Cannelloni – Baked and Stuffed Pasta Rolls / Innbakte og Fylte Pastaruller

A classic Italian recipe found in “Ganske Enkelt – Italiensk Kokebok” (Quite Simply – Italian Cookbook) published by Notabene Forlag in 1996
Cannelloni – Baked and Stuffed Pasta Rolls / Innbakte og Fylte Pastaruller

Cannelloni (pronounced [kannelˈloːni]; Italian for “large reeds”) are a cylindrical type of pasta generally served baked with a filling and covered by a sauce in Italian cuisine. Some types of cannelloni need to be boiled beforehand, while for others it is enough to use a more dilute sauce or filling.

Popular stuffings include spinach and ricotta or minced beef. The sauces typically used are Napoletani underneath and besciamella sauce to cover the top.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge italian_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Apple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

A fresh acidic breakfast recipe found on “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free e-book published by Dairy AustraliaApple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

Kickstart the day with these refreshing acidic pancakes topped with fresh fruits and a lemon-ricotta cream. With a few cups of Assam this should easily keep you going till lunchtime.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge breakfast_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – TaB

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaB

Tab (stylized as TaB) is a diet cola soft drink produced by The Coca-Cola Company, introduced in 1963. The soda was popular throughout the 1960s and 1970s, and several variations were made, including Tab Clear as well as caffeine-free versions.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaBAs a result of studies in the early 1970s linking saccharin, TaB’s main sweetener, with bladder cancer in rats, the United States Congress mandated warning labels on products containing the sweetener. The label requirement was later repealed when no evidence was found linking saccharin with cancer in humans.

After its introduction in 1982, Diet Coke quickly replaced TaB as the Coca-Cola Company’s most popular diet cola, although TaB still retained a loyal following. Approximately 3 million cases were sold in the United States in 2008

History

TaB was introduced as a diet drink in 1963. TaB was created by Coca-Cola after the successful sales and marketing of Diet Rite cola, owned by The Royal Crown Company; previously, Diet Rite had been the only sugarless soda on the market. Tab was marketed to consumers who wanted to “keep tabs” on their weight.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaB

Coca-Cola’s marketing research department used its IBM 1401 computer to generate a list of over 185,000 four-letter words with one vowel, adding names suggested by the company’s own staff; the list was stripped of any words deemed unpronounceable or too similar to existing trademarks. From a final list of about twenty names, “Tabb” was chosen, influenced by the possible play on words, and shortened to “TaB” during development.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaBPackaging designer Robert Sidney Dickens gave the name the capitalization pattern (“TaB”) used in the logo as well as creating a new bottle design for the soft drink.

TaB has been reformulated several times. It was initially sweetened with cyclamate. After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a ban on cyclamate in 1969, sodium saccharin was used. Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the development of bladder cancer.

As a result, the United States Congress mandated that further studies of saccharin be performed and required that all food containing saccharin bear a label warning that the sweetener had been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals. In the absence of further evidence Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaBthat saccharin caused cancer in humans, the substance was delisted in 2000 from the U.S. National Toxicology Program’s Report on Carcinogens; this led to the repealing of the warning label requirements for products containing saccharin. In December 2010, the United States Environmental Protection Agency removed saccharin from its list of hazardous substances.

At the height of its popularity, the Tab name was briefly extended to other diet soft drinks, including TaB Lemon-Lime, TaB Black Cherry, TaB Ginger Ale, TaB Root Beer and TaB Orange.

Other variants of Tab have appeared over the years

Caffeine Free TaB was introduced in the 1980s with little fanfare and disappeared soon afterward.

In 1992, Coca-Cola released TaB Clear in the U.S., Australia and UK. It was withdrawn after less than a year.

TaB Energy is an energy drink released in early 2006 that uses a different recipe than Tab cola.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - TaB

TaB’s popularity began to decline in 1982 with the introduction of Diet Coke, although TaB retained something of a cult following in the United States, where customers purchased about 3 million cases in 2008. According to the Coca-Cola Company, in 2012 TaB was being sold in the countries of the Southern African Customs Union (Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland), Spain, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the United States.

Text from Wikipedia

Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

A vegetable omelette recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

Omelettes are among the the most versatile dishes there is. You can make one for breakfast, for lunch, as an appetizer, a dessert and even enjoy one as an evening meal. You can fill them with just about anything and use whatever kind of spice or herbs you prefere to suit your taste and eating practices. For instance vegetables and chives like in the one in this post.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge vegetarian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Holiday Stew / Feriegryte

A pork stew recipe in holiday mood found in
“52 Søndagsmiddager”  (52 Sunday Dinners)
published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1983

Holiday Stew / Feriegryte

The easter holiday is getting close and those who haven’t had enough of snow and skiing yet here in Norway head for the mountains. The more sensible of us stay at home and enjoy the budding spring. What ever we choose, labouring over the pots and pans is a thing to avoid when in the holiday mood, so here’s a quick and easy stew for you

Ted
Winking smile
000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Navajo Flatbreads / Flate Navajo Brød

A great camp bread recipe found on jamieoliver.com
Navajo flatbreads_post

Jamie Oliver: “A cross between Indian naan breads and Mexican tortillas, these flatbreads are brilliantly simple.”

