Etikasilakat – Finnish Sweet and Sour Herring / Finsk Sursøt Sild

A Finish starter recipe found in i “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970

Etikasilakat – Finnish Sweet and Sour Herring / Finsk Sursøt Sild

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Swedish Dill Meat / Klassiskt Dillkött

An old Swedish Classic dinner recipe from godmat.org
Swedish Dill Meat / Klassiskt Dillkött

A delicious old classic from the Swedish cuisine.

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Pork Chops with Red Onion Marmalade / Koteletter med Rødløksmarmelade

A juicy pork chops recipe found on aperitif.no
Pork Chops with Red Onion Marmalade / Koteletter med Rødløksmarmelade

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Traditional Norwegian Raspberry Vinegar / Bringebæreddik

An old-fashioned way to conserve raspberries frukt.no
Traditional Norwegian Raspberry Vinegar / Bringebæreddik

Make a bottle or two of raspberry vinegar, then you have a delicious basis for dressings and desserts. It’s also a great host gift to bring along when you’re invited for dinner or tea.

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Creamy Shrimp Salad Bites / Kremede Rekesalatmunnfuller

A party snack/canapé recipe found on chatelaine
https://recipereminiscing.wordpress.com/kremede-rekesalatmunnfuller/Creamy Shrimp Salad Bites / Kremede Rekesalatmunnfuller

Cooked frozen shrimp is a great time saver when preparing for a party.

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Herb Mayonnaise / Urtemajones

A recipe found in“Alt Om Urter” (All About Herbs)
published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1985

Herb Mayonnaise / Urtemajones

This green mayonnaise is the best accessory for cold salmon or trout, hard boiled egg or cold fish in aspic.

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Traditional Warm German Potato Salad / Tradisjonell Tysk Varm Potetsalat

A traditional German recipe found on sparkrecipes.com
Traditional Warm German Potato Salad / Tradisjonell Tysk Varm Potetsalat

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Mango Chutney

A condiment recipe found at BBCfood
Mango Chutney

Mango Chutney

Mango chutney is the classic accompaniment to curry – try making your own with this simple recipe.  While this homemade mango chutney is delicious with curry, try it with cold meats to jazz up leftovers.

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Babi Kecap – Balinese Pork Fillet in Soy Sauce / Balinesisk Svinefilet i Soyasaus

A pork recipe found in “Cappelens Internasjonale kjøkken – Indonesia” (Cappelen’s International Kitchen – Indonesia)
published in 1994

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Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colourful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavour. It is diverse, in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 17,508 in the world’s largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia home. Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences. Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important. Indonesia’s cuisine may include rice, noodle and soup dishes in modest local eateries to street-side snacks and top-dollar plates.

In 2011, Indonesian cuisine began to gain worldwide recognition, with three of its popular dishes make it to the list of ‘World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods (Readers’ Pick)’, a worldwide online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International. Rendang top the list as the number one, followed closely by nasi goreng in number two, and satay in number fourteen.

Indonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences. Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. The cuisines of Eastern Indonesia are similar to Polynesian and Melanesian cuisine. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.

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Grilled Scampi with Garlic / Kjempereker med Hvitløk

A shellfish recipe found in “Grillmat” (Grilled Food)
in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket” (The Kitchen Library)
series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992

Grilled Scampi with Garlic / Kjempereker med Hvitløk

Scampi is raw when you buy them, yet like other shellfish, they
need just a short time on the grill.

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History in a Jar -The Story of Pickles

An article by Tori Avey published on The History Kitchen in 2014

tigriscleopatraIt is rumored that they were one of Cleopatra’s prized beauty secrets. They make apperances in the Bible and in Shakespeare’s writing. Pregnant women have been known to crave them along with ice cream. Pickles have been around for thousands of years, dating as far back as 2030 BC when cucumbers from their native India were pickled in the Tigris Valley. The word “pickle” comes from the Dutch pekel or northern German pókel, meaning “salt” or Shakespeare“brine,” two very important components in the pickling process. Throughout history pickling was a necessity, as it was the best way to preserve food for a long period of time. As one of the earliest mobile foods, pickles filled the stomachs of hungry sailors and travelers, while also providing families with a source of food during the cold winter months.

