Fried Smashed Potatoes_post

Parmesan and parsley dress up these simple smashed potatoes for a flavorful side dish. Scrub the potatoes and combine parmesan and parsley the night before to cut down on preperation time.

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Ymer Potato Salad / Ymer-Kartoffelsalat

A classic Danish salad found in “God Mat – Let at Lave”
(Nice Food – Easy To Make) published in 1976
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Ymer is a Danish soured milk product which has been known since 1930. It is made by fermenting whole milk with the bacterial culture Lactococcus lactis. When producing fermented milk products such as yogurt, ymer, filmjölk, skyr, qvark and A-38, and also when producing cheese, one can add lactic acid bacteria which convert milk sugar in the milk into lactic acid and other substances. Acidity makes the milk thicker, gives it a tart flavor, and increases the shelf life by several days.

Ymer is named after the primordial being Ymir in Norse mythology. In 1937, dairy farmer E. Larsen in Hatting registered his new soured milk product as ymer; the name was then used by other dairies that began making the product.

Ymer is made with the help of a starter culture, which is added to skimmed milk (milk whose fat content is typically 0.1% and generally no higher than 0.5%). It is kept at 18° C until the pH drops to 4.6. The serum is broken down and drained after fermentation, and cream is added.

Unlike other fermented milk products, ymer is drained of its whey. That means that ymer has a higher content of solids, including protein, while the fat content stays at 3.5% as in whole milk.

Ymer is used in breakfasts, snacks, desserts, dressings and baking. The traditional breakfast topping is ymerdrys (“ymer sprinkle”), which is a mix of rugbrød breadcrumbs and brown sugar.

1 deciliter of ymer contains 146 kJ (35 kilocalories). It can be substituded with sour cream if impossible to get hold of.

Champignons à la Greque / Sjampinjonger à la Greque

A great side dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978
 
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The restaurant chefs writes: In our opinion, an excellent way to cook champignons. This dish may be made well in advance. It keeps well in the refrigerator.

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Koussa Mehché – Stuffed Courgettes / Fylte Courgetter

A recipe from the Middle East found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970.

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In context

The courgette is a variety of cucurtbit, which means it’s from the same family as cucumber, squash and melon. It is the most popular Courgettes-2_crvegetable of the squash family, being extremely versatile, tender and easy to cook. Just don’t boil them! They have a deep green skin with firm pale flesh and are also known as zucchini.

Availability Courgettes are at their best from June until September. Choose the best Choose small courgettes that are firm to touch with a glossy, unblemished skin. Avoid soft, squishy courgettes.

Prepare it Courgettes do not need peeling. Slice off each end and prepare as recipe directs. It’s best not to boil, as they will become mushy and lose their flavour. Instead lightly sauté in butter or oil and a small amount of water.

Store it Refrigerate in a vegetable storage bag in the crisper compartment and eat within 2-3 days.

Cook it Try courgettes sliced thinly and eaten raw, cooked on a griddle, in a stir fry, or fried in a light batter as chips.

Alternatives Try squash or marrow.

Spicy Croquettes / Krydderkroketter

A nice recipe found in “Sommermat” (Summer food)
published by Hjemmets Bokklubb in 1981

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Leave out the ham and you might have a nice vegetarian dish here depending on how vegetarian your diet is. There are eggs and cheese here as well and if you leave those out too there isn’t much left to set your teeth into –Ted 😉

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Vegetable Patties / Grønnsakpletter

A nice vegetable side dish or light lunch recipe from
“Mat Som Smaker” (Tasty Food) published in 1968

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Exciting Raw Vegetable Dish / Spennende Råkost

A nice vegetarian lunch dich from “Lettvint For Små Familier” (Easy For Small Families) published by
Hjemmets Bokklubb in 1979

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This dish can be served as a light lunch with wholemeal bread, or it can be used as a starter or accessory for a fish dish. Even common fishfingers will rise to the occation if paired with these vegetables.

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