Apple and Blackberry Crumble / Smulepai med Epler og Bjørnebær

A classic British dessert recipe found on BBC food
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Paul Hollywood adds a twist to the traditional crumble topping with the addition of seeds, oats and shony, a sweet and salty powdered seaweed. Serve with custard, cream or ice cream.

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Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

A classic Norwegian side dish recipe found on frukt.no
Homemade Stewed Cabbage / Hjemmelaget Stuet Kål

Stewed cabbage is a classic Norwegian side dish that you easily make yourself. It is usually served with meat balls, dinner sausages and any sort of smoked meat.

You can buy packages of half finished stewed cabbage (cooked, dried cabbage flakes and the dry ingredients for the sauce) at most grocers here in Norway, but the result is nothing compared with what you get if you cook stewed cabbage from scratch yourself.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Hernekeitto – Finnish Pea Soup / Finsk Ertesuppe

A classic Finnish soup recipe found in “Kullinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

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All the Nordic countries have their own version of pea soup as do most countries in the world I guess. This is the Finnish take on the soup – Ted

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Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

A classic Scndinavian waffle recipe found on aperitif.no
Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

Waffle Day on 25 March is a Swedish invention, and why it is celebrated rests on a misunderstanding. The day is the same as “Vårfruedag” – the day Virgin Mary learns that she is with child. “Vårfruedag” turned over time into “Vaffeldag” (Waffle Day) in Sweden but also here in Norway, it was customary to celebrate “Vårfruedag” with cakes.

Although we feel an ownership to waffles here in Scandinavia, similar cakes are eaten most places in the world. They can be round or square, thick or thin – the heart-shaped waffles is however typical of Scandinavia. The first electric waffle iron was designed by General Electric and entered the market in 1911.

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Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

A delicious Swiss roll recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Drømmegod Rullekake / Dreamlike Roly Poly

Jelly Roll, Swiss Roll or Roly Poly is an old English recipe. The earliest published reference for a rolled cake spread with jelly was in the Northern Farmer, a journal published in Utica, New York, in December 1852. Called “To Make Jelly Cake”, the recipe describes a modern “jelly roll” and reads: “Bake quick and while hot spread with jelly. Roll carefully, and wrap it in a cloth. When cold cut in slices for the table.”

The terminology evolved in America for many years. From 1852 to 1877 such a dessert was called: Jelly Cake (1852), Roll Jelly Cake (1860), Swiss Roll (1872), Jelly Roll (1873), and Rolled Jelly Cake (1876). The name “Jelly Roll” was eventually adopted.

The origin of the term “Swiss roll” is unknown. The earliest British reference to a rolled cake by that name appeared on a bill of fare dated 18 June 1871, published in the 1872 book A Voyage from Southampton to Cape Town, in the Union Company’s Mail Steamer “Syria” (London). A recipe for “Swiss roll” also appeared in the U.S. that same year in The American Home Cook Book, published in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872.

Several 1880s to 1890s cookbooks from London, England, used the name Swiss roll exclusively.

The American Pastry Cook, published in Chicago in 1894, presented a basic “Jelly Roll Mixture” then listed variants made from it that included a Swiss roll, Venice roll, Paris roll, chocolate roll, jelly roll cotelettes, and decorated jelly rolls.

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Bacon Pancakes / Fleskepannekaker

A classic Norwegian dinner recipe found in “Gode Gamle Oppskrifter” (Good Old Recipes) published by Gyldendal in 1991
Bacon Pancakes / Fleskepannekaker

The childhood dream in the old days for many Norwegian children was to eat bacon pancakes as often as they wanted, and as many as possible. But pancakes takes time to cook, and there were usually several people round the table, so the cakes had often dispensed equally between the them.

One hardly ever hear of people eating bacon pancakes  any more. That’s a pity really, because it is a delicious dish, particularly served with lingonberry jam as suggested in the recipe – Ted

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Bee Stings / Bistikk

A traditional Norwegian cake recipe found in “Gjærbakst”
(Yeast Baking) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

Bee Stings / Bistikk

Please don’t ask me how a cake can end up with a name like Bee Sting. I can’t imagine anyone finding anything remotely positive with getting a bee sting yet the cake is absolutely delicious. It’s a strange world is all I can say – Ted 😉

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St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Brown Sticks / Brune Pinner

A traditional Norwegian cookie recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
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These cookies are often baked for Christmas in Norway, but many have the sense to enjoy them the year round. They were not part of my mother’s seven sorts baked for the holiday season, but I’ve had the good fortune to be offered them elsewhere both as a kid and as an addult. Delicious stuff I can tell you – Ted

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Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

A classic Scottish biscuit recipe found on allrecipes.com
Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

This shortbread cookie is a traditional Scottish recipe. These are round cookies sandwiched with jam and topped off with a delicious icing and a cherry.

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Faggots With Onion Gravy / Faggots Med Løksaus

A traditional British dinner recipe found on BBCgoodfood
Faggots With Onion Gravy / Faggots Med Løksaus

Just to clearify: Faggots are a traditional dish in the UK, especially South and Mid Wales and the Midlands of England. It is made from meat off-cuts and offal, especially pork. A faggot is traditionally made from pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavouring and sometimes bread crumbs.

Faggots originated as a traditional cheap food of ordinary country people in Western England, particularly west Wiltshire and the West Midlands. Their popularity spread from there, especially to South Wales in the mid-nineteenth century, when many agricultural workers left the land to work in the rapidly expanding industry and mines of that area.

Faggots are also known as “ducks” in the Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Lancashire, often as “Savoury Ducks”. The first use of the term in print was in the Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser on Saturday June 3  1843, a news report of a gluttonous man who ate twenty of them.

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