Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

A classic Scndinavian waffle recipe found on aperitif.no
Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

Waffle Day on 25 March is a Swedish invention, and why it is celebrated rests on a misunderstanding. The day is the same as “Vårfruedag” – the day Virgin Mary learns that she is with child. “Vårfruedag” turned over time into “Vaffeldag” (Waffle Day) in Sweden but also here in Norway, it was customary to celebrate “Vårfruedag” with cakes.

Although we feel an ownership to waffles here in Scandinavia, similar cakes are eaten most places in the world. They can be round or square, thick or thin – the heart-shaped waffles is however typical of Scandinavia. The first electric waffle iron was designed by General Electric and entered the market in 1911.

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Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

A Caucasian chicken  recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

The cuisine of the Caucasus includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.

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Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

A classic Egyptian recipe from “God Mat Fra Hele Verden” (Delicious Food From All The World) published by Schibsted in 1971
Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

Stuffed vegetables are known from throughout the Balkans and most other places in the Middle East. Here’s the Egyptian version.

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Norwegian Soft Lefse / Mørlefse

A classic Norwegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
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Soft lefse is soft and sweet and extra nice with cheese. They are cooked on a griddle, and made with sour milk, sour cream, butter and golden syrup. You can also make a wholemeal version that makes for great hiking food.

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Ymer Potato Salad / Ymer-Kartoffelsalat

A classic Danish salad found in “God Mat – Let at Lave”
(Nice Food – Easy To Make) published in 1976
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Ymer is a Danish soured milk product which has been known since 1930. It is made by fermenting whole milk with the bacterial culture Lactococcus lactis. When producing fermented milk products such as yogurt, ymer, filmjölk, skyr, qvark and A-38, and also when producing cheese, one can add lactic acid bacteria which convert milk sugar in the milk into lactic acid and other substances. Acidity makes the milk thicker, gives it a tart flavor, and increases the shelf life by several days.

Ymer is named after the primordial being Ymir in Norse mythology. In 1937, dairy farmer E. Larsen in Hatting registered his new soured milk product as ymer; the name was then used by other dairies that began making the product.

Ymer is made with the help of a starter culture, which is added to skimmed milk (milk whose fat content is typically 0.1% and generally no higher than 0.5%). It is kept at 18° C until the pH drops to 4.6. The serum is broken down and drained after fermentation, and cream is added.

Unlike other fermented milk products, ymer is drained of its whey. That means that ymer has a higher content of solids, including protein, while the fat content stays at 3.5% as in whole milk.

Ymer is used in breakfasts, snacks, desserts, dressings and baking. The traditional breakfast topping is ymerdrys (“ymer sprinkle”), which is a mix of rugbrød breadcrumbs and brown sugar.

1 deciliter of ymer contains 146 kJ (35 kilocalories). It can be substituded with sour cream if impossible to get hold of.

Cured Ham with Summer Cabbage / Spekeskinke med Sommerkål

A classic Norwegian summer dinner found on matprat.no
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Cured meats for dinner has long-standing traditions in Norway. Along with potatoes, cabbage, scrambled eggs or other nice vegetables, it leaves you both satisfied and happy.

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Lobster Lunch / Hummer Lunsj

A fancy lunch recipe found on godt.no
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This is simply a small lobster sandwich. It’s nice fresh bread stuffed with homemade lobster salad; You use good quality hot dog buns or halved baguettes and a fully cooked lobster.

The most complicated part of this dish is to clean the boiled lobster; if you have not done this before, it is quite amazing how much fumbling it might take to get it done  😉

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Mussels Salad with Cheese Sauce / Blåskjellsalat med Ostesaus

A shellfish recipe found on Norsk Ukeblads “Store Salatbok”
(Big Salad Book) published in 1985

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Marine mussels are abundant in the low and mid intertidal zone in temperate seas globally. Other species of marine mussel live in tropical intertidal areas, but not in the same huge numbers as in temperate zones.

Certain species of marine mussels prefer salt marshes or quiet bays, while others thrive in pounding surf, completely covering wave-washed rocks. Some species have colonized abyssal depths near hydrothermal vents. The South African white mussel exceptionally doesn’t bind itself to rocks but burrows into sandy beaches extending two tubes above the sand surface for ingestion of food and water and exhausting wastes.

Freshwater mussels inhabit permanent lakes, rivers, canals and streams throughout the world except in the polar regions. They require a constant source of cool, clean water. They prefer water with a substantial mineral content, using calcium carbonate to build their shells.

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Drunk Raspberry and Passion Fruit Creme / Berusade Hallon Och Passionsfruktscreme

A dessert for grown-ups found on sverigesradio.se632_Berusade hallon och passionsfruktscreme_post

This recipe is from a program on the national Swedish television station. Like most tv stations around the world the Scandinavian ones are full of programs about food these days. I love both cooking and eating food so who am I to complain – Ted 😉

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Dill and Shrimp Pie / Dill- och Räkpaj

A felicious lunch recipe found on recept.nuDill- och räkpaj_recept_se_post

With all this dill, this dish could not be anything but Swedish – Ted  😉

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Chocolate Cake with Liqueur Cream / Sjokoladekake med Likørkrem

A delicious cake recipe from “Festmat” (Party Food)
published by Hjemmets kokebokklubb in 1982
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Pickled Herring and Potatoes / Sill och Potatis

A traditional Swedish recipe found on godmat.org
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Herring and potatoes was poor people’s staple dinner in the old days here in Scandinavia. The sea was full of herring and it could be salted for storing and potatoes were cheap too. But don’t think their dinner plates looked anything like the one on the picture above, because that is party food – Ted

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Crispy Waffles with Cream / Sprø Vafler med Fløte

A recipe from “Det Gode Norske Kjøkken”
(The Good Norwegian Kitchen) published by Gyldendal in 1981
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traditional badge baking_flatMost Norwegians are crazy when it comes to waffles. Very few Norwegians’ homes are without a waffle iron of some sort. I’ve got three, one old fashioned cast iron one of the type you use on the oven top, one electric cast iron one I bought at a jumble sale donkey’s years ago and on new one with non-stick coating. I hardly ever use the new one, but the old electric made of cast iron. It simply make the best waffles.

And Norwegian eat waffles other places than at home too. Around here you don’t run much of a café if you don’t have a large plate full of freshly fried waffles on your counter. Kids love them, grown-ups love them and old people love them –Ted

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Salmon Rose with Chopped Shrimps / Lakserose med Rekehakk

A recipe from “Spennende Mat” (Exiting Food)
published in 1980
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An excellent appetizer. The beautiful colours presenting a prelude to a real banquet. And it tastes delicious, no doubt, with such lovely ingredients.

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