Round Crispbread / Runde Knekkebrød

A recipe for Norwegian crispbread found on brodogkorn.no
Round Crispbread / Runde Knekkebrød

These round crispbread are both wholesome, delicious and easy to make with wheat and whole wheat. They are great for breakfast with your favourite spread and keeps you feeling nice and full until lunch.

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Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

A traditional Norvegian lefse recipe found on brodogkorn.no
Potato Lefse / Potetlefse

Potato Lefse is made from boiled potatoes, sour cream, cream, butter and flour, and baked on a griddle. Serve with your dinner, for lutefisk or other traditional Norwegian food like cured meat or bring it on a hike with nice toppings.

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Slab Bread / Hellebrød

A recipe for Stone Age bread gound on nrk.no
headingSlab Bread / Hellebrød

Why not bake your own bread when you’re camping? Baking bread on a slab of stone is bread baking Stone Age style. If you really want to create authentic northern European Stone Age bread replace the wheat grains and wheat flour in the recipe with rye grain and rye flour. The wheat had not come this far north at that time. And skip the salt and taste the bread with wild herbs that would have grown here then, for example, yarrow or nettles.

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The Goat Curry in William Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair” / Geitekarrien i William Thackerays “Forfengelighetens Marked”

A hot curry recipe found on theguardian.comThe goat curry in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair_post

“Give Miss Sharp some curry, my dear,” said Mr. Sedley, laughing. Rebecca had never tasted the dish before. “Do you find it as good as everything else from India?” said Mr. Sedley. “Oh, excellent!” said Rebecca, who was suffering tortures with the cayenne pepper. “Try a chili with it, Miss Sharp,” said Joseph, really interested. “A chili,” said Rebecca, gasping. “Oh yes!” She thought a chili was something cool, as its name imported, and was served with some. “How fresh and green they look,” she said, and put one into her mouth. It was hotter than the curry; flesh and blood could bear it no longer. She laid down her fork. “Water, for Heaven’s sake, water!” she cried.

Fra “Vanity Fair” av William Makepeace Thackeray

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Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato – Calzone with Ham and Apples / Calzone med Skinke og Eple

A calzone from ”Pizza” a book in the “Kjøkkenbiblioteket”  (Kitchen Library) series published by Aventura Forlag in 1992.
Calzone al Prosciutto Cotto Affumicato

This recipe originates from the Alto Adige region in northern Italy. Feel free to substitute ham with other types of pork. But do not cut out horseradish, it brings out a lot of flavor from the meat and apples. One variation is to form the calzone with an open top.

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The History of Lutefisk

An article found on whatscookingamerica.netLutefisk_01

It is said that about half the Norwegians who immigrated to America came in order to escape the hated lutefisk and the other half came to spread the gospel of lutefisk’s wonderfulness.

– Norwegian-American saying

Lutefisk History

Lutefisk (pronounced lewd-uh-fisk) is dried cod that has been soaked in a lye solution for several days to rehydrate it.  It is rinsed with cold water to remove the lye, then boiled or baked, and then served with butter, salt, and pepper.

Lutefisk_02

The finished lutefisk usually is the consistency of Jello.  It is also called lyefish, and in the United States, Norwegian-Americans traditionally serve it for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  In many Norwegian homes, lutefisk takes the place of the Christmas turkey.  In Minnesota and Wisconsin, you can find lutefisk in local food stores and even at some restaurants. It is a food that you either love or hate, and, as some people say, “Once a year is probably enough!”

During the fall in Wisconsin, people watch their local newspapers for announcements of lutefisk suppers, which are usually held in Norwegian churches.  Usually every Norwegian church will host at least one lutefisk supper between October and the end of the year.  The dinners have become so popular that lovers of this special cod dish drive great distances, and these are not just people of Scandinavian descent.

