Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

A clamb recipe found in “Gryteretter” (Casseroles)
by Jennie Reekie published in Norwegian in 1977
Lamb in Yogurt Sauce / Lam i Yoghurtsaus

The lamb yogurt combination is known from a lot of different
cousins. We know it from Greece, North Africa the Indian subcontinent
and several other places. The book gives no clue to where this recipe comes from but an educated guess might place it in Northern Africa

Ted
Winking smile

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Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

A seafood lunch recipe found in “Sundt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

Dill gives the sauce a warm, sweet taste. In combination with the cucumber it becomes an excellent accompaniment to the salmon.

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Oat Porridge and Compote of Dried Fruit / Havregrøt og Kompott av Tørket Frukt

A breakfast recipe from “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988
Oat Porridge and Compote of Dried Fruit / Havregrøt og Kompott av Tørket Frukt

A bowl full of steaming, old-fashioned oat porridge taste great with spicy fruit compote and a dollop of yogurt on top.

I grew up eating oat porridge every weekday as a kid. Mom soaked the oats over night and made the porridge in the morning. It was not a fancy kind like the one above, just plain porridge with a little milk and a drizzle of sugar, but I loved it anyway – Ted

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Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

A classic Scndinavian waffle recipe found on aperitif.no
Apple Waffles With Ice Cream And Raspberries / Eplevafler Med Is Og Bringebær

Waffle Day on 25 March is a Swedish invention, and why it is celebrated rests on a misunderstanding. The day is the same as “Vårfruedag” – the day Virgin Mary learns that she is with child. “Vårfruedag” turned over time into “Vaffeldag” (Waffle Day) in Sweden but also here in Norway, it was customary to celebrate “Vårfruedag” with cakes.

Although we feel an ownership to waffles here in Scandinavia, similar cakes are eaten most places in the world. They can be round or square, thick or thin – the heart-shaped waffles is however typical of Scandinavia. The first electric waffle iron was designed by General Electric and entered the market in 1911.

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St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A classic British pierecipe foung on BBCgoodfood
St Clement’s Pie / St Clements Pai

A very British version of Key lime pie – an indulgent, creamy pai with tangy oranges and lemons.

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Dill and Walnut Yogurt / Dill og Valnøtt Yoghurt

A classic English appetizer recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985

Dill and Walnut Yogurt / Dill og Valnøtt Yoghurt

This yogurt may be served as an appetizer with pita bread or as an accompaniment to spicy rice dishes.

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Salsa Verde – Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

A classic Continental cold sauce recipe found in
“God Mat fra Hele Verden” (Nice Food From All Over the Word)
published by Schibsted in 1971

Salsa Verde - Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

One usually think of this sauce as a typical Italian specialty, but as it turns out also in Germany is it known, as a specialty comming from Frankfurt.

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Creamy Dreamy Chicken Korma / Kremet Drømmeaktig Kylling Korma

A classic Indian chicken recipe found on TescoRealFood
Creamy Dreamy Chicken Korma / Kremet Drømmeaktig Kylling Korma

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Lyle’s Banana, Pecan and Cinnamon French Toast / Lyles Arme Riddere med Banan, Pekannøtter og Kanel

A delicious French Toast recipe found on lylesgoldensyrup.com
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This sweet sandwich with sliced banana, chopped pecans and Lyle’s Golden Syrup is perfect for a morning treat. Tastes even better with a side of yoghurt!

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Yogurt Bread / Yoghurtbrød

A really juicy bread recipe found on spar.no
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Fresh bread is always nice, and if you have a few hours to spare one day you can easily bake your own.

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The History of Yogurt

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Analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus genome indicates that the bacterium may have originated on the surface of a plant. Milk may have become spontaneously and unintentionally exposed to it through contact with plants, or bacteria may have been transferred from the udder of domestic milk-producing animals.

The origins of yogurt are unknown, but it is thought to have been invented in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC.

In ancient Indian records, the combination of yogurt and honey is called “the food of the gods”. Persian traditions hold that “Abraham owed his fecundity and longevity to the regular ingestion of yogurt”.

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The cuisine of ancient Greece included a dairy product known as oxygala (οξύγαλα) which is believed to have been a form of yogurt. Galen (AD 129 – c. 200/c. 216) mentioned that oxygala was consumed with honey, similar to the way thickened Greek yogurt is eaten today.

The oldest writings mentioning yogurt are attributed to Pliny the Elder, who remarked that certain “barbarous nations” knew how “to thicken the milk into a substance with an agreeable acidity”. The use of yogurt by medieval Turks is recorded in the books Diwan Lughat al-Turk by Mahmud Kashgari and Kutadgu Bilig by Yusuf Has Hajib written in the 11th century. Both texts mention the word “yogurt” in different sections and describe its use by nomadic Turks. The earliest yogurts were probably spontaneously fermented by wild bacteria in goat skin bags.