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge campfire000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Chakchouka – Spicy Vegetable Mix / Krydret Grønnsakrøre

A spicy vegetable dish from “Lettvint For Små Familier” (Easy For Small Families) published by Hjemmets Bokklubb in 1979
Chakchouka – Spicy Vegetable Mix / Krydret Grønnsakrøre

This tasty dish is the Moroccan reply in Frenc’s well known ratatouille. It is similar to the French dish only better if you let it mature a few days in the refrigerator. The flavours go together making a firework of tastes.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge vegetarian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Boeuf Lyonaise

A classic lunch dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Boeuf Lyonaise

This dish is closely related to the salad Parisienne. Both are based on the same basic ingredients. The biggest difference is that one is a warm meal while the other is a cold one. The dish is excellent to turn to when you have some leftover roast beef or other types of beef.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here

Mini Chicken Pizzas / Mini Kyllingpizzaer

A great mini pizza recipe found on teatimemagazine.comBuffalo Chicken Pizzas_post

Mini pizzas like these are both fun to make and fun to serve. The topping can be varied giving you the chance to bake a lot of different pizzas  in one go. Works great both as a lunch, in the picnic basket and for an afternoon tea.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge afternoon tea_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Bamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

A Thai inspired beef recipe found on baltimoresun.comBamboo Garden’s Thai Crispy Beef / Sprøstekt Thai Biff fra Bamboo Garden

Chef Chen Lin Chang at Bamboo Garden in Bel Air draws inspiration from across Asia. In his crispy beef dish, he focuses on the cuisine of Thailand. Thai food is known for its intense flavors, liberal use of fresh vegetables and — sometimes — extreme heat. Though the dishes often taste complex, they can be fairly simple to replicate at home.

The key to this dish is in the sauce — a sweet, salty, tangy mixture with a spicy twist. The preparation is straightforward, and the recipe is customizable. It works with many different cuts of beef, and the vegetables included (and their quantities) can be adjusted by preference and season. Thai crispy beef is a great way to make use of whatever is growing in your summer garden.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Spicy Bacon and Potato Soup / Krydret Bacon- og Potetsupp

A hot in both meaning of the word soup recipe
found on
allers.no
260_krydret bacon og potetsuppe_post
Nothing is better than a hot soup with spicy flavours on
cold winter days!

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge soup_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker

A vegetable patty recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
published by Gotham Steel

Crispy Sweet Potato Cakes / Sprø Søtpotetkaker
000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge vegetarian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the morning glory family Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. In some parts of the English-speaking world, sweet potatoes are locally known by other imagesnames such as kumara, but people usually confused it with yam due to their similar appearances. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple. Sweet potato cultivars with white or pale yellow flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink or orange flesh.

Ipomoea batatas is native to the tropical regions in the Americas. Of the approximately 50 genera and more than 1,000 species of Convolvulaceae, I. batatas is the only crop plant of major importance—some others are used locally (e.g. I. aquatica “kangkong”), but many are poisonous. The genus Ipomoea that contains the sweet potato also includes several garden flowers called morning glories, though that term is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown as ornamental plants under the name tuberous morning glory, used in a horticultural context.

New York Reuben / New York Reuben Sandwich

A sandwich recipe found in “2012 Australian Grand Dairy Awards Best of the Best Cookbook” published by Dairy Australia
New York Reuben_post000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge snack_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The Reuben sandwich is an American hot sandwich composed of corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Russian dressing, grilled between slices of rye bread. Several variants exist.

Possible origins

Reuben Kulakofsky, Blackstone Hotel, Omaha, Nebraska

The most widely accepted origin holds that Reuben Kulakofsky (his first name sometimes spelled Reubin; his last name sometimes shortened to Kay), a Jewish Lithuanian-born grocer residing in Omaha, Blackstone HotelNebraska, was the inventor, perhaps as part of a group effort by members of Kulakofsky’s weekly poker game held in the Blackstone Hotel from around 1920 through 1935.

The participants, who nicknamed themselves “the committee”, included the hotel’s owner, Charles Schimmel. The sandwich first gained local fame when Schimmel put it on the Blackstone’s lunch menu, and its fame spread when a former employee of the hotel won a national contest with the recipe. In Omaha, March 14 was proclaimed as Reuben Sandwich Day.

Reuben’s Delicatessen: New York City

Reuben's DelicatessenAnother account holds that the Reuben’s creator was Arnold Reuben, the German-Jewish owner of the famed Reuben’s Delicatessen (1908 – 2001) in New York City. According to an interview with Craig Claiborne, Arnold Reuben invented the “Reuben Special” around 1914. The earliest references in print to the sandwich are New York–based, but that is not conclusive evidence, though the fact that the earliest, in a 1926 issue of Theatre Magazine, references a “Reuben Special”, does seem to take its cue from Arnold Reuben’s menu.

Marjorie RambeauA variation of the above account is related by Bernard Sobel in his 1953 book, Broadway Heartbeat: Memoirs of a Press Agent. Sobel states that the sandwich was an extemporaneous creation for Marjorie Rambeau inaugurated when the famed Broadway actress visited the Reuben’s Delicatessen one night when the cupboards were particularly bare.

Some sources name the actress in the above account as Annette Seelos, not Marjorie Rambeau, while also noting that the original “Reuben Special” sandwich of 1926 did not contain corned beef or sauerkraut and was not grilled.

Still other versions give credit to Alfred Scheuing, a chef at Reuben’s Delicatessen, and say he created the sandwich for Reuben’s son, Arnold Jr., in the 1930s.

Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

A great dessert recipe found in “Hershey’s Make it Chocolate!” published by Hershey in 1987Chocolate-Amaretto Ice Cream / Sjokolade og Amaretto Iskrem

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge dessert_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Amaretto (Italian for “a little bitter”) is a sweet, almond-flavoured, Italian liqueur associated with Saronno, Italy. Various commercial brands are made from a base of apricot pits, almonds, or both.

Amaretto serves a variety of culinary uses, can be drunk by itself, and is added to other beverages to create several popular mixed drinks, as well as to coffee and ice cream.

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge soup_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.