Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

A youth party suggestion with menu and recipes found in
“Vi Skal Ha Gjester” (We’re Having Guests)
published by Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag in 1969

Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

I found working with the last post so entertaining that I just had to do another post from the same book although both are more more work than most posts. Because if you think arranging a party for your young ones would provide less problems than serving crabs to a couple of friends you are absolutely mistaken.

The set of worries maybe different, but the chance of ending with egg on your face was indeed present. And all the worries about what would happen to your furniture and floors came on top of that.


I was sixteen in 1969 and I must admit that the parties I went to back then were home-alone-parties that didn’t have the slightest likeness to the parties described in this book. If not totally Sex Drugs & Rock’n’Roll we were close enough.

Ted
Winking smile

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Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

An easy fish dinner recipe found in “Mat For Alle” (Food For Everyone) published by Tiden Norske Forlag in 1985
Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

This is an easy fish casserole that you can make while the potatoes or rice is cooking. Use fresh fish fillet or half defrosted fish in block.

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Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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Blandaball / Mixed Balls

A Norwegian fish speciality found in “God Mat Fra Sjøen”
(Great Food From The Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984
Blandaball / Mixed Balls

This dish from Western Norway is for many, I must admit an acquired taste. My x-wife’s mother used to serve it quite often and quite honestly, it took me some time to appreciate it. Mixing ground fish, onion and potatoes may seem like a strange thing to do, but when you get used to it, it actually is quite delicious – Ted

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Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

A Caucasian chicken  recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

The cuisine of the Caucasus includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.

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Mash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

A great winter dinner recipe found on jamieoliver.comMash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

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Cabaret / Kabaret

A classic Scandinavian recipe found at Jacobs.noCabaret_post

A traditional dish from Scandinavian smorgasbords. usually served with fresh white bread and remulade sauce. Cabaret was frequently on the coffee table on the weekends in my childhood home. Usually we ate it while we watching the weekend entertainment on television.

I must confess that I’ve never made it myself or even eaten it since, although I enjoyed it a lot back then – Ted 🙂

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Lamb Casserole with Root Vegetables / Lammegryte med Røtter

A autumn dinner recipe found in “Cappelens Kokebok”
(Cappelen’s Cook Book) published in 1991
lammegryte med røtter_post

This is a traditional Norwegian autumn dish. Together with “Mutton in Cabbage” it was served after the lambs were slaughtered in the autumn.

Around this time of the year the grocers here in Norway fill up with lambs meat particularly suite for these two dishes so, yes, the tradition is fortunately still alive – Ted

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Settlers’ Casserole / Nybyggergryte

A dinner recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1979

nybyggergryte_post

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The Gladiators Swore by Vegetables

gladiators

Barley and vegetables gave the gladiators a protective layer of fat.

The Roman gladiators ate almost only barley and vegetables. This shows in a survey of skeletons from a number of graves found in the city of Ephesus in Turkey today.

The surprising diet was due to the fact that gladiators did not like meat. According to anthropologist Karl Großschmidt from Medical University of Vienna the vegetarian diet full of carbohydrates and protein gave the gladiators a thick layer of fat that could make the difference between life and death in the arena.

“A thick layer of fat protects against cuts and hides neural pathways and vital blood vessels. If you just get hurt in the fat layer, you can still fight on” explains Großschmidt.

Drank a mixture of charcoal and bone ash

The strict vegetarian diet did however not provided the gladiators with the calcium they needed to strengthen their bones. To remedy this they drank according to historical sources a mixture of burnt wood and ash from burned bones, which contained large amounts of calcium.

This information is confirmed by the new studies, which show that gladiators bones contained concentrations of calcium which was far higher than among the general population.

Text from historienet.no (translated)

Pot Au Feu – French Pot-Roast / Fransk Gryterett

A recipe from “The Betty Crocker Recipe Card Library”
published in 1971

Meat - Pot Au Feu C

This French version of the family pot-roast traditionally simmer at the back of the range. Serve it simply from the pot it cooks in or pay its flavourful excellence the compliment of an elegant tureen like this one of handsome tin-lined copperware.

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Lobster Lunch / Hummer Lunsj

A fancy lunch recipe found on godt.no
lobster roll_godt_post

This is simply a small lobster sandwich. It’s nice fresh bread stuffed with homemade lobster salad; You use good quality hot dog buns or halved baguettes and a fully cooked lobster.

The most complicated part of this dish is to clean the boiled lobster; if you have not done this before, it is quite amazing how much fumbling it might take to get it done  😉

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Belgian Oxtail Soup / Belgisk Oksehalesuppe

A classic soup recipe found in “Supper og Sauser” (Soups and Sauces) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980oksehalesuppe fra belgia_post

Oxtail (occasionally spelled ox tail or ox-tail) is the culinary name for the tail of cattle. Formerly, it referred only to the tail of an ox or steer, a castrated male. An oxtail typically weighs 2 to 4 lbs. (1–1.8 kg) and is skinned and cut into short lengths for sale.

Oxtail is a bony, gelatin-rich meat, which is usually slow-cooked as a stew or braised. It is a traditional stock base for a soup. Although traditional preparations often involve hours of slow cooking, modern methods usually take a shortcut by utilizing a pressure cooker. Oxtail is the main ingredient of the Italian dish coda alla vaccinara.

It is a popular flavour for powder, instant and premade canned soups in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Oxtails are also one of the popular bases for Russian aspic appetizer dishes (холодец or студень), along with pig trotters or ears or cow “knees”, but are the preferred ingredients among Russian Jews because they can be Kosher.

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