Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

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Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

A great dessert recipe found in “Hershey’s Make it Chocolate!” published by Hershey in 1987Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

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Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with Saronno, Italy. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee and ice cream.

Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten Meieriprodukter

A cake recipe from “So Delightful -50 Dairy-Free Recipes That Are Truly So Delicious” published by So Delicious Dairy Free
Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten MeieriprodukterApart from being dairy-free this cake is also soy-free.

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Chocolate Sponge anno 1927 / Sjokoladepudding anno 1927

A classic chocolate dessert found in “Knox Gelatine – Dainty Desserts  – Candies – Salads” published in 1927
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I mentioned in the previous post that I loved thin pancakes, but to be honest, I’m sort of a all round dessert kind of guy. So you might already have guessed, I love chocolate desserts too

Ted
Winking smile

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Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

An 18th centure dessert recipe found on evolutionarypie.com
Loudoun’s Apple Pudding / Loudouns Eplepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs https://revolutionarypie.com writes: John Campbell Loudoun’s apple pudding recipe first caught my eye because it was written in verse. A rarity today, rhyming recipes were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when they were supposedly used by housewives to help them remember recipes. Loudoun’s poem, attributed to him by Kristie Lynn and Robert Pelton, authors of The Early American Cookbook, is much older, dating back to the 18th century.

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Citrus Flavor Creme Catalane / Creme Catalane med Smak av Sitrus

A contemporary take on a traditional Spanish
dessert recipe found on meny.no

Citrus Flavor Creme Catalane / Creme Catalane med Smak av Sitrus

Crema catalana is a traditional Spanish dessert made from milk, egg yolks and sugar. It is considered by some to be the forerunner of crème brûlée. The crema catalana on the pictures is sevred with a citrus salad.

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Fermented Raspberry Soda / Musserende Bringebærbrus

A homemade tart soda recipe found on saveur.com
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Cookbook author Amy Thielen likes to add a splash of this tart, naturally fizzy juice to grown-up, not-too-sweet ice cream floats for a bright swath of flavor. You may also like mixing it into cocktails and even vinaigrettes. You can start with any fruit, but the smaller and juicier the better.

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Homemade Black Licorice / Hjemmelaget Svart Lakris

A classic sweets recipe  found on food52.com
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I got a feeling that licorice is something you either love or hate. As a kid I loved the soft sweet ones, now I’m more partial to the harder salty ones, but wouldn’t say no to some sweet ones even now. You’ve guessed it, I know, I love licorice – Ted  😉

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The Real Story About Irish Coffee And How It Was Invented

Before lattes and cappuccinos, before frappuccinos and espressos there was flavored coffee, ie Irish coffee, still one of the world’s most popular drinks. Yet not that much is known about why and how it became so popular.

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Margaret O’Shaughnessy, the Founding Director at Foynes Flying Boat museum in County Limerick, has written to IrishCentral to say the flying boat terminal at Foynes, 35 miles from Shannon, and not Shannon Airport was the location for the first Irish Coffee after we mistakenly said Shannon was where it was invented in a recent article.

The inventor, bartender Joe Sheridan, later moved to San Francisco and worked at the Buena Vista Cafe irish coffee_04where journalist Stanton Delaplane of the San Francisco Chronicle had brought back the secret formula from Ireland and started one of the world’s most famous drinks.

Despite it being an incredible success, Delaplane later admitted he couldn’t stand the stuff yet found his name forever linked to it.

Sheridan was a top class chef and bartender whose family had moved from the North to Dublin. When he applied for the chef’s job at Rineanna, the townland in Limerick where the Flying Boat terminal was based, his application came in to CEO Brendan O’Regan for the position of chef and it simply stated, “Dear Sir. I’m the man for the job. Yours sincerely, Joe Sheridan.

It turned out he wasn’t lying. Foynes was the first Irish transatlantic Airport when Pan Am did their first passenger commercial flights from New York to Foynes in 1939 and Joe Sheridan soon became famous.

irish coffee_03The Pan Am flying boats were based at Foynes while Shannon Airport was actually 35 miles away. Charles Lindbergh helped choose the two airports for Pan Am but no direct flights from Shannon to the US occurred until 1945, long after Irish coffee was invented

Until then passengers to the US from Europe flew into Shannon and were bussed to Foynes.

