Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kinnie

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - KinnieKinnie (Maltese pronunciation: [kinːiː]) is a soft drink from Malta. It was first developed in 1952 by Simonds Farsons Cisk.

Kinnie is amber in colour, has a bittersweet flavour, and is drunk straight or mixed with alcohol to create a long drink.

History

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - KinnieKinnie was first produced in 1952 as an alternative to the cola drinks that proliferated in post-war Europe.

Kinnie’s recipe is kept secret. However the official website provides further information about its ingredients, suggesting that Kinnie owes its bittersweet taste to the blend Maltese Mediterranean chinotto bitter oranges, Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kinniecombined with an infusion from a dozen different aromatic herbs and spices such as anise, ginseng, vanilla, rhubarb and liquorice. Only natural ingredients are used.

As the health awareness increased over recent decades, a Diet version for Kinnie appeared in 1984. In 2007, a new low calorie version of Kinnie called Kinnie Zest was made available. This has a slightly darker colour and a stronger orange flavour, and is advertised as only having one calorie per bottle.

Sales locations

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - KinnieKinnie is exported to Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, The Netherlands, Albania, Libya, Hungary and Canada. Kinnie is also available for direct purchase by consumers in Europe via on-line distribution partners based in Germany and Italy.

In recent years, Simonds Farsons Cisk also started to franchise Kinnie production overseas. As a result, Kinnie is now produced under licence from Farsons in Australia and deals are being struck with partners in Eastern Europe and South Africa.

In March 2009, it was announced that Farsons were going to make Kinnie exports into Russia. In the summer of 2010, Farsons and Kinnie UK Limited soft-launched Kinnie and its two variants in London’s West End, reaching almost 100 trial outlets by September 2010.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kinnie

Bottled Kinnie is now available from amazon.co.uk

Orange Cream Custard / Kremet Appelsinpudding

A dessert recipe found in “Each Taste a Treat –
97 Delicious Recipes”  published by
Borden’s Condenced Milk Company in 1929

Orange Cream Custard / Kremet Appelsinpudding

Another dessert based on oranges for you here, way back from
the roaring twenties this time- Ted

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Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

A fresh take on the club sandwich found in
“Torsk til Hverdag  og Fest” (Cod for Everydays and Parties)
a free E-book published by
Godfisk!
Club Sandwich with Cod / Club Sandwich med Torsk

Cod is perfect for everyday life when time is scarce, the family is hungry and you need a healthy, quick and tasty dinner.

But cod is also great as party food. Put cod on the table when family or friends get together for a nice meal and a good mood is guaranteed. With its firm white fish meat and its delicate flavor, the cod fits just perfectly both for everydays and parties.

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The History of Fish and Chips

An article By Ellen Castelow, Contributing Writer at The National Federation of Fish Friers posted on Historic UK

The History of Fish and Chips

Ahh…. Fish, chips and mushy peas! There is nothing more British than fish and chips. Freshly cooked, piping hot fish and chips, smothered in salt and soused with vinegar, wrapped in newspaper and eaten out-of-doors on a cold and wintry day – it simply cannot be beaten!

So how, when and where did this quintessentially British dish come about?

The potato is thought to have been brought to England from the New World in the 17th century by Sir Walter Raleigh although it is believed that the French invented the fried potato chip.

Both Lancashire and London stake a claim to being the first to invent this famous meal – chips were a cheap, staple food of the industrial The History of Fish and Chipsnorth whilst fried fish was introduced in London’s East End. In 1839 Charles Dickens referred to a “fried fish warehouse” in his novel, ‘Oliver Twist’.

The populace soon decided that putting fried fish and chips together was a very tasty combination and so was born their national dish of fish and chips!

The first fish and chip shop in the North of England is thought to have opened in Mossely, near Oldham, Lancashire, around 1863. Mr Lees sold fish and chips from a wooden hut in the market and later he transferred the business to a permanent shop across the road which had the following inscription in the window, “This is the first fish and chip shop in the world”.

However in London, it is said that Joseph Malin opened a fish and chip shop in Cleveland Street within the sound of Bow Bells in 1860.

Fish and chip shops were originally small family businesses, often run from the ‘front room’ of the house and were commonplace by the late 19th century.

The History of Fish and Chips

Through the latter part of the 19th century and well into the 20th century, the fish and chip trade expanded greatly to satisfy the needs of the growing industrial population of Great Britain. In fact you might say that the Industrial Revolution was fuelled partly by fish and chips!

The development of the steam trawler brought fish from all over the North Atlantic, Iceland and Greenland and the steam railways allowed easy and fast distribution of the fish around the country.

