Homemade Black Licorice / Hjemmelaget Svart Lakris

A classic sweets recipe  found on food52.com
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I got a feeling that licorice is something you either love or hate. As a kid I loved the soft sweet ones, now I’m more partial to the harder salty ones, but wouldn’t say no to some sweet ones even now. You’ve guessed it, I know, I love licorice – Ted  😉

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The Real Story About Irish Coffee And How It Was Invented

Before lattes and cappuccinos, before frappuccinos and espressos there was flavored coffee, ie Irish coffee, still one of the world’s most popular drinks. Yet not that much is known about why and how it became so popular.

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Margaret O’Shaughnessy, the Founding Director at Foynes Flying Boat museum in County Limerick, has written to IrishCentral to say the flying boat terminal at Foynes, 35 miles from Shannon, and not Shannon Airport was the location for the first Irish Coffee after we mistakenly said Shannon was where it was invented in a recent article.

The inventor, bartender Joe Sheridan, later moved to San Francisco and worked at the Buena Vista Cafe irish coffee_04where journalist Stanton Delaplane of the San Francisco Chronicle had brought back the secret formula from Ireland and started one of the world’s most famous drinks.

Despite it being an incredible success, Delaplane later admitted he couldn’t stand the stuff yet found his name forever linked to it.

Sheridan was a top class chef and bartender whose family had moved from the North to Dublin. When he applied for the chef’s job at Rineanna, the townland in Limerick where the Flying Boat terminal was based, his application came in to CEO Brendan O’Regan for the position of chef and it simply stated, “Dear Sir. I’m the man for the job. Yours sincerely, Joe Sheridan.

It turned out he wasn’t lying. Foynes was the first Irish transatlantic Airport when Pan Am did their first passenger commercial flights from New York to Foynes in 1939 and Joe Sheridan soon became famous.

irish coffee_03The Pan Am flying boats were based at Foynes while Shannon Airport was actually 35 miles away. Charles Lindbergh helped choose the two airports for Pan Am but no direct flights from Shannon to the US occurred until 1945, long after Irish coffee was invented

Until then passengers to the US from Europe flew into Shannon and were bussed to Foynes.

In 1943 a flying boat flight to New York turned back due to bad weather and Joe Sheridan, originally from Castlederg in Co. Tyrone – a chef and highly skilled bartender – was asked to come back to Foynes to prepare hot food and drinks for the freezing passengers.

He put some good Irish whiskey into their coffees and was asked by the passengers if he had used Brazilian coffee to which he replied ”No it was Irish coffee.” He then continued to put the coffee in a glass and topped it with pouring cream – thus the Irish coffee we know today was invented in Foynes, not Shannon Airport that night.

Furthermore, in 1952 Joe Sheridan was offered a job in san Francisco at the Buena Vista and he met Stanton Delaplane the journalist who had made his drink world famous.

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The San Francisco Chronicle reported that after sampling Irish Coffee at Foynes in 1951 Delaplane flew home and he spent a long evening at the Buena Vista Cafe near the foot of Hyde Street working out the proper balance of ingredients. Overnight Jack Koeppler, the late owner of what had been a quiet neighborhood bar, found himself the proprietor of the most prosperous saloon in the city.

irish coffee_06Five years later, Delaplane was quoted in Time magazine as saying; “I can’t stand the stuff anymore.”

Joe Sheridan was even enticed over to the Buena Vista in 1952 and worked there for ten years. He is buried in Oakland, CA. Delaplane, who was the winner of a Pulitzer Prize, died in 1988.

Today the Buena Vista serves up to 2,000 Irish coffees a day. The busiest day they’ve ever had was the Super Bowl in 1982, 49ers vs. Miami. Three bartenders served 109 bottles of whiskey between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The night crew served another 104. There are 29 drinks per bottle. So that means the pub served well over 6,000 drinks that day [6,177 specifically].

All because of a cold night and bad weather, all because of a storm in 1943 that forced a flight to America back to its origin at Foynes Irish coffee became the first flavored coffee drink. One wonders what Joe and Stan would make of all the flavored beans in Starbuck’s these days!

traditional strong irish coffee on wooden bar with coffee beans

Article by James O’Shea found at irishcentral.com

Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

A traditional recipe from Northern Norway found on Aperitif.no
Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

History: This recipe is originally from the Northern part of Norway and is found in many a grandmother’s handwritten cookbook. The recipe can be traced to the early nineteenth century, but it is not unlikely that it is even older.

The traditional accompaniments were flat bread and sour cream, and the fillet was placed in the basement for maturing as there were not many fridges to find in those days. Lofoten was famously for its close relations with the continent in connection with exports of stockfish and dried fish, and therefore had access to some nobler ingredients, such as port wine.

