Norwegian Beef Stew / Oksegryte

A classic Norwegian stew recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Stews)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979
Norwegian Beef Stew / Oksegryte

Beef, onions and mushrooms simmered in white wine and sour cream. Classic Norwegian Sunday dinner.

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Classic English Winter Stew / Klassisk Engelsk Vintergryte

A classic English dish found on Your Home Magazine
Classic English Winter Stew / Klassisk Engelsk Vintergryte
  Slow cooked beef stew with winter vegetables – the perfect winter warmer after long country strolls with family and friends.

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Welsh Cawl / Walisisk Cawl

A recipe for the Welch national dish Cawl found at
was then called
about.com
Welsh Cawl / Walisisk Cawl

Cawl is the national dish of Wales. Welsh Cawl is a stew and made from bacon, Welsh lamb or beef, cabbage and leeks. Though more traditionally cheaper cuts of lamb are used, be warned Welsh recipes for Cawl vary from region to region and sometimes even season to season.There is no hard and fast rule.

Cawl can be eaten in one bowl, though often the broth will be served first followed by the meat and vegetables.

The flavors in Welsh Cawl do improve by keeping for a day or two, so don’t be afraid to make it in advance or save any leftovers for reheating.

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Autumn Stew / Høstgryte

En middagsoppskrift funnet i “den Store Minikokeboken”
(The Big Mini Cookbook) A collection of recipe booklets
published by the Norwegian Information Office for Meat
Autumn Stew / Høstgryte

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Winter Stew / Vintergryte

A filling stew found in “Lammekjøtt” (Lamb)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

Winter Stew / Vintergryte

Root vegetables, cabbage, onion and lamb and hot spices. With rice as an accessory, this becomes a vitamin bomb when you need it most.

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Norwegian Lamb Stew with Potatoes / Lammegryte med Poteter

A traditional Norwegian stew found in “Lammekjøtt”
(Lamb) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981

Norwegian Lamb Stew with Potatoes / Lammegryte med Poteter

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Karjalan Paisti – Karelian Hot Pot / Karelsk Gryterett

A classic Finish dinner recipe found on
what was then called
 
about.co.uk
Karjalan Paisti - Karelian Hot Pot / Karelsk Gryterett

Karelian Hot Pot or Karjalan Paisti in Finnish is a traditional meat stew from the region of Karelia (now split between Finland and Russia). It’s commonly made with a combination of pork and beef but other proteins, like lamb, can be used. Finnish hot pot is typically seasoned with black peppercorns, allspice and bay leaves.

This Finnish stew is made in one large pot over low heat, once everything is chopped, it’s a real hands-off recipe. Serve Karelian Hot Pot as the Finns do, with mashed potatoes and cranberry or lingonberry preserves on the side.

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West African Meat and Spinach Stew / Vestafrikanske Kjøtt- og Spinatstuing

An African recipe found in “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

West African Meat and Spinach Stew / Vestafrikanske Kjøtt- og Spinatstuing

West African cuisine encompasses a diverse range of foods that are split between its 16 countries. In West Africa, many families grow and raise their own food, and within each there is a division of labor. Indigenous foods consist of a number of plant species and animals, and are important to those whose lifestyle depends on farming and hunting.

The history of West Africa also plays a large role in their cuisine and recipes, as interactions with different cultures (particularly the Arab world and later Europeans) over the centuries have introduced many ingredients that would go on to become key components of the various national cuisines today.

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Veal Stew with Oranges / Kalvegryde med Appelsin

A dinner recipe from “Mine 100 Bedste Opskrifter Fra Fad
Og Fryser” (My 100 Best Recipes from Pots and Freezer) by Mona Giersing published by Lademann in 1982

Veal Stew with Oranges / Kalvegryde med Appelsin

It’s not very often you see Scandinavian dinner recipes using fruit to the to the extent that Mona Giersing is using here. It almost gives this veal stew a touch of the Caribbean and that certainly works for me – Ted

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Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

A dinner recipe with origins in Hungary found in “Mat for Travle” (Food for Busy People) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982
Onion Goulash / Løkgulasj

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás [ˈɡujaːʃ]) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Eastern Europe, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century to stews eaten by Hungarian shepherds. Back then, the cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

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Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

A traditional Norwegian dish found on matprat.no
Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

Traditional food with an asumed origin from Western Norway. These days, this dish is eaten all over the country, and every “stewed fish family” have their own recipe. Some people use plain cod or stock fish instead of lightly salted cod. Some families may swear to pollock, but there is one thing they all have in common. A really tasty meal.

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Flensburg Stew / Flensburg Gryde

A stew recipe found in “Mine 100 Bedste Opskrifter
Fra Fad Og Fryse” (My 100 Best Recipes from Serving Plates and Freezers) by Mona Giersing published by Lademann in 1982

Flensburg Stew / Flensburg Gryde

Flensburg (Danish: Flensborg, Low Saxon: Flensborg, North Frisian: Flansborj, South Jutlandic: Flensborre) is an independent town (kreisfreie Stadt) in the north of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. Flensburg is the centre of the region of Southern Schleswig. After Kiel and Lübeck it is the third largest town in Schleswig-Holstein.

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Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

A delicious snack recipe found in “Lær Mer om Sopp” (Learn More
About Mushrooms ) published by BAMA gruppen in 1982

Mushroom Stew on Butterfried Toast / Soppstuing på Smørstekt Toast

Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of macrofungi (fungi which bear fruiting structures that are large enough to be seen with the naked eye). They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand. Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.

Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. Mushrooms consumed by those practicing folk medicine are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.

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Mushrooms in Tart Shells / Sopp i Terteskjell

A lunch recipe found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1885sopp i terteskjell_post_thumb[2]_thumb

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Skipper’s Stew / Skipperlapskovs

A traditional Danish recipe found on familiejournal.dk
Skipper’s Stew / Skipperlapskovs

This kind of a dish is called a “Lapskovs” in Danish and “Lapskaus” in Norwegian and both words are thought to come from the English word “lobscouse”.

Lobscouse: a sailor’s dish of stewed or baked meat with vegetables and hardtack – Merriam-Webster

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