Pickles are created by immersing fresh fruits or vegetables in an acidic liquid or saltwater brine until they are no longer considered raw or vulnerable to spoilage. When we think of pickles, cucumbers commonly come to mind. Pickled cucumbers are often lacto-fermented in saltwater brine. During this process lactic microbial organisms develop, which turn the naturally occurring sugars of foods into lactic acid. In turn, the environment becomes acidic quickly, making it impossible for any spoiling bacteria to multiply. Cucumber pickles can also be made with a salt and vinegar brine, a popular choice for home cooks. The brine, known as “pickle juice,” is sometimes used by athletes to treat dehydration, though it has yet to be proven as a true remedy.

pickles

Kosher dills have a unique history of their own. In The Book of Jewish Food, Claudia Roden explains that pickled vegetables were a dietary staple for Jews living in the Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Russia. The sharp flavor of pickles proved a welcome addition to the bland bread-and-potato diet of these cold weather countries. For several generations, it was an autumn custom for Ashkenazim to fill barrels with cucumbers, beets and shredded cabbage. The mixture was left to ferment in a warm place for several weeks, then relocated to cool, dark cellars. The pickles would last through the long cold winter until spring, when new crops of fresh produce were available.

New York 1900When a heavy influx of eastern European Jews arrived in New York City during the late 1800s and early 1900s, immigrants introduced kosher dill pickles to America. Cucumbers were washed, then piled in large wooden barrels along with dill, garlic, spices, kosher salt and clean water. They were left to ferment for a few weeks to several months; shorter fermenting time produced brighter green “half sours,” while longer fermentation resulted in “full sours.” Pickles were sold on pushcarts in the immigrant tenement district of New York City. Over time, Jewish-owned shops selling pickles straight out of the barrel began appearing in droves. Eventually, pickling became a profitable business within the Jewish community. Today, a plate of pickles is usually served complimentary with a meal at the best Jewish delis.

masonHome pickling was made much easier and more sanitary during the 1850s, when two essential canning tools were invented. First, a Scottish chemist by the name of James Young created paraffin wax, which helped to create a seal for food preserved in jars. A few years later, John Mason developed and patented the first Mason jar. Mason’s jars were made from a heavyweight glass that was able to tolerate the high temperatures used in canning and processing pickles.

Of course, pickles aren’t limited to the dill and cucumber variety. They can be sweet, sour, salty, hot or all of the above. Pickles can be made with cauliflower, radishes, onions, green beans, asparagus and a seemingly endless variety of other vegetables and fruits. When the English arrived in the New World, they brought their method for creating sweet pickles with vinegar, sugar and spiced syrup. Eastern Europeans introduced various forms of lacto-fermented cabbage, known as sauerkraut. The French serve tiny, spiced cornichons with heavy pâtés and pungent cheeses. In the Middle East pickles are served with every meal, from peppers to olives to lemons. Russians pickle tomatoes, among other things. Koreans have their kimchi, the Japanese pickle plums and daikon, and Italians pickle eggplants and peppers. Each area of the world has its own beloved variety of pickle.

Honey Glazed Chicken / Honningglasert Kylling

A spring dinner recipe found in “Fjærfe på Menyen” (Poultry
on the Menu) piblished by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1984
Honey Glazed Chicken / Honningglasert Kylling

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Boeuf Lyonaise

A classic lunch dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Boeuf Lyonaise

This dish is closely related to the salad Parisienne. Both are based on the same basic ingredients. The biggest difference is that one is a warm meal while the other is a cold one. The dish is excellent to turn to when you have some leftover roast beef or other types of beef.

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In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here

Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten Meieriprodukter

A cake recipe from “So Delightful -50 Dairy-Free Recipes That Are Truly So Delicious” published by So Delicious Dairy Free
Dairy-Free Marzipan Tea Cake/ Marsipantekake Uten MeieriprodukterApart from being dairy-free this cake is also soy-free.

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Medieval Monday – Perre

A Medieval sidedish resipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingPerre_post

Take green peas, and boil them in a pot; And when they are broken, draw the broth a good quantity through a strainer into a pot, And sit it on the fire; and take onions and parsley, and hew them small together, And cast them thereto; And take powder of Cinnamon and pepper and cast thereto, and let boil; And take vinegar and powder of ginger, and cast thereto; And then take Saffron and salt, a little quantity, and cast thereto; And take fair pieces of pandemaine, or else of such tender bread, and cut it in fair morsels, and cast thereto; And serve it so forth.

From Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II

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