Fish Fillets with Leeks / Fiskefileter med Purre

A lunch recipe found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for People in a Hurry) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982
Fish Fillets with Leeks / Fiskefileter med Purre

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Swedish Shrimp Mousse / Räkmousse

A delicious Swedish starter recipe found on recept.nu
Swedish Shrimp Mousse / Räkmousse

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Two-Ingredient Flatbreads / Flatbrød med To Ingredienser

A simple flatbread recipe found on Better Homes and Gardens
Two-Ingredient Flatbreads / Flatbrød med To Ingredienser

Try adding your favorite flavors like spice mixes or herbs
to these chewy flatbreads.

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Shellfish Soup with Shrimp and Avocado Cream / Skalldyrsuppe med Reker og Avokadokrem

A contemporary take on the classic shrimp soup
found on
 aperitif.no
Shellfish Soup with Shrimp and Avocado Cream / Skalldyrsuppe med Reker og Avokadokrem

With this soup you take full advantage of the shrimp since the shrimp shells are the basis for the broth. If you get leftover shrimps, they will make a nice sandwich for breakfast the next day.

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History of Mustard as a Condiment

An article by Peggy Trowbridge Filippone 
published on
The Spruce

History of Mustard as a CondimentAs a condiment, mustard is ancient. Prepared mustard dates back thousands of years to the early Romans, who used to grind mustard seeds and mix them with wine into a paste not much different from History of Mustard as a Condimentthe prepared mustards we know today. The spice was popular in Europe before the time of the Asian spice trade. It was popular long before pepper.

The Romans took the mustard seed to Gaul, where it was planted in vineyards along with the grapes. It soon became a popular condiment. French monasteries cultivated and sold mustard as early as the ninth century, and the condiment was for sale in Paris by the 13th century.

In the 1770s, mustard took a modern turn when Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon introduced the world to Grey Poupon Dijon mustard.

History of Mustard as a CondimentTheir original store still can be seen in downtown Dijon. 

In 1866, Jeremiah Colman, founder of Colman’s Mustard of England, was appointed as mustard-maker to Queen Victoria. Colman perfected the technique of grinding mustard seeds into a fine powder without creating the heat which brings out the oil.

The oil must not be exposed or the flavor evaporates with the oil.

Mustard Species

There are about 40 species of mustard plants. The three species that are used to make mustard are the black, brown and white mustards. White mustard, which originated in the Mediterranean, is the antecedent of the bright yellow hot dog mustard we are all familiar with. Brown mustard from the Himalayas is familiar as Chinese restaurant mustard, and it serves as the base for most European and American mustards. Black mustard originated in the Middle East and in Asia Minor, where it is still popular. Edible mustard greens are a different species of mustard. The history of cultivation of mustard centers on the seeds, not the greens, which have been credited with originating both in China and Japan.

History of Mustard as a Condiment

Mustard’s Medicinal History

Long ago, mustard was considered a medicinal plant rather than a culinary one. In the sixth century B.C., Greek scientist Pythagoras used mustard as a remedy for scorpion stings. A hundred years later, Hippocrates used mustard in medicines and poultices. Mustard plasters were applied to treat toothaches and a number of other ailments.

Mustard’s Religious History

History of Mustard as a CondimentThe mustard seed is a prominent reference for those of the Christian faith, exemplifying something that is small and insignificant, which when planted, grows in strength and power.

Pope John XII was so fond of mustard that he created a new Vatican position—grand moutardier du pape (mustard-maker to the pope—and promptly filled the post with his nephew. His nephew was from the Dijon region, which soon became the mustard center of the world.

Mustard in Modern Culture

History of Mustard as a CondimentWe all know that losers and quitters can’t cut the mustard (live up to the challenge), and perhaps the reason ballpark mustard is so popular is because pitchers apply mustard to their fastballs to get those strikeouts. The disabling and even lethal chemical weapon known as mustard gas is a synthetic copy based on the volatile nature of mustard oils.

Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Recipe for a spicy everyday dinner found on aperitif.no
 Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Even though it’s a workday, it does not mean you have to eat boring food for that reason. With a simple twist, you can make a traditional dish new and exciting, like with this recipe.

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Sweet and Spicy Chicken Skewers / Søte og Krydret Kyllingspyd

A juicy campfire skewer recipe found at tammileetips.com
Sweet and Spicy Chicken Skewers / Søte og Krydret Kyllingspyd

Grilled sweet and spicy chicken skewers that is so easy to make! Great for the campfire or camp grill! Pineapple, peppers, and chicken grilled together to make a perfect meal.

