German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

A traditional German soup recipe found in“Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970
German PotatoSoup / Tysk Potetsuppe

The Germany cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region. Some regions of Germany, like Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share dishes with Austrian and parts of Swiss cuisine.

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Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Recipe for a spicy everyday dinner found on aperitif.no
 Taco Meatballs with Mashed Veggies / Tacokjøttboller med grønnsaksmos

Even though it’s a workday, it does not mean you have to eat boring food for that reason. With a simple twist, you can make a traditional dish new and exciting, like with this recipe.

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One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

A camp fire one pot dinner recipe found on I heart Naptime
One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

Easy healthy dinner recipe made with simple real
ingredients in just one pot.

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Sausage Omelette Variations / Pølseomelettvariasjoner

4 recipes for sausage filled omelettes found in “Mini Kokebok –
Pølser” (Mini Cook Book – Sausages) published by the
Norwegian Information Office for Meat

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Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

A meatless pie recipe from the Tudor era
found at historyextra.com

 Tudor Vegetable Pie / Grønnsakspai fra Tudortiden

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, a vegetable pie from the Tudor era.

Sam writes: This 1596 recipe for a “pie of bald meats [greens] for fish days” was handy for times such as Lent or Fridays when the church forbade the eating of meat (another similar recipe is called simply Friday Pie). Medieval pastry was a disposable cooking vessel, but in the 1580s there were great advancements in pastry work. Pies became popular, with many pastry types, shapes and patterns filled with everything from lobster to strawberries. This pie’s sweet/savoury combo is typical of Tudor cookery. I enjoyed it, but was glad I’d reduced the sugar content.

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Traditional Norwegian “Lapskaus” with Brussels Sprouts / Suppelapskaus med Rosenkål

A recipe for a traditional Norwegian dinner soup found in  “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb i 1980
Traditional Norwegian “Lapskaus” with Brussels Sprouts / Suppelapskaus med Rosenkål

Lapskaus is a traditional Norwegian warm dinner dish made of (originally cheap) fried or cooked meat (usually beef or pork), potatoes and various vegetables and spices. The ingredients are cut into cubes, tasted with salt and pepper and boiled to a soup or stew. The dish usually contains vegetables such as carrots, rutabaga and onion and is usually served with flat bread or other types of bread. Lapskaus probably comes from the English word lobscouse; Lob’s course (of lob  and course) meaning that the course have crossed the North Sea at one point in time.

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Grilled Scallops and Crayfish with Hot Salad / Grillet Kamskjell og Sjøkreps med Varm Salat

A seafood appetizer recipe found on godfisk.no
Grilled Scallops and Crayfish with Hot Salad / Grillet Kamskjell og Sjøkreps med Varm Salat

Scallops and crayfish tails only take a moment on the grill before they are ready to serve. In this recipe, the season’s delicious vegetables are accessories, so celebrate summer!

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Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

A recipe for a classic Norwegian Sunday dinner found in
“Cappelens Kokebok” (Cappelen’s cook Book) published in 1995

Traditional Norwegian Castle Roast / Slottsstek

Castle Roast is also called Manor House Roast – a nice old Norwegian recipe. The roast is served hot with sauce, boiled potatoes, vegetables
and cranberry jam or rowanberry jelly. A tasty spicy roast
when you want to do some extra out of a Sunday dinner.

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Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

A soup recipe found in “Flavours of Hungary Recipes”
a free E-book publiched by the Hungarian
Agricultural Marketing Centre in 2009Bean Soup Jókai Style / Bønnesuppe Jókai Style

Proper ingredients are necessary but not sufficient for full success. The Hungarian “art de la table” does not only cover the ingredients but also the method of preparation. The special flavours of the traditional Hungarian cuisine are produced by the combination of tasty ingredients of excellent quality with their specific mode of preparation.

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Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

A classic side dish found in “Varme Småretter” (Small Hot
Dishes) in the  “Ingrids Beste” (Ingrid’s Best) series
publishd by Gyldendal i 1991

Cheese Gratinated Vegetables / Ostegratinerte Grønnsaker

If you think it’s a lot of work to first cook the vegetables and then gratinate them afterwards, you can use deep-frozen vegetables as a starting point.

Deep frozen broccoli or a blend of summer vegetables are excellent. Put the vegetables deep frozen in the mould and pour the sauce over them. Calculate 4-5 minutes longer in the oven for the frozen ones.

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Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

A vegetarian starter recipe found in “Knudsen Recipes For Greater Food Value” published by Knudsen Creamery Co in 1957Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

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In Context

Iceberg lettuce is one of the main constituents in salads and is known for its crunchy texture. It has comparatively less nutrients than the other greens that you may find in salads.

Nutritional Facts
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of potassium and manganese, as well as a very good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous. It also contains traces of sodium, copper, and zinc.

Vitamin Content
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and vitamin C. It is also a good source of thiamin, vitamin B6, and folate (vitamin B9).

Caloric Content
Iceberg lettuce contains 14 calories per 100 grams. It mainly contains water and dietary fiber. This food is low in sodium and is also very low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Weight Loss
Iceberg lettuce has a high water content and is very low in calories. Therefore, it is good for weight loss efforts.

Promotes Good Health
It is rich in vitamin A which is an essential vitamin required for healthy eyes, growth and development of bones and strengthening of immune system.

New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

A classic dinner recipe found in “What’s New in Cookery” published by Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co in 1928
New England Boiled Dinner with Cranberry Pudding / New England Kokt Middag med Tyttebærpudding

When Grover Cleveland took over the presidency from Chester A. Arthur in 1885, he inherited more than a new address and the nation’s problems. He came into a legacy of epicurean dining that he loathed. The former President had liked his food with its nose in the air: dits of foie gras, dots of charlotte russe; he even dandified his macaroni pie by adding oysters. Cleveland, a regular Joe of simple tastes, put up with the fancy food; but one night, catching a whiff of corned beef and cabbage being eaten by the servants, the president traded his Arthurian meal for theirs. “It was the best dinner I had had for months,” he later beamed.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

pickles

Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

A classic take on fish soup found in “Fisk og Skalldyr”
(Fish and Shellfish) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980
Fish Soup – Basic Recipe / Fiskesuppe – Grunnoppskrift

Fish soup with vegetables is a delicacy. And it is inexpensive food because the basic broth is made from fish heads, skin and bones.

Here you got a basic recipe, which can be varied with different species of fish. For example, choose cod, haddock, pollock or whiting.

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Moroccan Garbanzo Bean Stew / Marokkansk Garbanzobønnestuing

A vegatarian stew recipe found in “We love Comfort Food –
Meatless Monday Recipes”  a free E-book publlished
by American Heart Association
Moroccan Garbanzo Bean Stew / Marokkansk Garbanzobønnestuing

The chickpea or chick pea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its different types are variously known as gram, or Bengal gram, garbanzo or garbanzo bean, Egyptian pea. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

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