Norwegian Oatmeal Dreams / Havredrømmer

A recipe for delicious small confectionery balls found on godt.no
Norwegian Oatmeal Dreams / Havredrømmer

A nice little treat for the Christmas candy dish. Try these delicious “confectioneries” with oatmeal and marzipan.

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Hazelnut Truffles / Hasselnøttstrøfler

A classic sweet recipe found on jacobs.no
Hazelnut Truffles / Hasselnøttstrøfler

Hasselnut truffles taste delicious and is well suited for both
your Christmas coffee and for Christmas gifts.

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Peanut Toffees / Peanøttkarameller

A recipe for toffees thattastes both salt and sweet
found on
 nrk.no

Peanut Toffees / Peanøttkarameller

Peanut toffees taste both salty and sweet in an unbeatable combination. If you got Golden Syrup, peanut butter and salty crackers, you have the most important ingredients in this recipe.

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Swedish Mint Kisses / Mintkyssar

A recipe for classic Swedish Christmas Candy found on  svt.seSwedish Mint Kisses / Mintkyssar

Mint kisses, classic Swedish sweets that belongs to Christmas. Not at all difficult to make and appreciated by both young and old. Silky sugar candy flavored with mint and decorated with dark chocolate, oh, so delicious!

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Marcipan Bread with Baileys and Pistachio / Marcipanbrød med Baileys og Pistacie

A new take on an old Danish Classic found on soendag.dk
Marcipan Bread with Baileys and Pistachio / Marcipanbrød med Baileys og Pistacie

The classic Danish marcipan bread with Baileys and pistachio
– it’s well worth a try!

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Nougat Almonds / Nougatmandler

A simple recipe for nougat covered almonds
found on
nrk.no
Nougat Almonds / Nougatmandler

Crispy almonds with nougat and icing sugar are simple confectionery which you easily make yourself. This recipe for nougat almonds has only three ingredients.

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Mock Marzipan Without Almonds and Nuts / Falsk Marsipan uten Mandler og Nøtter

A marzipan recipe for people who are allergic to
almonds and nuts found on jacobs.no
Mock Marzipan Without Almonds and Nuts / Falsk Marsipan uten Mandler og Nøtter

Are you or someone in your family allergic to almonds and nuts? Here is a recipe for the mock marzipan made without almonds and nuts that you can use to make tasty ‘marzipan’ sweets.

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Snowballs / Snøballer

A classic Norwegian Christmas sweet recipe found on aperitif.no
Snowballs / Snøballer

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Chocolate Confectionery / Sjokoladekonfekt

A sweet recipe found in “Ferdig på Forhånd” (Done in Advance)published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1984
Chocolate Confectionery / Sjokoladekonfekt

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Homemade Raspberry Wine Gum / Hjemmelaget Gelégodteri av Bringebær

A recipe fore homemade sweets found on nrk.no
Homemade Raspberry Wine Gum / Hjemmelaget Gelégodteri av Bringebær

Homemade wine gum can be hard to resist when it is
made with real berries.

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Salt Vanilla Toffees / Salte Vaniljekarameller

A sweets recipe found on nrk.no
Salt Vanilla Toffees / Salte Vaniljekarameller

Homemade Christmas sweets have long traditions in Scandinavia. Make the salty version in this recipe or give the toffees a taste of licorice with licorice powder. Or try it with cardamom for Christmas flavors, or use finely grated citrus peel.

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Easy Nougat Marcipan Christmas Trees / Nemme Nougat-Marcipan Juletræer

Delicious Danish Christmas sweets found on madogbolig.dk
Easy Nougat Marcipan Christmas Trees / Nemme Nougat-Marcipan Juletræer

Fill the sweets platter with these lovely Christmas trees made of nougat and marcipan coated with chocolate. Nougat and marcipan is a must in Denmark when the Christmas sweets are served. Here the sweets are shaped like small Christmas trees, so they are in addition to being a delight for the palate also easy on the eyes.

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The History of Quality Street

The History of Quality StreetQuality Street is a popular selection of individual tinned or boxed toffees, chocolates and sweets, produced by Nestlé. Quality Street was first made in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England in 1936. It was named after a play by J. M. Barrie.

The History of Quality Street

History

In 1890 John Mackintosh and his wife opened a shop in Halifax, where they created a new kind of sweet by mixing hard toffee with runny caramel. These toffees were made from inexpensive local ingredients such as milk, sugar beets and eggs. They were so successful that in 1898 they expanded the operation to build the world’s first toffee The History of Quality Streetfactory. It burned down in 1909 so John bought an old carpet factory and converted it into a new facility. When John Mackintosh died his son Harold inherited the business and in 1936 he invented Quality Street.

The name was inspired by a play of the same name by J. M. Barrie. In the early 1930s only the wealthy could afford boxed chocolates made from exotic ingredients from around the world with elaborate packaging that often cost as much as the chocolates themselves. Harold Mackintosh set out to produce boxes of chocolates that could be sold at a reasonable price and would, therefore, be available to working families. His idea was to cover the different toffees with chocolate and present them in low-cost yet attractive boxes.