Fish and chips became so essential to the diet of the ordinary man and woman that one shop in Bradford had to employ a doorman to control the queue at busy times during 1931. The Territorial Army prepared for battle on fish and chips provided in special catering tents erected at training camps in the 1930’s.

The fish and chip shop was invaluable in supplementing the family’s weekly diet in the Second World War, as fish and chips were among the few foods not to be rationed. Queues were often hours long when the word went round that the chip shop had fish!! On one occasion at Brian’s Fish and Chip Shop in Leeds, when fish was scarce, homemade fish cakes were sold – along with the confusing, and slightly worrying, warning: “Patrons: We do not recommend the use of vinegar with these fish cakes”!!

The History of Fish and Chips

So are fish and chips any good for us, nutritionally? Fish and chips are a valuable source of protein, fibre, iron and vitamins, providing a third of the recommended daily allowance of vitamins for men and nearly half for women. Magnus Pyke cites it as an example of a traditional dish once jeered at by food snobs and even censured by health food devotees but now fully appreciated as a nutritious combination.

In 1999, the British consumed nearly 300 million servings of fish and chips* – that equates to six servings for every man, woman and child in the country. There are now around 8,500 fish and chip shops* across the UK – that’s eight for every one McDonald’s outlet, making British Fish and Chips the nation’s favourite take-away.

Hungrytime Outdoors from 1940 in PDF

Hungrytime Outdoors from 1940 in PDF

HUNGRYTIME OUTDOORS

by Bill Kraus

Explorer – Scout Commissioner – Creve
Coeur Council. Member of Adventurers’
Club in Chicago

From the book intro: You can use it at home . . . for trips . . . for the family and friends. It is a valuable meal planner for that organization that counts on you for leadership in FUN and in GOOD EATING, which make for good health and snappy program. Keep this book always handy – ready to plan keen adventures in eating. Pass it on to friends that need help in planning picnics, trips, hikes, outings, and all the other excuses for GOOD EATING. They say when you eat outdoors . . . “everything you eat goes to your stomach . . .”

The book was published by
American National Dairy Council
in 1940


This gem of camping and hiking cook book full of
recipes  and outdoor tips can be yours for free
just by clicking the icon below

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Chicken Rolls Special / Kyllingrulade Spesial

A delicious lunch recipe found in “Crisco’s Good Cooking
Made Easy Cook Book” published by Procter & Gamble in 1978
Chicken Rolls Special / Kyllingrulade Spesial

Crisco is a brand of shortening produced by The J.M. Smucker Company popular in the United States. Introduced in June 1911 by Procter & Gamble, it was the first shortening to be made entirely of vegetable oil. Additional products marketed by Smucker under the Crisco brand include a cooking spray, various olive oils, and other cooking oils, including canola, corn, peanut, olive, sunflower, vegetable and blended oils

If you’re living outside the US you can get hold of Crisco
at
My American Market if you want to try it in a typical
American recipe
Ted

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Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

An orange flavoured dessert recipe found in
“150 New Ways to Serve Ice Cream”
published by  Sealtest System Laboratories Inc in 1936

Orange Glory / Appelsin Herligheter

The old fashioned “dowdy” that our grandmothers used to serve was a simple bread and fruit pudding. Many of us still have tantalizing memories of it. This 1930s version comes to us in a new guise.

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Traditional Norwegian Sodd / Tradisjonell Sodd

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe found on spar.noTraditional Norwegian Sodd / Tradisjonell Sodd

Lamb meat cooked with fresh autumn vegetables is traditional food that tastes great. Sodd is considered both everyday and party food and is really suitable for both!

Sodd is not really a soup in the usual meaning of the word but more an intermediate between soups and a light casseroles. But who cares, the dish tastes absolutely amazing –Ted

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Banana Walnut Cake / Banan- og Valnøttkake

A baking recipe found in “To Win New Cooking Fame –
Just Add Waluts” published by Diamond Brand Walnuts in 1937

Banana Walnut Cake / Banan- og Valnøttkake

Bananas and walnuts is a wicked combo as Jamie Oliver would
have said had he lived back then. And he would have been right
of course – Ted

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Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

A vegetarian starter recipe found in “Knudsen Recipes For Greater Food Value” published by Knudsen Creamery Co in 1957Stuffed Iceberg Lettuce / Fylt Isbergsalat

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In Context

Iceberg lettuce is one of the main constituents in salads and is known for its crunchy texture. It has comparatively less nutrients than the other greens that you may find in salads.

Nutritional Facts
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of potassium and manganese, as well as a very good source of iron, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous. It also contains traces of sodium, copper, and zinc.

