Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

A baking recipe from “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Coffee Nut Cupcakes / Cupcakes med Kaffe og Nøtter

Yet another of those eats for adults from the book that tells you the story of coffee and gives you recipes for coffee tasting goodies.

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Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

A tasty scones recipe found on oetker.no
Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

These scones are plain, meaning without added fruit, but they are light, airy and have just the right amount of crusty surface that makes them the perfect backdrop for the vanilla and maple syrup butter.

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Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

A classic Norwegian bun recipe found on tine.no
Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

Nothing tastes better than fresh yeast bakery. It does not have to be a special occasion, these buns can be enjoyed fresh any day or you can freeze them and serve them should you get unexpected guests. You get about 20 buns from this recipe.

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Danish Apple Dessert / Dansk Epledessert

A classic Danish dessert fount in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) utgitt av Tupper Ware i 1970

Danish Apple Dessert / Dansk Epledessert

Not unlike a traditional Norwegian dessert, Tilslørte bondepiker (Veiled Peasant Girls) that I posted a recipe for back in 2014 – Ted

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Spanish Cream / Spansk Krem

A dessert recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by Borden’s Condenced
Milk Company in 1927

Spanish Cream / Spansk Krem

The recipes and instructions in these old cookbooks from the 1920s are so short and to the point that if housewives and cooks from back then had a chance to take a look in today’s cookbooks with all their explanations and pictures and what have you, they would probably thing we are all right behind the barn as they say in the Yorkshire Dales.

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Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

An ice cream recipe found in “Condenced Milk and its use
in Good Cookery” published by  Borden’s Condenced Milk
Company in 1927

Chocolate Ice Cream / Sjokoladeis

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Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A dessert recipe found in “Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published by Borden’s Condenced Milk Company
in the 1930s

Baked Cup Custard / Ovnsbakt Vaniljepudding

A delicious baked dessert sweetened with sugar, maple syrup or honey.

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Daffodil Cake / Påskeliljekake

A fancy cake recipe just right for the upcoming Easter
found in “Igleheart Cake Secrets” published in 1928
Daffodil Cake / Påskeliljekake

This is the second of these old Igleheart’s cookbooks from the 1920s I’m posting from and again I’m struck by how little baking recipes and traditions have changed over the years in comparison with other food. We seem to like cakes and cookies to be as they always have been and I find that rather pleasant in our modern world of constant change – Ted

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A Brief History of Vanilla

A Brief History of Vanilla

Vanilla is the only fruit-bearing member of the orchid family and is native to central Mexico. The ancient Totonac Indians of Mexico were A Brief History of Vanillathe first to learn to use the fruit of the Tlilxochitl vine, vanilla pods. After their defeat by the Aztecs, they were forced to relinquish control of the exotic fruit.

The Aztecs were, in turn, defeated by the Spanish, who returned home with the precious vanilla beans – which were for many years, enjoyed only by the nobility and the very rich. Eventually, the use of vanilla, while still quite expensive, became widespread throughout Europe.

Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing vanilla to the United States in the late 1700s. While serving as Ambassador to France, he learned the use of vanilla beans, and when he returned to the A Brief History of VanillaUnited States, brought vanilla beans with him.

Today, vanilla beans are grown in several distinct regions of the world. This produces vanilla beans with unique regional characteristics and attributes, each particularly suited to different uses.

Madagascar, the world’s largest producer of vanilla beans, is the source of the famed Madagascar Bourbon vanilla and still produces the world’s finest and most consistent vanilla. (Incidentally, the term “Bourbon” has nothing to do with the liquor produced in Kentucky – but rather, derives its name from the old name for Madagascar – the Bourbon Islands.)

Madagascar Bourbon vanilla is considered to be the highest quality pure vanilla available, typified by a creamy, sweet, smooth, mellow flavor. Madagascar Bourbon Vanilla is known for its “staying power”, which makes it especially suited to pairing with rich foods.

A Brief History of Vanilla

Mexico, where vanilla originated, now produces only a small percentage of the harvest. Mexican vanilla beans, grown by skilled producers that carefully harvest and cure every pod. It’s this process that produces Mexican vanilla of exceptionally high quality and flavor.

Spicy Mexican vanilla is known by its creamy flavor that complements dishes that contain chocolate, cinnamon and other warm spices. A teaspoon or so of Mexican vanilla in tomato sauces or with citrus can also help reduce acidity.

A Brief History of VanillaThe last of the four major vanilla-producing regions is Tahiti. Tahitian vanilla, grown from a different genus of vanilla orchid (Vanilla Tahitensis Moore), is flowery, fruity and smooth.

Long a favorite of professional bakers and pastry chefs, Tahitian vanilla is known for its aromatic, fruity, cherry, anise-like flavor profile. Tahitian Pure Vanilla has a particular affinity to fruity flavors such as fruited yogurts, sorbets and fruit toppings.

Text from earthy.com

Chocolate Sponge anno 1927 / Sjokoladepudding anno 1927

A classic chocolate dessert found in “Knox Gelatine – Dainty Desserts  – Candies – Salads” published in 1927
Chocolate Sponge_post

I mentioned in the previous post that I loved thin pancakes, but to be honest, I’m sort of a all round dessert kind of guy. So you might already have guessed, I love chocolate desserts too

Ted
Winking smile

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Walnut Milk / Valnøttmelk

A recipe for a dairy free milk found on bhg.com
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Silky nut milks are a great alternative to traditional dairy milks
and are surprisingly simple to make.
For a smoother milk, strain with a cheesecloth.

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Homemade Irish Cream / Hjemmelaget Irish Cream

A recipe for a bit of the strong stuff found on BBCfood
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Homemade Irish cream is a real treat, served it chilled with plenty of ice or sneak a drop or two into your coffee.

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Old Fashioned Marble Cake / Gammeldags Marmorkake

A classic baking recipe found in “Formkaker” (Mould Baked Cakes) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981 
Old Fashioned Marble Cake / Gammeldags Marmorkake

Old fashioned marble cake – a favorite back in  grandmother’s days, and just as popular today.

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Orange Syrup / Appelsinsirup

A delicious sweetener recipe found on madogbolig.dk
Orange Syrup / Appelsinsirup

Make your own thick orange syrup, and treat friends and family to the most delicious syrup for pancakes or ice cream.

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Mocha Crêpes with Pears / Mokka Crêpes med Pærer

A fancy dessert recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980
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Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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