The History of Quality StreetThe History of Quality StreetThe History of Quality Street

Rather than having each piece separated in the box, which would require more costly packaging, Mackintosh decided to have each piece individually wrapped in coloured paper and put into a decorative tin. He also introduced new technology, the world’s first twist-wrapping machine, to wrap each chocolate in a distinctive wrapper. By using a tin, instead of a cardboard box, The History of Quality StreetMackintosh ensured the chocolate aroma burst out as soon as it was opened and the different textures, colours, shapes and sizes of the sweets made opening the tin and consuming its contents a noisy, vibrant experience that the whole family could enjoy.

In the mid- to late 1930s, Britain was still feeling the effects of the economic crash and Mackintosh realised that in times of economic hardship and war, people crave nostalgia. Quality Street chocolates were, therefore, packaged in brightly coloured tins featuring two characters wearing Regency era dress, known affectionately as Miss Sweetly and Major Quality. ‘The Major’ and ‘Miss’, inspired by the play’s principal characters, appeared on all Quality Street boxes and tins until 2000. The original models for the pair were Tony and Iris Coles, the children of Sydney Coles who designed the advertising campaign that first The History of Quality Streetappeared on a front page newspaper advertisement in the Daily Mail on 2 May 1936.

The brand was acquired by Nestlé when they bought Rowntree Mackintosh in 1988

Individual larger versions of the more popular chocolates are now manufactured and sold separately, as an extension to the brand, such as a bar based on the Purple One.

In Western Norway, Quality Street is called “Shetlandsgodt” or more commonly “Shetland Snoop” (snoop is Norwegian slang for sweets), because it often was brought home by fishermen visiting Shetland. In Iceland it is traditionally known as “Mackintosh”.

The History of Quality Street

Quality Street gained the implied endorsement of Saddam Hussein when the Iraqi dictator was reported to have offered them to visiting British politician George Galloway in 2002. Nestlé were initially positive, but then chose to backtrack about the connection.

Text from Wikipedia

Maple Nut Fudge / Fudge med Lønnesirup og Nøtter

A sweet recipe found in “Condenced Milk
and its use in Good Cookery” published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1927

Maple Nut Fudge / Fudge med Lønnesirup og Nøtter

Fudge is a type of confectionery which is made by mixing sugar, butter and milk, heating it to the soft-ball stage at 238° F (116° C), and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency. Fruits, nuts, chocolate, caramel, candies, and other flavors are sometimes added either inside or on top. It is often bought as a gift from a gift shop in tourist areas and attractions.

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The Story of Jelly Beans

The Story of Jelly BeansJelly beans are small bean-shaped sugar candies with soft candy shells and thick gel interiors. The confection comes in a wide variety of colors and flavors, and is primarily made of sugar.

History

The Story of Jelly BeansIt is generally thought that jelly beans first surfaced in 1861, when Boston confectioner William Schrafft urged people to send his jelly beans to soldiers during the American Civil War. It was not until July 5, 1905, that jelly beans were mentioned in the Chicago Daily News. The advertisement publicized bulk jelly beans sold by volume for nine cents per pound, according to the book The Century in Food: America’s Fads and Favorites. Today, most historians contend that jelly beans were first linked with celebrations of Easter in the United States sometime in the 1930s for their egg-like shape.

The American National Jelly Bean Day is on April 22.

Manufacture

The Story of Jelly BeansThe basic ingredients of jelly beans include sugar, corn syrup, and pectin or starch. Relatively minor amounts of the emulsifying agent lecithin, anti-foaming agents, an edible wax such as beeswax, salt, and confectioner’s glaze are also included. The ingredients that give each bean its character are also relatively small in proportion and may vary depending on the flavor.

Most jelly beans are sold as an assortment of around eight different flavors, most of them fruit-based. Assortments of “spiced” jellybeans and gumdrops are also available, which include a similar number of spice and mint flavors. The colors of jelly beans often correspond with a fruit and a “spiced” flavor.

The Story of Jelly BeansSome premium brands, such as Jelly Belly and The Jelly Bean Factory, are available in many different flavors, including berry, tropical fruit, soft drink, popcorn, licorice, and novelty ranges, in addition to the familiar fruit and spice flavors. While these are also sold as assortments, individual flavors can be individually purchased from distributors. A version of the Bertie Botts Every Flavor Beans from the Harry Potter series was made commercially available and included flavors described as earwax, dirt, pepper, and vomit.

Slang

In the electronics industry, a “jelly bean” component is one which is widely available, used generically in many applications, and has no very unusual characteristics—as though it might be grabbed out of a jar in handfuls when needed, like jelly beans. For example, the μA741 might be considered a jelly bean op amp.

The Story of Jelly BeansIn United States slang in the 1910s and early 1920s, a “Jellybean” or “Jelly-Bean” was a young man who dressed stylishly to attract women but had little else to recommend him, similar to the older terms dandy and fop and the slightly later drugstore cowboy. F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a story about such a character, The Jelly-Bean, in 1920. In William Faulkner’s 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury, Jason complained bitterly about his niece Quentin’s promiscuity, remarking that even “the town jellybeans” gave her the “go-by”.

The song “Jelly Bean (He’s a Curbstone Cutie)” was made popular in the 1940s by Phil Harris. It was written by Jimmie Dupre, Sam Rosen, and Joe Verges and published in New Orleans in 1920 by Universal Music Publishers, Inc.

Should you by any chance fancy a look at Jelly Bean (He’s a Curbstone Cutie)  lyrics you can check it out HERE