Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

A traditional recipe from Sweden’s southernmost landscape found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance) published by Cappelen in 1991

Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of Swedish foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato sauce and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love that cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butler’s Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

A soup recipe found in “Flavours of Hungary Recipes”
a free E-book publiched by the Hungarian
Agricultural Marketing Centre in 2009Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

Proper ingredients are necessary but not sufficient for full success. The Hungarian “art de la table” does not only cover the ingredients but also the method of preparation. The special flavours of the traditional Hungarian cuisine are produced by the combination of tasty ingredients of excellent quality with their specific mode of preparation.

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More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remedies

An article by Stephanie Butler posted in
Hungry History at history.com June 2015

It’s likely you’ve heard the adage “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” and everyone knows about the reputed healing powers of a More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediessteaming bowl of chicken soup. But would you think to place potato slices on a fever-stricken patient’s forehead? Or shampoo with mayonnaise to give your mane that healthy shine? Foods have been used as medicine since our Neolithic ancestors ate mosses with antibiotic properties to help heal wounds. It’s a long road from healing mosses to zinc lozenges, so let’s take a look at the world of food remedies.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food RemediesSeveral hundred years before Alexander Fleming discovered the benefits of penicillin, European housewives kept moldy loaves of bread hidden in their kitchen cabinets. When a family member got a cut or scrape, they would break off bits of the moldy bread, mix it with water to form a paste and paint it over wounds. This method was hardly a cure-all, since it depended on the natural presence of penicillium or other antiseptic molds to be beneficial. But when it did work, the bread treatment must have seemed like a godsend in a world lacking even a basic understanding of how diseases spread.

These medical dark ages lasted far too long for many patients. From the medieval era all the way up through World War I, wartime was especially harrowing for patients and doctors. During the Civil War, for More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediesinstance, more men died from disease than on the battlefield. People resorted to food- and plant-based remedies because demand for more scientific medicines far outstripped supply. For example, both Northern and Southern troops placed poultices of cooked onions and garlic on their chests to combat croup and congestion. In 1863, Alabama’s Mobile Register gave a delicious-sounding recipe for blackberry cordial that promised to “alleviate the suffering and perhaps save the lives of many of our soldiers” who were sickened by drinking typhus-contaminated water. Baking soda was administered to treat upset stomachs, and sprained limbs were often soaked in salt solutions, a practice that continues today. For amputations, unlucky soldiers were often given wooden spoons—not to cook with, of course, but to clench in their teeth.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remedies

At the same time, an ocean away, England was experiencing a true golden age of food remedies. Modern medical breakthroughs like pasteurization (in 1862) and the stethoscope (in 1852) were finally More Than Chicken Soup: Food Remediesbeginning to catch up with kitchen cures, creating a uniquely British blend of folk wisdom and scientific method—the apothecary shop. Modern treatments like morphine, laudanum and chloroform found places on apothecary shelves right next to rosemary tinctures and essence of sage. Receipt books from the period show a real appreciation for the healing powers of lard, which could soothe chapped hands, ease inflammations and help repair burns. Herbs were used liberally in the Victorian home: Dill water could calm a colicky baby, lovage and peppermint were brewed into teas to cure upset stomachs and rosemary-infused alcohol was used for pain. Looking through Victorian medical books, we can see many treatments still familiar to us today. Add two handfuls of oats into a warm bath, for instance, and eczema and chickenpox sufferers would itch no more.

More Than Chicken Soup: Food RemediesBut what about the proverbial apples and chicken soup? Do they really work as well as folk wisdom seems to dictate? While an apple a day certainly won’t guarantee perfect health, apple extract has been shown to decrease cancer cell growth dramatically. Just don’t forget to eat the peel—that’s where most of the beneficial nutrients are found. And a 2000 study demonstrated that chicken soup does indeed have anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce cold symptoms. As for lard salve and onion poultices, however, the jury’s still out.