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Some accounts suggest that Indian emperor Akbar’s cooks would flavor yogurt with mustard seeds and cinnamon. Another early account of a European encounter with yogurt occurs in French clinical history: yogurt_11Francis I suffered from a severe diarrhea which no French doctor could cure. His ally Suleiman the Magnificent sent a doctor, who allegedly cured the patient with yogurt. Being grateful, the French king spread around the information about the food which had cured him.

Until the 1900s, yogurt was a staple in diets of people in the Russian Empire (and especially Central Asia and the Caucasus), Western Asia, South Eastern Europe/Balkans, Central Europe, and India. Stamen Grigorov (1878–1945), a Bulgarian student of medicine in Geneva, first examined the microflora of the Bulgarian yogurt. In 1905, he described it as consisting of a spherical and a rod-like lactic acid-producing bacteria. In 1907, the rod-like bacterium was called Bacillus bulgaricus (now Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus).

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The Russian Nobel laureate and biologist Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (also known as Élie Metchnikoff), from the Institut Pasteur in Paris, was influenced by Grigorov’s work and hypothesized that regular consumption of yogurt was responsible for the unusually long lifespans of Bulgarian peasants. Believing Lactobacillus to be essential for good health, Mechnikov worked to popularize yogurt as a foodstuff throughout Europe.

Isaac Carasso industrialized the production of yogurt. In 1919, Carasso, who was from Ottoman Salonika, started a small yogurt business in Barcelona, Spain, and named the business Danone (“little Daniel”) after his son. The brand later expanded to the United States under an Americanized version of the name: Dannon.

Yogurt with added fruit jam was patented in 1933 by the Radlická Mlékárna dairy in Prague.

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Yogurt was introduced to the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, influenced by Élie Metchnikoff’s The Prolongation of Life; Optimistic Studies (1908); it was available in tablet form for those with digestive intolerance and yogurt_12for home culturing. It was popularized by John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, where it was used both orally and in enemas, and later by Armenian immigrants Sarkis and Rose Colombosian, who started “Colombo and Sons Creamery” in Andover, Massachusetts in 1929.

Colombo Yogurt was originally delivered around New England in a horse-drawn wagon inscribed with the Armenian word “madzoon” which was later changed to “yogurt”, the Turkish name of the product, as Turkish was the lingua franca between immigrants of the various Near Eastern ethnicities who were the main consumers at that time. Yogurt’s popularity in the United States was enhanced in the 1950s and 1960s, when it was presented as a health food. By the late 20th century, yogurt had become a common American food item and Colombo Yogurt was sold in 1993 to General Mills, which discontinued the brand in 2010.

Text from Wikipedia

Raspberry Sorbet / Bringebærsorbet

A nice summer dessert from the now defunct magasin.info
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If you have got an ice machine, it is easy to make this yummy raspberry sorbets. You can of course also make it in a regular freezer, but then you should stir the sorbets a few times during the freezing to insure that the dessert gets porous and light.

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Lyle’s Berry Delicious Cheesecake Picnic Puds / Lyle’s Deilige Bær og Ostekake Piknikkrukker

A great picnic idea found on lylesgoldensyrup.comLyle's berry delicious cheesecake picnic puds_post

Simple to make – and even easier to eat! These gorgeous picnic desserts are fresh, fruity and delicious.

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1840 Farm Pancakes / 1840 Gårdspannekaker

An 18th century recipe found on food52.com
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In Context: The Ancient Greeks made pancakes called τηγανίτης (tēganitēs), ταγηνίτης (tagēnitēs) or ταγηνίας (tagēnias), all words deriving from τάγηνον (tagēnon), “frying pan”. The earliest attested references on tagenias are in the works of the 5th century BC poets Cratinus and Magnes. Tagenites were made with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk, and were served for breakfast. Another kind of pancake was σταιτίτης (staititēs), from σταίτινος (staitinos), “of flour or dough of spelt”, derived from σταῖς (stais), “flour of spelt”. Athenaeus mentions, in his Deipnosophistae, staititas topped with honey, sesame, and cheese. The Middle English word Pancake appears in English in the 15th century.

The Ancient Romans called their fried concoctions “alia dulcia,” which was Latin for “other sweets”. These were much different from what are known as pancakes today.

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Greek Lamb Balls on Skewers with Tzatziki / Greske Lammeboller på Spyd med Tzatziki

A classic Greek recipe found on matprat.no
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Tzatziki (English pronunciation: /tætˈsiːki/, /tsætˈsiːki/, or /tɑːtˈsiːki/; Greek: τζατζίκι [dzaˈdzici] or [dʒaˈdʒici] or in Cypriot Greek: τταλαττούρι ) is a Greek sauce served with grilled meats or as a dip. Tzatziki is made of strained yogurt (usually from sheep or goat milk) mixed with cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and sometimes dill. American versions may include lemon juice, mint, or parsley.

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