Lutefisk_04

The history of lutefisk dates back to the Vikings.  On one occasion, according to one legend, plundering Vikings burned down a fishing village, including the wooden racks with drying cod.  The returning villagers poured water on the racks to put out the fire.  Ashes covered the dried fish, and then it rained.  The fish buried in the ashes in the ashes thus became soaked in a lye slush.  Later the villagers were surprised to see that the dried fish had changed to what looked like fresh fish.  They rinsed the fish in water to remove the lye and make it edible, and then boiled it.  The story is that one particularly brave villager tasted the fish and declared it “not bad.”

Lutefisk_03

Norwegian-Americans believe that lutefisk was brought by their ancestors on the ships when they came to America, and that it was all they had to eat.  Today the fish is celebrated in ethnic and religious celebrations and is linked with hardship and courage.


In general I love traditional Norwegian food, both the food eaten during celebrating Christmas and the traditional food eaten the year round. Having said as much that love does not embrace lutefisk, but if it is served with enough crispy bacon and mushy peas as it usually is here in Norway I do eat it.

Ted
Winking smile

New Bedford Flounder Roll-Ups / New Bedford Flyndre Rulader

A floudre recipe found in “Seafood ‘n Seaports – a Cook’s Tour of Massachusetts” published by Massachusetts Seafood Council in 1970
New Bedford Flounder Roll-Ups / New Bedford Flyndre Rulader

Flounder is one of my favourite kind of fish. It is great boiled, baked, fried, breaded or filled and rolled up like these – Ted

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Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

A classic soup recipe from “Sunt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Mulligatawny Soup / Mulligatawny-Suppe

Mulligatawny soup is an English soup with origins in the Indian cuisine. The name originates from the Tamil words millagai / milagu and thanni  and can be translated as “pepper-water”.

The recipe for mulligatawny has varied greatly over the years and there is no single original version. Later versions included British modifications that included meat but the local Madras recipe on which it was based most definitely did not. Early references to it in English go back to 1784. In 1827, William Kitchiner, wrote that it had become fashionable in Britain.

By the mid 1800s, “Wyvern”, the pen-name of Arthur Robert Kenney Herbert (1840-1916), wrote in his popular “Culinary Jottings” that “really well-made mulligatunny is a thing of the past.”

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Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

A no-bake chocolate cake recipe found in “The Chocolate Book”
by Valerie Barrett published in 1987

Refrigerator Biscuit Cake / Kjøleskapskjekskake

Sometimes it’s nice to make a cake that needs no baking, just an overnight stay in the refrigerator. This is such a chocolate cake, full of crunchy and sweet goodies.

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Emmenthaler Fish / Emmenthaler-Fisk

A fish dinner recipe found in “Fisk og Skalldyr” (Fish and Shellfish) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980 Emmenthaler-fisk_post

Breaded panfried or deepfried white fish filled with emmenthaler cheese and ham served with potato salad white bread and a fresh salad sounds great to me

Ted
Smile

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Bindae Duk – Korean Mung Pancakes / Koreanske Mungbønnepannekaker

A Korean pancake recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987

bidae duk - koreansk mungbønne-pannekaker_post

Small, crispy fried pancakes made of ground mung beans with diced ham and kim chee is a tasty appetizer served with flavorings such as chilisauce and soy sauce. They can be eaten both hot and cold.

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4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

4 cake recipes found in “Moderne Baking” (Modern Baking)
published by Freia as in 1938 to promote their baking powder

4 Classic Cakes From The Thirties / 4 Klassiske Kaker Fra Tredvetallet

Baking is strange, our breakfast, lunch and dinner habits and menus change a lot from decade to decade, but our favourite cakes recipes hardly ever change. “Moderne Baking” was published 80 years ago and still you could find these four recipes in one version or other in just about any contemporary baking cook book.

Its nice to know there are still some constants in our lives in these times of rapid changes – Ted

Winking smile

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Dining Across America in Rail’s Golden Age

Dining Across America in Rail’s Golden Age

An article from history.com written by Stephanie Butler

Long before supersonic jets made it easy to cross the country, train travel was the elegant way to get from place to place in the United States. During the golden age of American trains, their sleek, opulent interiors featured plush seats, porters for your every need and gleaming dining cars. The dining car was the heart of train life, a place for passengers to relax and enjoy a meal in the company of newfound friends. And the food was, by all accounts, delicious. Far from the reheated, packaged meals of today, train chefs prepared food from scratch, from the turtle soup to the spiced nuts.