In 1943 a flying boat flight to New York turned back due to bad weather and Joe Sheridan, originally from Castlederg in Co. Tyrone – a chef and highly skilled bartender – was asked to come back to Foynes to prepare hot food and drinks for the freezing passengers.

He put some good Irish whiskey into their coffees and was asked by the passengers if he had used Brazilian coffee to which he replied ”No it was Irish coffee.” He then continued to put the coffee in a glass and topped it with pouring cream – thus the Irish coffee we know today was invented in Foynes, not Shannon Airport that night.

Furthermore, in 1952 Joe Sheridan was offered a job in san Francisco at the Buena Vista and he met Stanton Delaplane the journalist who had made his drink world famous.

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The San Francisco Chronicle reported that after sampling Irish Coffee at Foynes in 1951 Delaplane flew home and he spent a long evening at the Buena Vista Cafe near the foot of Hyde Street working out the proper balance of ingredients. Overnight Jack Koeppler, the late owner of what had been a quiet neighborhood bar, found himself the proprietor of the most prosperous saloon in the city.

irish coffee_06Five years later, Delaplane was quoted in Time magazine as saying; “I can’t stand the stuff anymore.”

Joe Sheridan was even enticed over to the Buena Vista in 1952 and worked there for ten years. He is buried in Oakland, CA. Delaplane, who was the winner of a Pulitzer Prize, died in 1988.

Today the Buena Vista serves up to 2,000 Irish coffees a day. The busiest day they’ve ever had was the Super Bowl in 1982, 49ers vs. Miami. Three bartenders served 109 bottles of whiskey between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The night crew served another 104. There are 29 drinks per bottle. So that means the pub served well over 6,000 drinks that day [6,177 specifically].

All because of a cold night and bad weather, all because of a storm in 1943 that forced a flight to America back to its origin at Foynes Irish coffee became the first flavored coffee drink. One wonders what Joe and Stan would make of all the flavored beans in Starbuck’s these days!

traditional strong irish coffee on wooden bar with coffee beans

Article by James O’Shea found at irishcentral.com

Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

A traditional recipe from Northern Norway found on Aperitif.no
Port Wine Cured Lamb Fillet / Portvinsgravet Lammefilet

History: This recipe is originally from the Northern part of Norway and is found in many a grandmother’s handwritten cookbook. The recipe can be traced to the early nineteenth century, but it is not unlikely that it is even older.

The traditional accompaniments were flat bread and sour cream, and the fillet was placed in the basement for maturing as there were not many fridges to find in those days. Lofoten was famously for its close relations with the continent in connection with exports of stockfish and dried fish, and therefore had access to some nobler ingredients, such as port wine.

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Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

A medieval fruit paste recipe found on Turnspit & Table
Medieval Monday - 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16ende Århundre

Kim who runs ‘Turnspit & Table‘ writes: Quince Paste is the ancestor of modern marmalade, people have been preserving quinces for a very long time. The Greeks and Romans packed them tightly into honey to make melomeli or cooked it down to a paste with honey and pepper, often recommending them as treatments for complaints of the stomach.

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Mascarpone Gratinated Blackberries with Orange / Mascarponegratinerte Bjørnebær med Appelsin

A delicious dessert recipe found on kiwi.no
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It is important that the berries are still frozen when placed in the oven. The secret of this dessert is the combination of warm, bubbling cheese with berries that are still slightly frozen. Absolutely delicious!

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Chocolate Pots de Creme / Sjokolade Pots de Creme

A classic French dessert recipe found on epicurus.com
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Simply extraordinary, Chocolate Pots de Crême may be served in a variety of containers. As individual portions, they’re perfect for entertaining and easy for family sweets. These go perfectly with a nice after dinner liqueur.

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Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

A delicious dessert recipe found on allrecipes.com
Royal Rhubarb Crisp / Kongelig Rabarbra Dessert

If you love rhubarb-strawberry mixtures, you’ll love
this sweet rhubarb crisp.

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French Waffles / Franske Vafler

A classic French recipe from “Dessertkaker” (Dessert Cakes) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
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They may be called waffles although they don’t look like any waffles I’ve ever seen. But trust the French to come up with a delicious dessert cake anyway. Waffles or not they certainly look good enough to eat – Ted  😉

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