Traditional Norwegian “Lapskaus” with Brussels Sprouts / Suppelapskaus med Rosenkål

A recipe for a traditional Norwegian dinner soup found in  “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb i 1980
Traditional Norwegian “Lapskaus” with Brussels Sprouts / Suppelapskaus med Rosenkål

Lapskaus is a traditional Norwegian warm dinner dish made of (originally cheap) fried or cooked meat (usually beef or pork), potatoes and various vegetables and spices. The ingredients are cut into cubes, tasted with salt and pepper and boiled to a soup or stew. The dish usually contains vegetables such as carrots, rutabaga and onion and is usually served with flat bread or other types of bread. Lapskaus probably comes from the English word lobscouse; Lob’s course (of lob  and course) meaning that the course have crossed the North Sea at one point in time.

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Traditional Norwegian Smoked Lamb with Onion Sauce / Røkt Lammekjøtt med Løksaus

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on  bygdekvinnelaget.no
Traditional Norwegian Smoked Lamb with Onion Sauce / Røkt Lammekjøtt med Løksaus

Smoking is an old cooking and preserving method for meat and fish. Smoked foods get a distinctive smoked flavor that many people like. While smoking was previously used as a preservation method in the old days, the preservative effect is limited, so smoking is currently used mainly to give taste and aroma to the food here in Norway.

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Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

A traditional recipe from Sweden’s southernmost landscape found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance) published by Cappelen in 1991

Traditional Swedish Cabbage Soup / Tradisjonell Skånsk Kålsuppe

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of Swedish foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato sauce and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love that cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butler’s Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

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Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

A recipe for a classic Norwegian Sunday dinner found in
“Cappelens Kokebok” (Cappelen’s cook Book) published in 1995

Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

Castle Roast is also called Manor House Roast – a nice old Norwegian recipe. The roast is served hot with sauce, boiled potatoes, vegetables
and cranberry jam or rowanberry jelly. A tasty spicy roast
when you want to do some extra out of a Sunday dinner.

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The Truth About the Norwegian Meatballs

The Truth About the Norwegian Meat Balls

If you are not a Norwegian you might think that what you see on the picture above is a relatively simple traditional Norwegian dinner. I admit that it looks innocent enough, but it is far from. The dish above is the yardstick with which every newlywed woman in Norway is measured.

Her reputation as a housewife is placed on the scales the first time she makes meatballs for her husband. What sort of mince meat is she useing, what sort of spices. Does she serve them with stewed cabbage or stewed peas. With just the fat from the frying pan or a propper sauce. And most important around here, does she serve it with propper cranberry jam or just fresh cranberries stirred with sugar.

The worst thing for the young woman is that she has no way of knowing how to get it right, because what it all comes down to is, does her husband say when he taste them; “They are not as good as my mother’s” or “These were delicious, luv.”

Her reputation is as you now understand in the hands of her mother-in-law’s cooking. And worst is, said mother-in-law may be the crappiest cook for miles around, her devoted son will love her crappy meatballs anyway.


Traditional food is no joking matter around this
neck of the woods I can tell you

Ted
Winking smile

Liver with Apples and Bacon / Lever med Epler og Bacon

A dinner recipe found in “Gode, Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good,
Old-fashiond Recipes) in the “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) series published by Gyldendal in 1991

Liver with Apples and Bacon / Lever med Epler og Bacon

Beef and lamb liver is well suited for this dish. Lamb liver may have a slightly drier texture than beef’s, but many people still like lamb liver the best. Do not fry the liver slices for too long. They should be pink and soft in the center. If you’re fond of onions you can cut an onion in slices and fry them in butter or margarine before placing them on top of the liver slices.

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Traditional Danish Cold Potato Salad with Frikadells / Kold Kartoffelsalat med Frikadeller

A traditional Danish lunch/dinner recipe
found on
 familiejournal.dk
Traditional Danish Cold Potato Salad with Frikadells / Kold Kartoffelsalat med Frikadeller

Cold potato salad with frikadells is a nice old-fashioned Danish dish
that can be enjoyed by everyone.

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Traditional Swedish Boiled Lamb in Dill Sauce / Kokt Lamm i Dillsås

A classic Swedish recipe for boiled lamb in dill sauce
found on
receptfavoriter.seTraditional Swedish Boiled Lamb in Dill Sauce / Kokt Lamm i Dillsås

A classic Swedish recipe for boiled lamb in dill sauce. Serve the dish with boiled potatoes, crispbread and beer. Instead of fresh dill you can use frozen finely chopped dill at the end.

