Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

A soup recipe found in “Flavours of Hungary Recipes”
a free E-book publiched by the Hungarian
Agricultural Marketing Centre in 2009Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

Proper ingredients are necessary but not sufficient for full success. The Hungarian “art de la table” does not only cover the ingredients but also the method of preparation. The special flavours of the traditional Hungarian cuisine are produced by the combination of tasty ingredients of excellent quality with their specific mode of preparation.

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Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

A classic side dish found in “Varme Småretter” (Small Hot
Dishes) in the  “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) series
publishd by Gyldendal i 1991

Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

If you think it’s a lot of work to first cook the vegetables and then gratinate them afterwards, you can use deep-frozen vegetables as a starting point.

Deep frozen broccoli or a blend of summer vegetables are excellent. Put the vegetables deep frozen in the mould and pour the sauce over them. Calculate 4-5 minutes longer in the oven for the frozen ones.

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Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

A vegetarian starter recipe found in “Knudsen Recipes For Greater Food Value” published by Knudsen Creamery Co in 1957Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

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In Context

Iceberg lettuce is one of the main constituents in salads and is known for its crunchy texture. It has comparatively less nutrients than the other greens that you may find in salads.

Nutritional Facts
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of potassium and manganese, as well as a very good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous. It also contains traces of sodium, copper, and zinc.

Vitamin Content
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and vitamin C. It is also a good source of thiamin, vitamin B6, and folate (vitamin B9).

Caloric Content
Iceberg lettuce contains 14 calories per 100 grams. It mainly contains water and dietary fiber. This food is low in sodium and is also very low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Weight Loss
Iceberg lettuce has a high water content and is very low in calories. Therefore, it is good for weight loss efforts.

Promotes Good Health
It is rich in vitamin A which is an essential vitamin required for healthy eyes, growth and development of bones and strengthening of immune system.

New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

A classic dinner recipe found in “What’s New in Cookery” published by Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co in 1928
New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

When Grover Cleveland took over the presidency from Chester A. Arthur in 1885, he inherited more than a new address and the nation’s problems. He came into a legacy of epicurean dining that he loathed. The former President had liked his food with its nose in the air: dits of foie gras, dots of charlotte russe; he even dandified his macaroni pie by adding oysters. Cleveland, a regular Joe of simple tastes, put up with the fancy food; but one night, catching a whiff of corned beef and cabbage being eaten by the servants, the president traded his Arthurian meal for theirs. “It was the best dinner I had had for months,” he later beamed.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

pickles

Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

A classic take on fish soup found in “Fisk og Skalldyr”
(Fish and Shellfish) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

Fish soup with vegetables is a delicacy. And it is inexpensive food because the basic broth is made from fish heads, skin and bones.

Here you got a basic recipe, which can be varied with different species of fish. For example, choose cod, haddock, pollock or whiting.

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Moroccan Garbanzo Bean Stew / Marokkansk Garbanzobønnestuing

A vegatarian stew recipe found in “We love Comfort Food –
Meatless Monday Recipes”  a free E-book publlished
by American Heart Association
Moroccan Garbanzo Bean Stew / Marokkansk Garbanzobønnestuing

The chickpea or chick pea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its different types are variously known as gram, or Bengal gram, garbanzo or garbanzo bean, Egyptian pea. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

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Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matprat.no
Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

Traditionally soups like this were made with hens, not chicken. Clear soup like this is lean food, still  filling and satisfying. In addition, it is very reasonably priced food. Just remember that hen meat need a relatively long cooking time.

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Bamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

A Thai inspired beef recipe found on baltimoresun.comBamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

Chef Chen Lin Chang at Bamboo Garden in Bel Air draws inspiration from across Asia. In his crispy beef dish, he focuses on the cuisine of Thailand. Thai food is known for its intense flavors, liberal use of fresh vegetables and — sometimes — extreme heat. Though the dishes often taste complex, they can be fairly simple to replicate at home.

The key to this dish is in the sauce — a sweet, salty, tangy mixture with a spicy twist. The preparation is straightforward, and the recipe is customizable. It works with many different cuts of beef, and the vegetables included (and their quantities) can be adjusted by preference and season. Thai crispy beef is a great way to make use of whatever is growing in your summer garden.

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Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker

A vegetable patty recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
published by Gotham Steel

Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker
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Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the morning glory family Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. In some parts of the English-speaking world, sweet potatoes are locally known by other imagesnames such as kumara, but people usually confused it with yam due to their similar appearances. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple. Sweet potato cultivars with white or pale yellow flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink or orange flesh.

Ipomoea batatas is native to the tropical regions in the Americas. Of the approximately 50 genera and more than 1,000 species of Convolvulaceae, I. batatas is the only crop plant of major importance—some others are used locally (e.g. I. aquatica “kangkong”), but many are poisonous. The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown as ornamental plants under the name tuberous morning glory, used in a horticultural context.

Pasta Con I Fagioli – Soup with White Beans and Noodles / Suppe med Hvite Bønner og Nudler

A classic soup recipe found in “Ganske Enkelt -Italiensk Kokebok” (Quite Simply – Italian Cook Book)
published by Notabene Forlag in 1995

Pasta Con I Fagioli – Soup with White Beans and Noodles / Suppe med Hvite Bønner og Nudler

I love working with cookbooks with thumbnails like in this one, but
I really shouldn’t because it means a lot more work. I have build the final image out of one large, four small ones and add the numbers on top. Takes about three times as long as preparing a single picture
for posting. But I’m a designer and our minds don’t work like
normal people’s does

Ted
Winking smile

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Vegetable Pottage / Grønnsakssuppe

A everyday soup recipe for ordinary people
found on
cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval MondayVegetable Pottage_post

People have eaten a lot of soup throughout the ages, ever since they had made the first cooking pots that would withstand heat. In Tudor times, it was still the main part of an ordinary person’s diet. It was basically a vegetable soup, flavoured with herbs and thickened with oats. 

Ordinary people would not have been able to afford much meat, so they would rely on this soup as their staple diet together with bread and cheese. Occasionally meat bones or fish would be added when available.

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Madeline’s Lemon Butter Sauce / Madelines Sitronsmørsaus

A vegetable sauce recipe from a slightly cheesy ad for
Sunkist Lemons  published in 1972
Madeline’s Lemon Butter Sauce / Madelines Sitronsmørsaus
Was it the candle lights, the soft music, or the little lemon trick on the vegetables that got to Arnold the night he proposed? Madeline  Nagel doesn’t care. It worked.

In 1972 Sunkist Lemons ran a whole series of ads build over the same slightly cheesy mould like this one. all based on women succeeding at cooking with lemon zest and lemon juice or both impressing boyfriends, in-laws or husband’s bosses. Al with a same rather mortifyingly bad text. The recipes that followed weren’t all that shabby though.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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