Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

A youth party suggestion with menu and recipes found in
“Vi Skal Ha Gjester” (We’re Having Guests)
published by Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag in 1969

Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

I found working with the last post so entertaining that I just had to do another post from the same book although both are more more work than most posts. Because if you think arranging a party for your young ones would provide less problems than serving crabs to a couple of friends you are absolutely mistaken.

The set of worries maybe different, but the chance of ending with egg on your face was indeed present. And all the worries about what would happen to your furniture and floors came on top of that.


I was sixteen in 1969 and I must admit that the parties I went to back then were home-alone-parties that didn’t have the slightest likeness to the parties described in this book. If not totally Sex Drugs & Rock’n’Roll we were close enough.

Ted
Winking smile

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Orange Soup With Pannacotta / Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Orange Soup With Pannacotta /
Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A traitional Norwegian sweet soup recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no
Barley Cordial Soup / Byggryns Saftsuppe

A nourishing and hearty soup. Often used both before or after the main course during the week in Norway in the old days.

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British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

A classic British soup recipe found on goodhousekeeping.co.uk
British Onion Soup with Red Leicester Toast / British Løksuppe med Rød Leicester Toast

Mouth-watering Red Leicester toasts are the perfect accompaniment to this fabulous British onion soup.

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Dublin Bay Prawn Bisque / Dublin Bay Kremet Rekesuppe

An updated Irish classic recipe found on delish.com
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Creamy and spicy, this update on the classic Irish soup will impress any foodie and is hearty enough to be a meal in itself.

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Warm Raspberry Soup with Pear Salad and Waffles / Varm Bringebærsuppe med Pæresalat og Vafler

A great dessert soup recipe found on kiwi.noVarm bringebærsuppe med pæresalat og vafler_post

Extend the summer feeling a little with this fresh
and varm raspberry soup.

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Simple Onion Soup with Red Wine / Enkel Løksuppe med Rødvin

A classic soup recipe found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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This was one of the first dishes I ever made all by myself. I was twelve and rather pleased with the result. If you for some reason don’t feel like using red wine, a tart apple juice will do nicely as a substitute –Ted

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Cullen Skink / Fiskesuppe fra Cullen

A traditional Scottish soup recipe found on goodtoknow.co.uk
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Cullen skink is a thick Scottish soup made of smoked haddock, potatoes and onions. An authentic Cullen skink will use finnan haddie (cold-smoked haddock, representative of a regional method of smoking with green wood and peat in north-east Scotland), but it may be prepared with any other undyed smoked haddock.

This soup is a local speciality, from the town of Cullen in Moray, on the north-east coast of Scotland. The soup is often served as a starter at formal Scottish dinners. Cullen skink is widely served as an everyday dish across the northeast of Scotland.

Local recipes for Cullen skink have several slight variations, such as the use of milk instead of water or the addition of single cream. Cullen skink was traditionally served with bread.

It has been described as “smokier and more assertive than American chowder, heartier than classical French bisque.

Cullen skink appears in many traditional Scottish cookery books and appears in numerous restaurants and hotel menus throughout Scotland, the UK, and internationally. In 2012 a Guardian columnist described the dish as “the milky fish soup which has surely replaced your haggises and porridges as Scotland’s signature dish”.

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Southern Chicken Gumbo / Kreolsk Kyllingsuppe

A classic Kreole dish found in ”Soup Beautiful Soup” by
Ursel Norman designed and illustrated by Derek Norman
and published by Morrow in 1982

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Gumbos (poultry, meat, fish or shellfish) are typícal of Creole cookíng with okra added to give the soup its glutinous quality. The soup evolved from a Choctaw Indian dish.

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Belgian Oxtail Soup / Belgisk Oksehalesuppe

A classic soup recipe found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980oksehalesuppe fra belgia_post

Oxtail (occasionally spelled ox tail or ox-tail) is the culinary name for the tail of cattle. Formerly, it referred only to the tail of an ox or steer, a castrated male. An oxtail typically weighs 2 to 4 lbs. (1–1.8 kg) and is skinned and cut into short lengths for sale.

Oxtail is a bony, gelatin-rich meat, which is usually slow-cooked as a stew or braised. It is a traditional stock base for a soup. Although traditional preparations often involve hours of slow cooking, modern methods usually take a shortcut by utilizing a pressure cooker. Oxtail is the main ingredient of the Italian dish coda alla vaccinara.

It is a popular flavour for powder, instant and premade canned soups in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Oxtails are also one of the popular bases for Russian aspic appetizer dishes (холодец or студень), along with pig trotters or ears or cow “knees”, but are the preferred ingredients among Russian Jews because they can be Kosher.

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Mussel Brose / Blåskjellsuppe

A classic Scotish mussel soup recipe found in
“The Cooking of The British Isles” published in 1970

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Mussel Brose or Mussel Broth is a regional dish of Scotland. The word ‘Brose’ was used to mean a thick broth or old-fashioned potage. In Scotland the most common thickener was oatmeal. 

Scotland has very famous mussel beds, producing some of the finest mussels in the world, and if you can source fresh mussels from Scotland they will be wonderful in this broth.

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Oxtail Soup from Belgium / Oksehalesuppe fra Belgia

A classic recipe found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

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Oxtail (occasionally spelled ox tail or ox-tail) is the culinary name for the tail of cattle. Formerly, it referred only to the tail of an ox or steer, a castrated male. An oxtail typically weighs 2 to 4 lbs. (1–1.8 kg) and is skinned and cut into short lengths for sale.

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Wild Garlic Soup / Ramsløksuppe

A traditional Norwegian recipe found on bygdekvinnelaget.no411_Ramsløksuppe_post

Wild garlic (Allium ursinum) is a plant used in cooking. The leaves can be used in salads and as a seasoning in soups and stewed spinach.

Wild garlic is an up to 50 cm/20 in tall plant that smells of garlic and spread out like a white blanket over the forest floor. It is a spring plant and fills the woods with an intense smell of garlic. The onion belonging to each stalk usually has only two leaves and both continue upward in herbal leaf discs. The Wild garlic leaves are much thinner and deeper green than for other types of onion.

Wild garlic growing in Norway in shady fir- and broadleaf forests. Available in the lowlands along the coast from Østfold to Trøndelag.

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