If you use lamb with bones, don’t remove them (they add great taste). if you got room for it all in the saucepan that is.

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Traditional Norwegian Sodd / Tradisjonell Sodd

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on spar.noTraditional Norwegian Sodd / Tradisjonell Sodd

Lamb meat cooked with fresh autumn vegetables is traditional food that tastes great. Sodd is considered both everyday and party food and is really suitable for both!

Sodd is not really a soup in the usual meaning of the word but more an intermediate between soups and a light casseroles. But who cares, the dish tastes absolutely amazing –Ted

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Grated Potato Balls and Smoked Pork Knuckle / Raspeball med Røkt Svineknoke

Traditional Norwegian grub at its best. Recipe found on godt.no
Grated Potato Balls and Smoked Pork Knuckle / Raspeball med Røkt Svineknoke

It’s the same if you call the grated balls Komle, Potetball or Klubb; This is cheap and delicious Norwegian traditional food.

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Faggots and Mushy Peas / Faggots og Mushy Peas

A classic pub-grub recipe found on Picture Britain
Faggots and Mushy Peas / Faggots og Mushy Peas

Abigail Rogers Young who runs Picture Britain writes: This would be one of those snigger-behind-your-hand British/American language differences. I’m sure that you Brits simply live for the look on your American friends’ faces when you say, “Oh yes, we’re having faggots and mushy peas for lunch. Oh, some mash as well, and we’ll cover the whole thing in gravy!”

This traditional British dish (also known as “savoury ducks”) seems to have been concocted for the purpose of using up absolutely every part of a pig that you would never eat otherwise, and was especially popular with the rationing of World War II. The “good old-fashioned way” to make faggots is with a pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavoring, and sometimes bread crumbs. The mixture is shaped into balls, wrapped with caul fat (the omentum membrane from the pig’s abdomen), and baked. Tasty, innnit?

So, my non-British friends, if you want to impress your dinner guests with your expertise in international cuisine, really make them wonder, or just want to gross them out, here is the recipe for British faggots (and please don’t forget the marrowfat peas!).

I have eaten this dish for lunch at countless pubs all over the UK and
can assure you that it’s infinitely more tasty than it sounds like. But I’m
Norwegian and we eat a lot of strange things here as well

Ted
Winking smile

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New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

A classic dinner recipe found in “What’s New in Cookery” published by Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co in 1928
New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

When Grover Cleveland took over the presidency from Chester A. Arthur in 1885, he inherited more than a new address and the nation’s problems. He came into a legacy of epicurean dining that he loathed. The former President had liked his food with its nose in the air: dits of foie gras, dots of charlotte russe; he even dandified his macaroni pie by adding oysters. Cleveland, a regular Joe of simple tastes, put up with the fancy food; but one night, catching a whiff of corned beef and cabbage being eaten by the servants, the president traded his Arthurian meal for theirs. “It was the best dinner I had had for months,” he later beamed.

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Old-fashioned Norwegian Mutton Soup / Gammeldags Kjøttsuppe

An old-fasioned Norwegian soup recipe found on mytaste.no
Old-fashioned Norwegian Mutton Soup / Gammeldags Kjøttsuppe

Good bread and old-fashioned soup is the recipe
for a tasty dinner

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Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

A traditional Norwegian dish found on matprat.no
Traditional Norwegian Stewed Fish / Plukkfisk

Traditional food with an asumed origin from Western Norway. These days, this dish is eaten all over the country, and every “stewed fish family” have their own recipe. Some people use plain cod or stock fish instead of lightly salted cod. Some families may swear to pollock, but there is one thing they all have in common. A really tasty meal.

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Classic Norwegian Griddle Cakes / Klassiske Lapper

A classic Norwegian griddle cake recipe found on godt.noClassic Norwegian Griddle Cakes / Klassiske Lapper

These griddle cakes are always popular and very quick to make. This recipe also contains little fat, which makes the the cakes suitable as everyday food.

Serve the cakes with homemade jams. And if you want to make the kids extra eager, you can sprinkle chopped chocolate on the cakes while they cook, nothing beats chocolate griddle cakes!

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