Medieval Monday – Powder Fort

A medieval spice mix recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingPowder fort_post

The girl who runs Let Hem Boyle writes: Powder Fort also called powder forte, poudour fort, strong powder. Spice mixtures was very common in medieval cooking. “Forme of Cury” for example has lots of recipes that calls for powder douce or powder fort spice mixtures.

You will find lots of different versions of powder fort on internet and in books. The medieval recipes doesn’t usually tell the exact measures of the spices used in spice mixtures or what kind of spices to use. One way to look for the perfect combination of these spice mixtures is to read the recipes and collect the most suitable spices from other recipes in the same source. If you don’t have access to some of the spices, that doesn’t matter!

Powder fort is a strong and warm spice mixture.

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Potato Pancakes with Crispy Bacon / Potetkaker med Sprøstekt Flesk

A great breakfast recipe found in “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Potetkaker med sptøstekt flesk_post

A simple mixture of potatoes and onions, here transformed into airy potato pancakes with a “crown” of crispy bacon. A lovey smell will spread in the kitchen while you cook them!

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Medieval Monday – Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

A meat free fasting day tart recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
headingMedieval Monday - Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

Four times every year in the Catholic calendar, there were “Ember Days” – consisting of a Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday – when meat was forbidden. Cheese and eggs, however, were allowed. An ‘Ember Day Tart’ therefore was a filling dish served instead of meat on these fasting days. The tarts in the recipe are a little like a sweet quiche.

The recipe uses galingale, it is well worth finding some as its aromatic taste is not easily replaced. You can use ginger as a substitute but this will give heat rather than a more rounded flavour.

The recipe was originally written down as follows:

‘Tart in embre day: take and parboile onynons; presse out the water & hewe hem smale;take brede & bray it in a mortar,and temper it up with ayren; do perto butter, safron, spice and salt and corans & a ltel sugar with powdor douce, and bake it in a trap,& serve it forth.’

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Oysters on Skewers / Østers på Grillspyd

A shellfish dinner recipe foungd on recipes.history.org
Oysters on Skewers / Østers på Grillspyd

Original 18. Century Recipe

“Put a bit of butter into a stew-pan, throw in large oysters and some mushrooms, with pepper, salt, pounded cloves, parsley, and sweet herbs chopped, a dust of flour; stir these about half a minute, then put the oysters on silver skewers, a mushroom between each; roll them in crumbs of bread; broil them; put into the stew-pan a little good gravy, let it be thick and palatable; a little lemon-juice. Serve the oysters on the skewers; the sauce on the dish.”

—From “The lady’s assistant for regulating and supplying the table: being a complete system of cookery… including the fullest and choicest receipts of various kinds.” 

by Charlotte Mason (1787)

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Pakoras – Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

A classic indian potato snack recipe found on madogbolig.dk
Pakoras - Indian Snack With A Great Taste! / Indisk Godbid Med Stor Smag!

Everyone who love Indian food loves pakoras, and if you have not yet tasted this exotic potato dish, then you may just as well start now!

If you are tired of boiled or baked potatoes, then it is time to try this Indian potata dish. Pakoras are slices of baking potatoes wrapped in a batter of chickpea flour, coriander, chili and garlic and deep-fried.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 26

The Christmas Recipes – Part 26

Norwegian Pork Rib “Sylte” / Ribbesylte

Norwegian Pork Rib “Sylte” / Ribbesylte

Danish Spice Cake / Dansk Krydderikage

Danish Spice Cake / Dansk Krydderikage

17th Century Quaking Pudding / Skjelvende Pudding fra det 17ende Århundre

A historic pudding recipe found on Tunspit & Table
17th Century Quaking Pudding_post

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: England has been famous for its puddings for centuries, and the word is now interchangeable with dessert, but it wasn’t always so. Historically puddings were essentially sausages with a filling stuffed into the stomach or intestines of an animal (the word probably comes from the Anglo-Norman word bodin meaning entrails). Sometimes they were kind of like dumplings, cooked in the broth with the meat for dinner.

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Pâté de Campagne – French Pâté / Fransk Postei

A classic French pâté recipe found in “Berømte Retter”
(Famoud Dishes) published by
Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970

Paté de campagne_post_ill

The principle of a French pâtés – a mixture of meat (or fish), herbs, lard, wine etc., cooked in a casserole dish or in a puff pastry – was launched in France as early as the Middle Ages. The best and finest pâtés comes from South West France – Perigord and Armagnac. The trick to making a pâté consists in finding good harmony and balance between taste and aroma. A good pâté will not taste significantly of just one ingredient, but should be an aromatic, indefinable whole.

These pâtés are always eaten cold, it makes the favours come together the best. A pâté should preferably be made the day before it is to be served. It can be stored for up to one week in the refrigerator and served as an appetizer, an evening meal or as sandwich spread.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 21

The Christmas Recipes – Part 21

Christmas Spiced Clemencello / Julekrydret Clemencello

Christmas Spiced Clemencello / Julekrydret Clemencello

Pepper Cookies / Pepperkaker

Pepper Cookies / Pepperkaker

Mash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

A great winter dinner recipe found on jamieoliver.comMash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

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Medieval Monday – Soul Cakes / Sjelekaker

A delicious cake recipe found on Lavender & Lovage
Medieval Monday_headingSoul Cakes_post

Karen who runs  “Lavender & Lovage” writes: These little cakes are a cross between a biscuit and a scone and were traditionally made for All Soul’s Day, which is on the 2nd of November. Packed with currants and mixed spice, these lovely little cakes are delicious with an afternoon cuppa.

This recipe is adapted from “A Calendar of Feasts – Cattern Cakes and Lace” by Julia Jones and Barbara Deer.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 18

The Christmas Recipes – Part 18

 

Pfeffernüsse – German Pepper Nuts – Tyske Peppernøtter

Pfeffernüsse – German Pepper Nuts /
Tyske Peppernøtter

Mulled White Wine & Spiced Tea / Hvit Gløgg & Krydret Te

Mulled White Wine & Spiced Tea /
Hvit Gløgg & Krydret Te

How to Make Aquavit / Slik Lager Du Akevitt Hjemme

A spicy liquor recipe found on britishfood.about.com
How to Make Aquavit / Slik Lager Du Akevitt Hjemme

Comments to the recipe: Aquavit is a Scandinavian liquor with just as long traditions as Russian and Polish vodka, so please don’t offend the whole of Scandinavia by saying that aquavit is a sort of flavoured vodka. Aquavit was first mentioned in writing in 1531 and there are 91 different aquavits produced in Scandinavia today. The only thing they have in common is that both aquavit and vodka was potato based as soon as potatoes were grown here and not made from grain (grain was to valuable this far north). And by the way, the dill plants is never used to flavour aquavit, it is dill seeds that are used and real aquavit lovers never, ever drink their aquavit chilled, it kills most of the flavours.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 16

The Christmas Recipes – Part 15

Café Brûlot – Burning Coffee / Brændende Kaffe

Café Brûlot – Burning Coffee / Brændende Kaffe

Coffee Punch / Kaffepunch

Coffee Punch / Kaffepunch