Prosecco Jelly Squares / Prosecco Geléruter

A recipe for some grown-up sweets found on chatelaine.com
Prosecco Jelly Squares / Prosecco Geléruter

Add some grown-up sparkle with these delicious jelly squares
for your Easter sweets.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Knox Dainties / Knox Gelegotteri

Lovely jelly sweets recipes found in “Knox Gelatine Dainty Desserts – Salads – Candies” published in  1927”Knox Dainties / Knox Gelegotteri

I have to admit that I love homemade sweets. We always made marzipan, cream and chocolate caramels and candied fruit for Christmas when I was a kid and the thought of those can still make me drift off into lovely childhood memories. I think it’s time to start planning the easter sweets – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Tiger Nut Balls / Tiger Nøttekuler

A 3.500 year old sweet recipe found on historyextra.com
Tiger Nut Balls / Tiger Nøttekuler

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates a healthy snack thought to have been enjoyed in Egypt around 3,500 years ago.

Sam Not writes: If you, like me, have a sweet tooth but are trying to be healthier then try tiger nut balls.

I found lots of references to this being one of the first Egyptian recipes that we know of, found written on an ancient ostraca (inscribed broken pottery) dating back to 1600 BC. Although I haven’t found a definitive source for this (or why tiger nut balls don’t contain tiger nuts!) they sounded too delicious to pass over. As your average ancient Egyptian seems to have had a very sweet tooth and often added dates and honey to desserts, I like to think that this is a sweet that would have been made thousands of years ago.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Earl Grey Chocolates / Earl Grey Sjokolader

A delicious chocolate recipe found on epicurus.comEarl Grey Chocolates_post

Tasty, sultry and sinfully good, Earl Grey Chocolates provide a delicious snack – a morsel of love. The tea ganache is smooth
and luscious.

This one is for you Ingrid ❤

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Candied Ginger / Kandisert Ingefær

A great sweet recipe found on chatelaine.com
Candied ginger_post

Sweet snacks with incredible flavour. Everyone will want to dig in when you open up a jar of these homemade treats.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Rowntree’s Fruit Gums & Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_04

Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_05Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles are small round sweets measuring about 1.5 cm (0.6 in) in diameter; they have a jelly-like consistency, due to the gelatin they are made from, and are covered with sugar. They contain fruit juice, have no artificial colours or flavours, and come in five flavours: lemon (yellow), lime (green), strawberry (red), blackcurrant (purple) and orange (orange).

History

At Rowntree’s factory in Fawdon, Tyneside in 1881, Rowntree introduced Fruit Pastilles, and the product proved to be a great success, accounting for about 25 percent of the company’s tonnage by 1887.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_06Packaging

Tubes of Fruit Pastilles are wrapped in foil-backed paper (paper on the inside, foil on the outside) with a paper wrapper over the top. The paper wrapper is green in colour with “Fruit Pastilles” written along the front in large lettering. Along the bottom of the lettering there are pictures of different types of fruit all relating to the flavours within the packet, The top bears the “Rowntree’s” brand name. Fruit Pastilles come in a small pack weighing 52.5 grams (1.85 oz), containing 14 pastilles, but are also available in larger bags weighing 180 grams (6.3 oz). They are also available in boxes and larger round cardboard tubes.

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_02Marketing and Advertising

The 1972 television advertising campaign used the song Pistol Packin’ Mama with the tag line “Pastille Pickin’ Mama, pass those pastilles round”.

To drive awareness of the 25% fruit juice recipe in Fruit Pastilles, Rowntree conducted a 105-day experimental marketing campaign. At family events, top-end grocers and service stations they invited families to join in their ‘What Can Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_03You Do But Chew?’ talent shows, tying in with the brand’s sponsorship of Britain’s Got Talent. 427,240 product samples were distributed as brand ambassadors tried to engage parents with the ‘25% fruit juice’ message. 93% of the consumers involved said they’d had a positive shift in brand perception, whilst more than half were ‘highly likely’ to purchase post campaign.[3]

A more recent TV commercial shows a man about to chew on a Fruit Pastille when he is surrounded by medieval people who declare whether he’d chew the pastille or go out on a date with a fair maiden. In the end he has to chew. The commercial concludes with the message “Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles with real fruit flavour. You can’t help but chew!”

Rowntree's Fruit Pastilles_01

A commercial from the 1980s has recently been revived, featuring a child daring a basketball player to not chew on a pastille. The slogan from the previous ad is still used.

