Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

A hot chocolate dip recipe found on an ad for
Karo and Baker’s published in 1987

Chocolate Plunge / Sjokolade Dip

Indulge in a little hot chocolate, syrup and cream dip during Easter and rescue your conscience by dipping nothing but fresh fruit

Ted
Winking smile

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Orange Syrup / Appelsinsirup

A delicious sweetener recipe found on madogbolig.dk
Orange Syrup / Appelsinsirup

Make your own thick orange syrup, and treat friends and family to the most delicious syrup for pancakes or ice cream.

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Plain Chocolate Caramels / Vanlige Sjokoladekarameller

A caramel recipe found in “Chocolate and Cocoa Recipes
by Miss Parloa” published by Baker’s Chocolate in 1909

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Thin Rye Bread / Tynne Rugbrød

A traditional Norwegian bread recipe found in “Mat til Hverdag
og Fest” (Food for Everydays and Parties) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb

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These are traditional Norwegian crispy thin bread. Often served buttered with traditional soups or casseroles. They can also be eaten buttered and spread with cheese.

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Summer Berry Cordial / Sommerbærsaft

A great recipe for berry cordial found on The English Kitchen
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Marie who runs The English Kitchen writes: Our soft fruit is going great guns in the garden at the moment.   It  all seems to be ripening at once.   We have never gotten so many strawberries as the bumper crop we are enjoying this year!   We  moved them into large pots on the patio, which seems to have agreed with them.  Trust me when I say that  I am not complaining!

With so much coming at once however, it can be somewhat of a challenge to use it.  At present I am drying strawberries, raspberries and black currants in our food dehydrator, and I have frozen bags of  them as well.   This weekend I decided to make a summer fruit cordial with some of them . . . something delicious for us to remember summer with in the colder months ahead.  The nice ones that you can buy in the shops are so very expensive . . . I thought it would be nice to make some of our very own.

A Cordial is a thick syrupy fruit drink, very concentrated.   It can be drunk on it’s own in small quantities, or mixed with sparkling water and poured over ice for a refreshing drink.  You can also make an alcoholic cordial:

If you are familiar with the Anne of Green Gables story, you will remember that on a lovely October day Anne invited her friend Diana over for tea in the afternoon.  Marilla had told her they could have the raspberry cordial that was leftover from the church social. Anne took the wrong bottle and the pair proceeded to get very drunk!

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Traditional Alaskan Simple Rose Hip Syrup / Tradisjonell Enkel Nypesirup fra Alaska

A traditional recipe for a delicious syrup found on homecooking.about.com 
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nyperRose hips, also sometimes spelled as one word rosehips, are the golf-ball sized red fruit of a variety of rose bush that is native to Alaska among other places. Rosehips are a part of the same fruit family as apples and impart a warm, floral, and fruity flavor. Rose hip syrup is a particularly versatile way to use rosehips in the kitchen.

The sweet syrup can be used on pancakes, porridge, or oatmeal in place of the traditional maple syrup. The syrup can also be used as a sweet, floral ingredient in mixed cocktails. And, of course, nothing is better than rose hip syrup drizzled on ice cream, bread pudding, or other desserts – even just plain yoghurt!

Here in Scandinavia we also use rose hips to make a dessert soup served hot or cold depending on the season. The soup is usually served with a dollop sweetened wipped cream. Powdered dried rose hips are also infused in hot water and drunk like you would tea around here – Ted

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Lyle’s Berry Delicious Cheesecake Picnic Puds / Lyle’s Deilige Bær og Ostekake Piknikkrukker

A great picnic idea found on lylesgoldensyrup.comLyle's berry delicious cheesecake picnic puds_post

Simple to make – and even easier to eat! These gorgeous picnic desserts are fresh, fruity and delicious.

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Swedish Sour Milk Bread /Svensk Surmelksbrød

A classic Swedish bread recipe fond on droetker.no236_svensk surmelkbrød_post

Using kefir or sour milk and dark syrup in bread dough was quite common in Scandinavia in the old days, It made the bread stay fresh longer.

Note: Don’t use cornsyrup in this resipe, but Tate & Lyle’s Black Treacle or similar dark syrup – Ted

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In Context:
The sugar cane refining process produced a treacle-like syrup that usually went to waste. In 1883, Charles Eastick, a chemist at the Abram Lyle & Sons (now part of Tate & Lyle) refinery in Plaistow formulated how it could be refined to make a preserve and sweetener for cooking. The resulting product was marketed commercially in 1885 000_tate-lyle_01as “golden syrup”. However, the name ‘golden syrup’ in connection with molasses occurs as early as 1840 in an Adelaide newspaper, the South Australian.

