Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

A classic Norwegian side dish recipe found on frukt.no
Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

Stewed cabbage is a classic Norwegian side dish that you easily make yourself. It is usually served with meat balls, dinner sausages and any sort of smoked meat.

You can buy packages of half finished stewed cabbage (cooked, dried cabbage flakes and the dry ingredients for the sauce) at most grocers here in Norway, but the result is nothing compared with what you get if you cook stewed cabbage from scratch yourself.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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The History of Lutefisk

An article found on whatscookingamerica.netLutefisk_01

It is said that about half the Norwegians who immigrated to America came in order to escape the hated lutefisk and the other half came to spread the gospel of lutefisk’s wonderfulness.

– Norwegian-American saying

Lutefisk History

Lutefisk (pronounced lewd-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it.  It is rinsed with cold water to remove the lye, then boiled or baked, and then served with butter, salt, and pepper.

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The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello.  It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey.  In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, “Once a year is probably enough!”

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches.  Usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year.  The dinners have become so popular that lovers of this special cod dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

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The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings.  On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod.  The returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire.  Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained.  The fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush.  Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish.  They rinsed the fish in water to remove the lye and make it edible, and then boiled it.  The story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it “not bad.”

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Norwegian-Americans believe that lutefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat.  Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.


In general I love traditional Norwegian food, both the food eaten during celebrating Christmas and the traditional food eaten the year round. Having said as much that love does not embrace lutefisk, but if it is served with enough crispy bacon and mushy peas as it usually is here in Norway I do eat it.

Ted
Winking smile