Rowntree’s Fruit Gums

Roundtrees_01Rowntree’s Fruit Gums are circular sweets formerly made by Rowntree’s, who were later acquired by Nestlé. There were five flavours, each of a different colour: strawberry, orange, lemon, blackcurrant and lime. The sweets were introduced in 1893, and originally marketed as Rowntree’s Clear Gums – “The nation’s favourite sweet” – and were available in twopenny tubes and sixpenny packets.[1] In addition to the traditional roll packaging, they were available in a larger-volume box containing the sweets in the shape of the fruit or part of the fruit that the flavour represents.

Roundtrees_02Ingredients

Fruit Gums are primarily composed of glucose syrup and fruit juices and are therefore similar to wine gums (another British confectionery item). Originally the purple fruit gums were referred to as “blusterberry”, but this changed to blackcurrant in the 1990s after a failed advertising campaign.

“Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”

An advertising campaign for the gums that ran for three years from 1958 to 1961 included the slogan “Don’t Forget the Fruit Gums, Mum”. The slogan was invented by the copywriter Roger Musgrave (1929-2007).

Roundtrees_04

The television advert featured a young boy reminding his mother to buy fruit gums as she leaves to go shopping. The advert claims that “[Fruit Gums] last all day” and that “Rowntree’s Fruit Gums last the longest”. This referred to the number of sweets in the tube.

Butter Caramels / Smørkarameller

A classic caramel recipe found on tara.no
Butter Caramels / Smørkarameller

A Sweet classic that can be flavored with chopped nuts, cardamom, gingerbread spices or grated lemon peel. These should be added when the cooking is done and just before you pour the caramel mixture into the mould.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The Christmas Recipes – Part 30

The Christmas Recipes – Part 30

Peppermint Candies / Peppermyntekonfekt

Peppermint Candies / Peppermyntekonfekt

Quick Troll Cream / Rask Trollkrem

Quick Troll Cream / Rask Trollkrem

Hot Spicy Apple Drink / Varm Krydret Epledrikk

Hot Spicy Apple Drink / Varm Krydret Epledrikk

The Christmas Recipes – Part 24

The Christmas Recipes – Part 24

Delfia Cake / Delfiakake

Delfia Cake / Delfiakake

Enchanted Pebbles / Forheksede Småstein

Enchanted Pebbles / Forheksede Småstein

Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy / Enkle Martha Washington Sjokolade kuler

A historic candy recipe found at recipelion.com
Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy_post

A holiday tradition for many families, Martha Washington’s candy is a treat that’s easy to make and even more delicious to eat. This particular recipe for No-Bake Martha Washington Candy features just a few choice ingredients, making it even simpler to prepare.

Martha WashingtonMartha Washington (née Dandridge; June 13 [O.S. June 2] 1731– May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States. Although the title was not coined until after her death, Martha Washington is considered to be the first First Lady of the United States. During her lifetime she was often referred to as “Lady Washington”

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The Christmas Recipes – Part 23

The Christmas Recipes – Part 23

Reindeer Steak With Baked Red Cabbage & Parsnip Purée / Reinsdyrstek Med Ovnsbakt Rødkål & Pastinakkpuré

Reindeer Steak With Baked Red Cabbage & Parsnip Purée / Reinsdyrstek Med Ovnsbakt Rødkål & Pastinakkpuré

Anise Toffees / Aniskarameller

Anise Toffees / Aniskarameller

The Christmas Recipes – Part 22

The Christmas Recipes – Part 22

Cloudberry Cream / Moltekrem

Cloudberry Cream / Moltekrem

French Nougat With Pistachio / Fransk Nougat Med Pistasj

French Nougat With Pistachio /
Fransk Nougat Med Pistasj

The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

The Christmas Recipes – Part 20

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Chocolate Truffles On 3 Ingredients / Sjokoladetrøfler På 3 Ingredienser

Orange Soup With Pannacotta / Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Orange Soup With Pannacotta /
Appelsinsuppe Med Pannacotta

Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

A candy recipe found in “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1909
Almond and Cherry Chocolate Creams / Mandel og Kirsebær Sjokolade Konfekt

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge sweets000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of KitKat

kitKat_08Use of the name Kit Kat or Kit Cat for a type of food goes back to the 18th century, when mutton pies known as a Kit-Kat were served at meetings of the political Kit-Cat Club in London.

