Honey and Mustard Sauce / Honning- og Sennepssaus

A medieval spicy sauce recipe found at cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval Monday_headingHoney and Mustard Sauce_post

Mustard was much used by the Romans and later was very popular with the Anglo Saxons. It grew locally and so was cheap. It could be used to makes sauces for meat and fish as well as dressings for salads. It helped to preserve other foods as well as having healthy properties of its own.

The sauces were generally made from a mixture of ground mustard seeds, vinegar, wine and often honey, with spices or other flavourings added according to what people liked.

They could then be stored for several weeks. Mustard’s ‘hotness’ gets less after it is mixed and kept for a few days, which may account for the strength of the sauces often made – which would be much too hot for most of us today.

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Lumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

A fourteenth century recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingLumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

saaraSaara whe runs Let Hem Boyle writes: I have to say that I love mustard! All different kinds of… it can be strong, mild, vinegary, spiced.. I do like them all. Making mustard for an event has been a plan for long time, but I haven’t done it until Midwinter Feast. This recipe is great! You can make it beforehand and store it in the fridge. It will be good stored in fridge for couple of weeks.

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

Original recipe from Forme of Cury, 1390

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Basic Homemade Country Mustard / Grunnleggende Hjemmelaget Landsens Sennep

An easy condiment recipw found on homecooking.about.com
Basic Homemade Country Mustard / Grunnleggende Hjemmelaget Landsens Sennep

Mustard is one of those condiments that comes in many flavors, textures, and varieties. While most Americans are all too familiar with the smooth, bright yellow store-bought varieties, it would be a shame not to experience the more complex flavors of homemade varieties. If you’re new to mustard-making, this recipe is a great place to start. This basic country mustard is a pungent, grainy, all-purpose mustard that uses both coarsely ground mustard seeds and mustard powder.

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Mussels In Dressing / Blåskjell i Dressing

A simple quick and delicious starter recipe found in “Forretter” (Starters) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Mussels In Dressing / Blåskjell i Dressing

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Salsa Verde – Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

A classic Continental cold sauce recipe found in
“God Mat fra Hele Verden” (Nice Food From All Over the Word)
published by Schibsted in 1971

Salsa Verde - Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

One usually think of this sauce as a typical Italian specialty, but as it turns out also in Germany is it known, as a specialty comming from Frankfurt.

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Cheese Sandwich with Bacon, Pear and Caramelized Onions / Ostesmørbrød med, Bacon, Pære og Karamellisert Løk

A greatrecipe for cheese sandwiches found on aperitif.no
Cheese Sandwich with Bacon, Pear and Caramelized Onions

When cheese sandwiches are made with so much love as these you got real party fare. This recipe has that little extra that turns you into a kitchen hero.

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Medieval Monday – Sauge – Chicken with Sage Sauce / Kylling med Salviesaus

A 15th Century recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingSauge – Chicken with Sage Sauce_post

A recipe from From the 15th Century cook book Harleian MS. 279, Volume I, found on One Year and Thousand Eggs a treasure chest of a blog for anyone interested in medieval recipes.

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Caponata Palermitana – Sicilian Sweet & Sour Vegetables / Sicilianske Sur-Søte Grønnsaker

A vegetarian lunch recipe from “The Sainsbury
Book of Italian Cooking” published in 1979

caponata palermitana_post

A delicious vegetable lunch dish full of Mediterranean goodies. Serve it with fresh ciabattas og en Ruffino Classico and close your eyes and imagine yourself seated at a sidewalk table in Palermo. Sounds nice doesn’t it, particularly here in Oslo, where the winter’s first snow fell yesterday – Ted  😉

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Medieval Monday – A Bold 12th Century Sauce for the Lords / En Kraftig Saus for Lorder fra det 12. Århundre

A recipe from the 12th Century Found on
A Taste of History with Joyce WhiteMedieval Monday_heading
A Bold 12th Century Sauce for the Lords_post

How to Prepare a Sauce for the Lords
and How Long it Lasts

One takes cloves and nutmeg, cardamom, pepper, cinnamon—that is canel—and ginger, all in equal amounts, except that there should be as much canel as all the other spices; and add twice as much toasted bread as of everything else, and grind them all together, and blend with strong vinegar, and place it in a cask. This is a lordly sauce, and it is good for half a year.

Joyce White who runs A Taste of History with Joyce White writes about the recipe above: This is another recipe from “Libellus de arte coquinaria”, An Early Northern Cookery Book, edited by Rudolph Grewe and Constance B. Hieatt in 2001, a translation of the oldest known collections of European recipes written sometime during the Middle Ages. The original text of the cookbook is believed to be lost, but there are four collections of recipes (codices) that appear to all come from it. They are written in the local vernacular languages of northern Europe: Danish, Icelandic and Low German. There are about 35 recipes contained in these four separate codices, and the oldest might date back as far as the 12th century.

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Thin Rye Bread / Tynne Rugbrød

A traditional Norwegian bread recipe found in “Mat til Hverdag
og Fest” (Food for Everydays and Parties) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb

tynne rugbrød_post

These are traditional Norwegian crispy thin bread. Often served buttered with traditional soups or casseroles. They can also be eaten buttered and spread with cheese.