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Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

A medieval fruit paste recipe found on Turnspit & Table
Medieval Monday - 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16ende Århundre

Kim who runs ‘Turnspit & Table‘ writes: Quince Paste is the ancestor of modern marmalade, people have been preserving quinces for a very long time. The Greeks and Romans packed them tightly into honey to make melomeli or cooked it down to a paste with honey and pepper, often recommending them as treatments for complaints of the stomach.

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Mascarpone Gratinated Blackberries with Orange / Mascarponegratinerte Bjørnebær med Appelsin

A delicious dessert recipe found on kiwi.no
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It is important that the berries are still frozen when placed in the oven. The secret of this dessert is the combination of warm, bubbling cheese with berries that are still slightly frozen. Absolutely delicious!

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Chocolate Pots de Creme / Sjokolade Pots de Creme

A classic French dessert recipe found on epicurus.com
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Simply extraordinary, Chocolate Pots de Crême may be served in a variety of containers. As individual portions, they’re perfect for entertaining and easy for family sweets. These go perfectly with a nice after dinner liqueur.

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Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

A delicious dessert recipe found on allrecipes.com
Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

If you love rhubarb-strawberry mixtures, you’ll love
this sweet rhubarb crisp.

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French Waffles / Franske Vafler

A classic French recipe from “Dessertkaker” (Dessert Cakes) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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They may be called waffles although they don’t look like any waffles I’ve ever seen. But trust the French to come up with a delicious dessert cake anyway. Waffles or not they certainly look good enough to eat – Ted  😉

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Rose Turkish Delight / Rosa Turkish Delight

A great Christmasy sweets recipe found on goodtoknow.co.ukRose Turkish Delight_goodtoknow_post

Delicately flavoured with rosewater, these homemade Turkish Delights look gorgeous and taste wonderful. A great gift. This easy rose Turkish Delight recipe makes 36-49 squares and is the perfect food gift to wrap up in cellophane bags and give to loved ones. It’s a classic recipe that you’ll want to make time and time again.

Don’t forget to dust each cube with icing sugar before handing to friends and family. Once you’ve made your Turkish Delight store in a cool, dry place (but not in the fridge) for up to 1 week. This recipe is not suitable for freezing. Turkish Delight like most recipes to best made and eaten on the same day.

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Caponata Palermitana – Sicilian Sweet & Sour Vegetables / Sicilianske Sur-Søte Grønnsaker

A vegetarian lunch recipe from “The Sainsbury
Book of Italian Cooking” published in 1979

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A delicious vegetable lunch dish full of Mediterranean goodies. Serve it with fresh ciabattas og en Ruffino Classico and close your eyes and imagine yourself seated at a sidewalk table in Palermo. Sounds nice doesn’t it, particularly here in Oslo, where the winter’s first snow fell yesterday – Ted  😉

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Austrian Stuffed Pancakes / Østerrikske Fylte Pannekaker

A great dessert recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984
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I must have posted several recipes for filled pancakes already, but the truth is I love them. Particularly with sweet filling like these ones. Austrians seams to have a particular sweet tooth as most of their sweets and dessert recipes tends to go rather heavy on the sugar. What do I care, I got a sweet tooth myself the size of medium battleship – Ted 😉

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Martha Washington’s “Excellent Cherry Bounce” / Martha Washingtons "Utmerkede Kirsebær Bounce"

A historic cherry liqueur recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
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The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Bounce is made from sour cherries, sugar, and liquor such as brandy, rum, or whiskey. Martha’s recipe, which was found in her papers although not in her handwriting, called for brandy. This drink was one of George’s favorites. He even took it along on journeys — on a trip west in 1784, in search of a commercial waterway from the Atlantic to the Mississippi Valley, he packed canteens of Madeira, port, and bounce.

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Swedish Port Wine Punch / Svensk Portvinspunch

A classic punch recipe found in “MENU – Internationalt Madleksikon” (MENU – International Food Encyclopedia) published by Lademann in 1976
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I don’t know about you, but around my neck of the woods it’s getting rather cold. Autumn is creeping steadily towards winter and hot beverages, with or without alcohol are certainy the order of the day. This Swedish punch is usually served during Christmas, but don’t let that stop you from making a batch right now. You can always make more for Christmas – Ted  😉

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Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
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The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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Smith College Fudge / Fudge fra Smith College

A recipe from “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes by Miss Paloa”
published  Baker’s & Co in 1909

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An American-style fudge (containing chocolate) was found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1889 and sold it for 40 cents a pound. Hartridge obtained the fudge recipe and, in 1890, made 30 lb (14 kg) of fudge for the Vassar College Senior Auction.This Vassar fudge recipe became quite popular at the school for years to come.

Word of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges. For example, Wellesley College and Smith College have their own versions of a fudge recipe dating from the late 19th or early 20th century.

Fudge-making evolved a variety of flavors and additives as it grew beyond its popularity at colleges.

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