Potato Soup with Smoked Sausages / Potetsuppe med Røkte Pølser

A recipe for a hearty soup found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups
and Sauces) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Potato Soup with Smoked Sausages / Potetsuppe med Røkte Pølser

One can find different recipes for soups like this throughout Scandinavia. In the old days, soup was often the only thing one could afford to make so it was important that it was hearty. The smoked sausages could be exchanged with cheap cuts of meat or poultry. Or in hard times, be left out completely, leaving the potatoes to save the day.

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Fish Soup with Cod and Tomatoes / Fiskesuppe med Torsk og Tomater

A  filling soup recipe found in “Torsk til Hverdag
og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Party) a free cookbook  published by Godfisk!

Fish Soup with Cod and Tomatoes / Fiskesuppe med Torsk og Tomater

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also perfect for party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good atmosphere is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod suits perfectly for both everydays and party.

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Cauliflower Soup with Trout and Dill / Blomkålsuppe med Ørret og Dill

A delicate and filling soup recipe found on kiwi.no
Cauliflower Soup with Trout and Dill / Blomkålsuppe med Ørret og Dill

Let the fish simmer for a few minutes in the saucepan before serving the soup garnished with dill and lemon wedges.

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Pea, Marjoram and Mascarpone Soup/ Erter-, Merian- og Mascarponesuppe

A filling soup recipe found in “90 Years of KitchenAid –
The Cook Book” a free E-book published in 2009
Pea, Marjoram and Mascarpone Soup/ Erter-, Merian- og Mascarponesuppe

Green pea soup is a classic spring soup. Replace the marjoram with basil  and the mascarpone with ricotta for a lighter version of this soup.

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Indian Caramelised Onion and Split Pea Soup / Indisk Karamellisert Løk- og Ertesuppe

An Indian vegetarian soup recipe found in “Healthy Recipes
with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by  Dairy Australia

Indian Caramelised Onion and Split Pea Soup / Indisk Karamellisert Løk- og Ertesuppe

I’m not a great fan of Western vegetarian food, I usually find it slightly dreary and dull. But you can serve me any Indian vegetarian dish
and I’ll be a happy man – Ted

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Mexican Chicken Soup / Meksikansk Hønsesuppe

A quick soup recipe found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982Mexican Chicken Soup / Meksikansk Hønsesuppe

The RecipeReminiscing Soup Council strikes again

Ted
Winking smile

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Russian Borsht / Russisk Borsht

A classic Russian dish found in “New Fashion Plates for Your Menu” published by Planters Edible Oil Co in 1932Russian Borsht / Russisk Borsht

Borsjtsj is a traditional dish in Eastern Europe, consisting of a vegetable soup, where the main ingredient usually is beetroot, while the other ingredients may vary. It is assumed that it originally originates from Ukraine.

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Old-fashioned Norwegian Mutton Soup / Gammeldags Kjøttsuppe

An old-fasioned Norwegian soup recipe found on mytaste.no
Old-fashioned Norwegian Mutton Soup / Gammeldags Kjøttsuppe

Good bread and old-fashioned soup is the recipe
for a tasty dinner

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Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

A classic take on fish soup found in “Fisk og Skalldyr”
(Fish and Shellfish) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

Fish soup with vegetables is a delicacy. And it is inexpensive food because the basic broth is made from fish heads, skin and bones.

Here you got a basic recipe, which can be varied with different species of fish. For example, choose cod, haddock, pollock or whiting.

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Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

A quickly cooked dinner found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for
Busy People) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Hungarian Bean Soup / Ungarsk Bønnesuppe

Hungarian bean soup is filling dinner and it is cooked in no time.

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Soup with Shrimp, Corn and Cheese / Suppe Med Reker, Mais og Ost

A recipe found in “Ost i Varme og Kalde Retter” (Cheese in Hot and Cold Dishs) published by Den Norske Bokklubb in 1988
Soup with Shrimp, Corn and Cheese / Suppe Med Reker, Mais og Ost

This is a heavy soup that can be served as a full meal
with butter and rolls.

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Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

A classic soup recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupper Ware in 1970

Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

While it is called “Scotland’s National Soup,” it probably originated as a chicken and onion soup in France. By the 16th century, it had made its way to Scotland, where the onions were replaced with leeks. The first recipe was printed in 1598, though the name “cock-a-leekie” did not come into use until the 18th century.

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