Dining Across America in Rail’s Golden Age

The earliest days of train travel, however, were anything but posh. Even on longer hauls, in the 1840s passengers were expected to bring their own food aboard or eat at boarding house restaurants along the line. Often these restaurants were located at “water stops,” so called because, in the days of steam locomotion, trains would have to take on water at regular intervals. Isolated water stops were frequent targets of attack by bandits, so it’s no wonder that rail companies quickly adapted to create sanctuaries on the train where passengers could dine in peace.

Dining Across America in Rail’s Golden Age

By the 1870s, the Transcontinental Railroad stretched all the way to California, and with it came a new era of railway dining. The most detailed account of train foods comes from an article in Harper’s Magazine published in 1872 and written by Charles Nordhoff, a prominent journalist of the era. In his travelogue, aptly titled “California: How to Go There, And What to See by the Way,” Nordhoff spoke of train dining in glowing terms: “The cooking is admirable, the service excellent, and the food is various and abundant.” A passenger could dine on broiled muttonchops, breaded veal cutlets and freshly hunted buffalo, washing it all down with a glass of real French champagne.

On board the Nickel Plate Railroad, which stretched over the mid-central United States, diners could choose the meal and budget that fit them best, from a 55-cent special of sliced tomatoes and baked beans to finnan haddie à la Delmonico (a smoked haddock dish) for 90 cents.

Dining Across America in Rail’s Golden Age

Even though the railways led to California, dining cars were nonexistent west of Omaha until the 1890s. (The high-tech cars were too costly to chance on dangerous, isolated Western rails.) The lack of food options for travelers led to one of the most enduring images of America’s railway golden age: the Harvey Girls. These women worked as waitresses in the Harvey Houses, restaurant-inns that dotted the Western landscape for decades. Fred Harvey opened the first branch of his Harvey House in 1878, and from then until the automobile age in the 20th century, passengers could count on delicious, high-quality food served in beautiful surroundings.

Meals as varied as chicken enchiladas, roast goose with apples and apricot Charlotte were served by the Harvey Girls, clad in long black dresses with voluminous white aprons. Fred Harvey insisted that his serving staff be female, attractive, between the ages of 18 and 30, and, most importantly, unmarried. In return, the staff got free room and board, a generous salary and a one-year employment contract. Often the only young women in rough-and-tumble railroad towns, the Girls were a civilizing force in the Wild West.

Honey and Mustard Sauce / Honning- og Sennepssaus

A medieval spicy sauce recipe found at cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval Monday_headingHoney and Mustard Sauce_post

Mustard was much used by the Romans and later was very popular with the Anglo Saxons. It grew locally and so was cheap. It could be used to makes sauces for meat and fish as well as dressings for salads. It helped to preserve other foods as well as having healthy properties of its own.

The sauces were generally made from a mixture of ground mustard seeds, vinegar, wine and often honey, with spices or other flavourings added according to what people liked.

They could then be stored for several weeks. Mustard’s ‘hotness’ gets less after it is mixed and kept for a few days, which may account for the strength of the sauces often made – which would be much too hot for most of us today.

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Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

A youth party suggestion with menu and recipes found in
“Vi Skal Ha Gjester” (We’re Having Guests)
published by Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag in 1969

Youth Parties Anno 1969 / Ungdomsselskaper Anno 1969

I found working with the last post so entertaining that I just had to do another post from the same book although both are more more work than most posts. Because if you think arranging a party for your young ones would provide less problems than serving crabs to a couple of friends you are absolutely mistaken.

The set of worries maybe different, but the chance of ending with egg on your face was indeed present. And all the worries about what would happen to your furniture and floors came on top of that.


I was sixteen in 1969 and I must admit that the parties I went to back then were home-alone-parties that didn’t have the slightest likeness to the parties described in this book. If not totally Sex Drugs & Rock’n’Roll we were close enough.

Ted
Winking smile

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