The origins of what is now known as the Kit Kat brand go back to 1911, when Rowntree’s, a confectionery company based in York in the United Kingdom, trademarked the terms Kit Cat and Kit Kat. Although the terms were not immediately used, the first conception of the Kit Kat appeared in the 1920s, when Rowntree launched a brand of boxed chocolates entitled Kit Cat. This continued into the 1930s, when Rowntree’s shifted focus and production onto its Black Magic and Dairy Box brands. With the promotion of alternative kitKat_02products the Kit Cat brand decreased and was eventually discontinued. The original four-finger bar was developed after a worker at Rowntree’s York Factory put a suggestion in a recommendation box for a snack that “a man could take to work in his pack”. The bar launched on 29 August 1935, under the title of Rowntree’s Chocolate Crisp (priced at 2d), and was sold in London and throughout Southern England.

kitKat_05The product’s official title of Rowntree’s Chocolate Crisp was renamed Kit Kat Chocolate Crisp in 1937, the same year that Kit Kat began to incorporate “Break” into its recognisable advertising strategy. The colour scheme and first flavour variation to the brand came in 1942, owing to World War II, when food shortages prompted an alteration in the recipe. The flavour of Kit Kat was changed to dark chocolate; the packaging abandoned its Chocolate Crisp title, and was adorned in blue.[5] After the war the title was altered to Kit Kat and resumed its original milk recipe and red packaging.

kitKat_03Following on from its success in the United Kingdom, in the 1940s Kit Kat was exported to Canada, South Africa, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand. In 1958, Donald Gilles, the executive at JWT Orland, created the iconic advertising line “Have a Break, Have a Kit Kat”. The brand further expanded in the 1970s when Rowntree created a new distribution factory in Germany to meet European demand, and established agreements to distribute the brand in the USA and Japan through the Hershey and Fujiya companies, respectively. In June 1988 Nestlé acquired Kit Kat through the purchase of Rowntree’s. This gave Nestlé global control over the brand, except in the US, and production and distribution increased with new facilities in Japan and additional manufacturing operations set up in Malaysia, India and China.[2]

The Hershey Company has a licence to produce Kit Kat bars in the United States which dates from 1970, when Hershey executed a licensing agreement with Rowntree. Nestlé, which has a substantial kitKat_04presence in the US, had to honour the licensing agreement when it bought Rowntree in 1988 which allowed Hershey to retain the Kit Kat licence so long as Hershey was not sold. As Kit Kat is one of Hershey’s top five brands in the US market, the Kit Kat licence was a key factor in Hershey’s failed attempt to attract a serious buyer in 2002.

Variants in the traditional chocolate bar first appeared in 1996 when Kit Kat Orange, the first flavour variant, was introduced in the United Kingdom. Its success was followed by several varieties including mint and caramel, and in 1999 Kit Kat Chunky was launched and received favourably by international consumers. Variations on the traditional Kit Kat have continued to develop throughout the 2000s. In 2000, Nestlé acquired Fujiya’s share of the brand in Japan, and also expanded its marketplace in Japan, Russia, Turkey, and Venezuela, in addition to kitKat_01markets in Eastern and Central Europe. Throughout the decade Kit Kat has introduced dozens of flavours and line extensions within specific consumer markets, and celebrated its 75th anniversary on 10 October 2009.

The traditional bar has four fingers which each measure approximately 1 centimetre (0.4 in) by 9 centimetres (3.5 in). A two-finger bar was launched in the 1930s, and has remained the company’s best-selling biscuit brand ever since. The 1999 Kit Kat Chunky (known as Big Kat and Kit Kat Extra Crispy in the US) has one large finger approximately 2.5 centimetres (1 in) wide. Kit Kat bars contain varying numbers of fingers depending on the market, ranging from the half-finger sized Kit Kat Petit in Japan, to the three-fingered variants in Arabia, to the twelve-finger family-size bars in Australia and France. Kit Kat bars are sold individually and in bags, boxes and multi-packs. In Ireland, France, the UK and America Nestlé also produces a Kit Kat ice cream, and in Australia and Malaysia, Kit Kat Drumsticks.

In 2010, a new £5 million manufacturing line was opened by Nestlé in York. This will produce more than a billion Kit Kat bars each year.

kitKat_06

Text from Wikipedia