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Bishop / Bisp

A traditional Norwegian hot drink found on meny.no
Bishop / Bisp

Bishop is traditional Norwegian hot, alcoholic, spicey drink that reminds of gløgg, just that it also contains orange. This is really something to warm a frozen body on those rainy autumn evenings that’s coming soon. Maybe along with some gingerbread with, for example, blue cheese and figs.

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Good Old Fashioned Norwegian Wort Cake / God Gammeldags Vørterkake

A traditional Norwegian baking recipe found on kiwi.no
Good Old Fashioned Norwegian Wort Cake / God Gammeldags Vørterkake

The sediments from beer brewing was the start of the oldest
Norwegian sweet yeast baking. We have eaten  wort cakes
for over 300 years in Norway.

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Norwegian wort beer is a non-alcoholic drink made from water, malt and hops and added carbonic acid. In principle, wort beer is beer that has not been through fermentation. In Norway, wort beer is typically dark, roughly looking like Guinness. Wort beer is brewed by Ringnes, Hansa and Aass today.

Wort beer contains some minerals, malt sugar and some b vitamins. Maltese sugar provides fast energy, and the beer is therefore good as a sport drink. The beer is dark, sweet and with a little taste of hops.

Spice Cake with Strawberries / Krydderkake med Jordbær

En Cake recipe found in “Nye Mesterkokken” (The New Master
Chef) utgitt av Skandinavisk Presse AS i 1974

Spice Cake with Strawberries / Krydderkake med Jordbær

This is a juicy, fresh cake with a nice taste of strawberries, which really makes it different and special. It is all right to use overripe berries, and you can also vary the seasoning as desired.

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Filled Veal on the Grill / Fylt Kalvekjøtt på Grillen

A juicy barbeque recipe found in “Okse- og Kalvekjøtt”
(Beef and Veal) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1978
Filled Veal on the Grill / Fylt Kalvekjøtt på Grillen

Veal is so hard to get hold of in regular grocery shops in Norway
that I’ve started to wonder if the cattle around this neck of the woods are born fully grown. If veal is more accessable where
you live you really should try this recipe

Ted
Winking smile

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Babi Kecap – Balinese Pork Fillet in Soy Sauce / Balinesisk Svinefilet i Soyasaus

A pork recipe found in “Cappelens Internasjonale kjøkken – Indonesia” (Cappelen’s International Kitchen – Indonesia)
published in 1994

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Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colourful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavour. It is diverse, in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 17,508 in the world’s largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia home. Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences. Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important. Indonesia’s cuisine may include rice, noodle and soup dishes in modest local eateries to street-side snacks and top-dollar plates.

In 2011, Indonesian cuisine began to gain worldwide recognition, with three of its popular dishes make it to the list of ‘World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods (Readers’ Pick)’, a worldwide online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International. Rendang top the list as the number one, followed closely by nasi goreng in number two, and satay in number fourteen.

Indonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences. Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. The cuisines of Eastern Indonesia are similar to Polynesian and Melanesian cuisine. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.

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Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

A classic Irish breakfast recipe found on irishcentral.com
Steak and Eggs with Beer and Molasses / Biff og Egg med Pils og Mørk Sirup

Steak and eggs is a dish prepared with beefsteak and eggs as primary ingredients. It is most typically served as a breakfast or brunch food, although it can also be consumed at any mealtime, such as for dinner in the evening.

Ingredients

Various types of beefsteaks can be used, such as rib eye, strip, sirloin and flank, among others. Additional ingredients may include bell pepper, garlic, onion, butter, salt, pepper, seasonings and others. Accompaniments may include various sauces, such as steak sauce, Worcestershire sauce, chimichurri. and others.

Variations

Variations include steak and egg sandwiches, open sandwiches and steak and Eggs Benedict.  A version of steak and egg salad utilizes greens such as arugula, poached eggs and steak.  Vegetarian versions also exist, in which vegetables, such as cauliflower, squash and potatoes, are sliced into thick steaks and served with eggs.

In popular culture

Steak and eggs is the traditional NASA astronaut’s breakfast, first served to Alan Shepard before his flight on May 5, 1961.

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Chicken Burger with Coriander Sauce / Kyllingburger med Koriandersaus

A spicy lunch recipe found on prior.no
Chicken Burger with Coriander Sauce / Kyllingburger med Koriandersaus

Chicken burgers are a nice change from the classic beef burgers
and this spicy version is simply delicious.

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Indian Caramelised Onion and Split Pea Soup / Indisk Karamellisert Løk- og Ertesuppe

An Indian vegetarian soup recipe found in “Healthy Recipes
with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by  Dairy Australia

Indian Caramelised Onion and Split Pea Soup / Indisk Karamellisert Løk- og Ertesuppe

I’m not a great fan of Western vegetarian food, I usually find it slightly dreary and dull. But you can serve me any Indian vegetarian dish
and I’ll be a happy man – Ted

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