The tin bears a picture of the rotting carcass of a lion with a swarm of bees and the slogan “Out of the strong came forth sweetness”. This is a reference to the Biblical story in chapter 14 of the Book of Judges in which Samson was travelling to the land of the Philistines in search of a wife. During the journey he killed a lion, and when he passed the same spot on his return he noticed that a swarm of bees had formed a comb of honey in the carcass. Samson later turned this into a riddle at a wedding: “Out of the eater came forth meat and out of the strong came forth sweetness”. While it is not known exactly why this image and slogan were chosen, Abram Lyle was a deeply religious man, and it has been suggested that they refer either to the strength of the Lyle company or the tins in which golden syrup is sold.[1] In 1904 they were registered together as a trademark, and in 2006 Guinness World Records declared the mark to be Britain’s oldest brand.[4] Lyle’s golden syrup was awarded a Royal Warrant in 1911.

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In 1921 Lyle’s business merged with Tate, a sugar-refining firm founded by Sir Henry Tate in 1859, to become Tate & Lyle. In 2010 Tate & Lyle sold its sugar refining and golden syrup business to American Sugar Refining.

Originally, golden syrup was a product made at the white sugar refinery from the recovered mother liquor (recovered molasses) “washed” of the raw sugar crystals in the process of creating white sugar. This liquor is generally known as refiners return syrup. Today most golden syrups are produced by a specialist manufacturer by inverting half the refiners return syrup to fructose and glucose and blending it back again; this ensures the product remains liquid and will never crystallize again.

Text from Wikipedia

Thick Gingerbread / Tykke Pepperkaker

A recipe from “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1991

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The funny thing about these cakes is that in Norwegian they are called “pepperkaker” (pepper cakes) although there is no pepper in the ingredients – Ted  😉

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Traditional Parkin / Tradisjonell Parkin

A traditional cake recipe found on thecakerecipe.co.uk
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Parkin or Perkin is a gingerbread cake traditionally made with oatmeal and treacle, which originated in northern England. Often associated with Yorkshire, particularly the Leeds area, it is very widespread and popular in other areas, such as Lancashire.

Parkin is baked to a hard cake but with resting becomes moist and even sometimes sticky. In Hull and East Yorkshire, it has a drier, more biscuit-like texture than in other areas.

Parkin is traditionally eaten on Bonfire Night, 5 November, but is also enjoyed throughout the winter months. It is baked commercially throughout Yorkshire, but is a mainly domestic product in other areas.

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Kefir Bread / Kefirbrød

An old-fashioned bread recipe from “Norsk Ukeblads Store Bakebok” (Norsk Ukeblad’s Large Book on Baking)
published by Ernst G Mortensen’s Forlag in 1984
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Another classic Norwegian bread recipe featuring syrup, but light syrup this time and kefir instead of beer. My mum used Lyle’s Golden Syrup and my sister and I always managed to sneak it out of the cupboard and use it as sandwich spread. Bad for the teeth, but oh so delicious for naughty kids – Ted

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Recipe posted at:
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Cinder Toffee /Slaggkarameller

A classic toffee recipe found on MailOnline165_cinder toffee_post

Geordies call this cinder toffee, as it looks like golden lumps of coal. If you are Australian you will most likely call it honeycomb, if you are Irish it is yellowman and our Scottish chums call it puff candy. Whatever the name, it’s dramatic to make; it volcanically bubbles to the top of your pan while being heated.

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Recipe posted at:
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Wholemeal Rye Bread With Syrup / Grovt Rugbrød Med Sirup

A traditional Norwegian bread recipe from allers.no160_grovbroed med sirup_post

In the old days both dark beer and dark syrup were commonly used in bread dough here in Norway. It made the bread both taste better and stay fresh longer. Bread like this is specially well suited for serving with pickled or potted herring.

My mother often had dark syrup in the dough when she baked bread when I was a kid. I was not particularly fond of it then, but I am now. Sorry Mum – Ted

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Recipe posted at:
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Anise Toffees / Aniskarameller

A delicious sweet recipe found on aperitif.no135_aniskarameller_post

I’ve promised you lots of toffee recipes so here’s another one – Ted

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Recipe posted at:
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Spice Boiled Clementines / Krydderkokte Klementiner

A fresh and delicious Christmas dessert found on
grytelokket.com
 
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A clementine (Citrus ×clementina) is a hybrid between a mandarin and a sweet orange, so named in 1902. The exterior is a deep orange colour with a smooth, glossy appearance. Clementines can be separated into 7 to 14 segments. They tend to be very easy to peel, like a tangerine, but are almost always seedless.

Clementines are very popular in Norway, specially around Christmas and I admit I have already bought 2,5 kg in a nice wooden crate. They’re gone, it took two days 😉

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See this and lots of other delicious recipes on:
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