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How to Make Homemade Goat Cheese with Lemon Juice / Slik Lager Du Hjemmelaget Geitost med Sitronsaft

A recipe for homemade cheese found on about.com/food/How to Make Homemade Goat Cheese with Lemon Juice_cheese.about_post

If you want to make a very simple version of homemade goat cheese, this recipe using lemon juice and goat’s milk is the one. The acidity in the lemon juice thickens the milk and makes soft curds form. Once the liquid is drained away from the curds, viola, you have a basic but tasty version of homemade goat cheese.

White vinegar can also be used to make homemade goat cheese, although the lemon flavor is slightly more pleasing in the finished product.

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The History of Condiments

condiments_01Since ancient times people have used condiments to enhance their food. The first condiment was salt. Salt has always been used both as a preservative and to enhance the flavor of food. Vinegar has also been used since ancient times. Its name is probably derived from the French words vin aiger meaning sour wine. (Vinegar was used as a medicine as well as a food).

The Romans liked condiments and they made many sauces for their food. One of the most common was a fish sauce called liquamen. The Romans also grew mustard and they introduced it into the parts of Europe they conquered. They also made mint sauce.

condiments_02In the Middle Ages mustard was a popular condiment in Europe. At first English mustard consisted of coarse powder and it was not very strong. However in 1720 a Mrs Clements of Durham began making a much smoother mustard powder. When mixed with water to make paste it was very hot but it proved to be popular and Durham became a center of the mustard industry. (For centuries mustard was used as a medicine as well as a food).

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries new condiments were invented. Pesto sauce was invented in 16th century Italy. Furthermore new sauces were invented in the 17th century including bechamel and chasseur. Chutney comes from India. It was first exported to England in the 17th century. Soy sauce, which was invented in China reached Europe in the 17th century and by the mid-18th century it was popular in Britain.

condiments_03According to one story a French chef first made mayonnaise in 1756. However there are many stories about where it comes from. Hollandaise sauce was also first recorded in the mid-18th century. Ketchup began life as a Chinese fish sauce called ke-tsiap. The name was gradually changed to ketchup and in Britain people added other ingredients instead of fish. In the 18th century they began adding tomatoes. Sauces similar to tartar sauce were made in the Middle Ages but ‘modern’ tartar sauce was first made in the 1800s

condiments_04In the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution condiments began to be mass-produced in factories. Tomato ketchup was a best seller and HP sauce was invented at the end of the 19th century. Meanwhile Worcester sauce was invented in Worcester in 1835 by John Lea and William Perrins. Horseradish sauce went on sale in bottles in the USA around 1860. Salad cream was invented in 1914.

As well as sauces people have also looked for ways to sweeten their food. Since the time of the Ancient Egyptians and probably before people have kept bees for honey. Over condiments_05the centuries honey was very valuable and it was sometimes used as a currency or it was given as a tribute to a conqueror. Since ancient times people have also made an alcoholic drink called mead from honey.

Sugar cane first grew in South Asia. Later the Arabs and Europeans grew sugar cane. At the end of the 15th century sugar cane was taken to the New World. Sugar was first made from sugar beet in the 18th century. A German chemist called Andreas Marggraf was the first person to make sugar from beet in 1747. Saccharine was invented in 1879 by Constantine Fahlberg.

Text from localhistories.org

1840 Farm Pancakes / 1840 Gårdspannekaker

An 18th century recipe found on food52.com
1840 Farm Pancakes_food52_post

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In Context: The Ancient Greeks made pancakes called τηγανίτης (tēganitēs), ταγηνίτης (tagēnitēs) or ταγηνίας (tagēnias), all words deriving from τάγηνον (tagēnon), “frying pan”. The earliest attested references on tagenias are in the works of the 5th century BC poets Cratinus and Magnes. Tagenites were made with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk, and were served for breakfast. Another kind of pancake was σταιτίτης (staititēs), from σταίτινος (staitinos), “of flour or dough of spelt”, derived from σταῖς (stais), “flour of spelt”. Athenaeus mentions, in his Deipnosophistae, staititas topped with honey, sesame, and cheese. The Middle English word Pancake appears in English in the 15th century.

The Ancient Romans called their fried concoctions “alia dulcia,” which was Latin for “other sweets”. These were much different from what are known as pancakes today.

Text from Wikipedia

Switchel; the Original Energy-Ade

An 18th century energydrink found on savouringthepast.netSwitchel - The Original Energy-Ade_post

Jas. Townsend and Son who runs SavouringThePast writes What do you drink if you’re worn out and need a little kick? An Ade, soda, an energy boost? In the 18th century, before supermarkets had shelves lined with this stuff,  many people drank a delicious beverage called Switchel.

Beverages similar to Switchel date all the way back to ancient Greece, and were drank all the way around the world. This recipe was typical of those popular in America from New England all the way to the Caribbean.

Of course regional influences made for local flares. In Vermont, for example, Switchel was made with Maple Syrup and mixed with oatmeal. (The oatmeal was eaten as a snack once the beverage was finished.) While in Trinidad the drink was almost always mixed with special branches from the quararibea turbinata plant. (Also known as the swizzlestick tree.)

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How to Make Farmer’s Cheese / Hvordan Lage Gårdsost

A recipe for homemade cheese found on about.com/food
How to Make Farmer's Cheese_cheese.about_post

Farmer’s cheese is a simple, very mild cheese with a crumbly texture. It is really easy to make at home with this simple farmer’s cheese recipe.

To add more flavor, mix fresh herbs in with the curds or sprinkle herbs on top of the finished farmer’s cheese with olive oil and red pepper flakes. Farmer’s cheese can be eaten with bread or crackers, or crumbled on top of salads.

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