Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matprat.no
Chickens Soup with Dumplings / Hønsesuppe med Melboller

Traditionally soups like this were made with hens, not chicken. Clear soup like this is lean food, still  filling and satisfying. In addition, it is very reasonably priced food. Just remember that hen meat need a relatively long cooking time.

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Bamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

A Thai inspired beef recipe found on baltimoresun.comBamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

Chef Chen Lin Chang at Bamboo Garden in Bel Air draws inspiration from across Asia. In his crispy beef dish, he focuses on the cuisine of Thailand. Thai food is known for its intense flavors, liberal use of fresh vegetables and — sometimes — extreme heat. Though the dishes often taste complex, they can be fairly simple to replicate at home.

The key to this dish is in the sauce — a sweet, salty, tangy mixture with a spicy twist. The preparation is straightforward, and the recipe is customizable. It works with many different cuts of beef, and the vegetables included (and their quantities) can be adjusted by preference and season. Thai crispy beef is a great way to make use of whatever is growing in your summer garden.

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Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker

A vegetable patty recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
published by Gotham Steel

Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker
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Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the morning glory family Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. In some parts of the English-speaking world, sweet potatoes are locally known by other imagesnames such as kumara, but people usually confused it with yam due to their similar appearances. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple. Sweet potato cultivars with white or pale yellow flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink or orange flesh.

Ipomoea batatas is native to the tropical regions in the Americas. Of the approximately 50 genera and more than 1,000 species of Convolvulaceae, I. batatas is the only crop plant of major importance—some others are used locally (e.g. I. aquatica “kangkong”), but many are poisonous. The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown as ornamental plants under the name tuberous morning glory, used in a horticultural context.

Pasta Con I Fagioli – Soup with White Beans and Noodles / Suppe med Hvite Bønner og Nudler

A classic soup recipe found in “Ganske Enkelt -Italiensk Kokebok” (Quite Simply – Italian Cook Book)
published by Notabene Forlag in 1995

Pasta Con I Fagioli – Soup with White Beans and Noodles / Suppe med Hvite Bønner og Nudler

I love working with cookbooks with thumbnails like in this one, but
I really shouldn’t because it means a lot more work. I have build the final image out of one large, four small ones and add the numbers on top. Takes about three times as long as preparing a single picture
for posting. But I’m a designer and our minds don’t work like
normal people’s does

Ted
Winking smile

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Vegetable Pottage / Grønnsakssuppe

A everyday soup recipe for ordinary people
found on
cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval MondayVegetable Pottage_post

People have eaten a lot of soup throughout the ages, ever since they had made the first cooking pots that would withstand heat. In Tudor times, it was still the main part of an ordinary person’s diet. It was basically a vegetable soup, flavoured with herbs and thickened with oats. 

Ordinary people would not have been able to afford much meat, so they would rely on this soup as their staple diet together with bread and cheese. Occasionally meat bones or fish would be added when available.

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Madeline’s Lemon Butter Sauce / Madelines Sitronsmørsaus

A vegetable sauce recipe from a slightly cheesy ad for
Sunkist Lemons  published in 1972
Madeline’s Lemon Butter Sauce / Madelines Sitronsmørsaus
Was it the candle lights, the soft music, or the little lemon trick on the vegetables that got to Arnold the night he proposed? Madeline  Nagel doesn’t care. It worked.

In 1972 Sunkist Lemons ran a whole series of ads build over the same slightly cheesy mould like this one. all based on women succeeding at cooking with lemon zest and lemon juice or both impressing boyfriends, in-laws or husband’s bosses. Al with a same rather mortifyingly bad text. The recipes that followed weren’t all that shabby though.

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Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

A traditional Norwegian soup recipe found on matoppskrift.no
Pea Soup from Western Norway / Ertesuppe fra Stryn

This pea soup that originates from Stryn was widely served during harvesting and threshing back in the old days. All vegetables that was available was generally used, as well as the meat or flesh that could be used. The beef, mutton or pork was usually smoked, dried or salted. It was standard to serve the soup with flatbread and always with boiled potatoes. The flatbread was usually dipped in the broth during the meal.

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

A youth party suggestion with menu and recipes found in
“Vi Skal Ha Gjester” (We’re Having Guests)
published by Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag in 1969

Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

I found working with the last post so entertaining that I just had to do another post from the same book although both are more more work than most posts. Because if you think arranging a party for your young ones would provide less problems than serving crabs to a couple of friends you are absolutely mistaken.

The set of worries maybe different, but the chance of ending with egg on your face was indeed present. And all the worries about what would happen to your furniture and floors came on top of that.


I was sixteen in 1969 and I must admit that the parties I went to back then were home-alone-parties that didn’t have the slightest likeness to the parties described in this book. If not totally Sex Drugs & Rock’n’Roll we were close enough.

Ted
Winking smile

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Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

An easy fish dinner recipe found in “Mat For Alle” (Food For Everyone) published by Tiden Norske Forlag in 1985
Fish In Curry Sauce / Fisk i Karrisaus

This is an easy fish casserole that you can make while the potatoes or rice is cooking. Use fresh fish fillet or half defrosted fish in block.

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Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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Blandaball / Mixed Balls

A Norwegian fish speciality found in “God Mat Fra Sjøen”
(Great Food From The Sea) published by Gyldendal in 1984
Blandaball / Mixed Balls

This dish from Western Norway is for many, I must admit an acquired taste. My x-wife’s mother used to serve it quite often and quite honestly, it took me some time to appreciate it. Mixing ground fish, onion and potatoes may seem like a strange thing to do, but when you get used to it, it actually is quite delicious – Ted

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Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

A Caucasian chicken  recipe found in “The Best of
International Cooking” published by Hamlyn in 1984

Caucasian Chicken / Kaukasisk Kylling

The cuisine of the Caucasus includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.

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Mash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

A great winter dinner recipe found on jamieoliver.comMash-Topped Beef & Guinness Pie / Oksekjøtt og Guinness Pai med Potetmoslokk

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Cabaret / Kabaret

A classic Scandinavian recipe found at Jacobs.noCabaret_post

A traditional dish from Scandinavian smorgasbords. usually served with fresh white bread and remulade sauce. Cabaret was frequently on the coffee table on the weekends in my childhood home. Usually we ate it while we watching the weekend entertainment on television.

I must confess that I’ve never made it myself or even eaten it since, although I enjoyed it a lot back then – Ted 🙂

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