Vitamin Content
Iceberg lettuce is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin K, and vitamin C. It is also a good source of thiamin, vitamin B6, and folate (vitamin B9).

Caloric Content
Iceberg lettuce contains 14 calories per 100 grams. It mainly contains water and dietary fiber. This food is low in sodium and is also very low in saturated fat and cholesterol.

Weight Loss
Iceberg lettuce has a high water content and is very low in calories. Therefore, it is good for weight loss efforts.

Promotes Good Health
It is rich in vitamin A which is an essential vitamin required for healthy eyes, growth and development of bones and strengthening of immune system.

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

An article posted by Nina Martyris a literary journalist based in Knoxville, Tenn. on The Salt on npr.org in February  2016

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea BreaksNews that British tea-drinking is on the decline is stirring a tempest in a teapot across the pond. But U.K. leaders might have welcomed such headlines in the 1970s, when the length of the tea break became a major point of political contention.

So recounts Charles Moore’s acclaimed new biography, Margaret Thatcher, which describes the British prime minister’s “titanic struggle” against the trade unions — a victory for which she was praised and reviled in equal measure.

During the ’70s, as hundreds of labor strikes hobbled the British economy, public frustration with trade unions was summed up in two words: tea break.

Tea breaks, went the popular complaint, had brought the country to its knees.

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

Tea drinking in the U.K. was and is a sacred institution that cuts across the class divide. But with the sharp rise in what were called “wildcat strikes” over the length of the tea break, the custom became a contentious symbol of trade union truculence.

Even Thatcher’s bitter political rival, Jacques Delors, the then-president of the European Commission, admitted to Moore: “She demonstrated a sort of revolt against the old British system with their tea breaks. I had respect for that.”

Americans who lived or worked in England remember being baffled by the rigor with which teatime was observed.

When writer and self-confessed “baseball fanatic” Jeff Archer spent his honeymoon in England in 1973, he ended up playing a friendly match for a local team in Croydon, a London borough. Since it was a freezing day, Archer kept his jacket on to keep his arm loose until it was his turn to pitch. “I stepped on the rubber for my windup,” he recounted to me, “but there was no umpire. I looked at the backstop and saw him drinking tea with a mate. I’d never seen anything like this before in baseball. I hollered, ‘Hey, Ump, let’s get going. My arm’s going to stiffen up.’ He looked at me, and then began talking to his comrade. I ran to the bench and put on my jacket. About five minutes later, he finished his tea and went behind the plate. I took off my jacket and the game resumed.”

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

Archer was no doubt unfamiliar with “Everything Stops for Tea,” a song popular in Britain during the 1930s and ’40s:

Oh, they may be playing football
And the crowd is yelling, “Kill the referee!”
But no matter what the score, when the clock strikes four
Everything stops for tea

Another American who got a tough taste of tea breaks was a thin, young director on the verge of a nervous breakdown: George Lucas.

In the summer of 1976, Lucas was shooting the first Star Wars in England’s EMI-Elstree Studios, chosen for its enormous empty studio space. He had a hellish time, writes J.W. Rinzler in The Making Of Star Wars. The English crew had little respect either for Lucas or his peculiar film involving light sabers that kept breaking. And while Lucas admired the crew’s technical skills, he was bewildered by their work habits. Work began at 8:30 a.m., stopped for an hourlong lunch and two tea breaks at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., and ended at 5:30 p.m. sharp, after which the crew promptly went to the pub. When it was break time, filming would stop dead, even if things happened to be mid-scene.

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

his led to a very funny incident during the 1982 filming of Return of the Jedi, when Lucas returned to EMI. It involved actor Harrison Ford, a loudspeaker and Salacious B. Crumb — known to film fans as a lackey of the evil Jabba the Hutt.

Tim Rose, the puppeteer behind the Crumb character, recalls that during one tea break, the sound man left for tea but forgot to turn off Rose’s microphone. Unaware of this, Rose, who was stationed below the set, with his arm stuck up though a hole in the floor to operate his puppet, said in Crumb’s cackling voice, “The take went well, but this Harrison guy, is he going to talk during our laugh? Because it’s really putting me off.” As his words boomed over the speaker, everyone began to laugh — except for Ford, who stormed off and refused to return until “the asshole who said that was fired.”

Rose wasn’t fired, though Ford was told he was.

The tea break is inextricably intertwined with Britain’s industrial history. Beginning in the 1780s, workers (including children) clocked grueling shifts alongside inexhaustible machinery — and drank sugary tea as a stimulant to keep going.

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

“Cheap, convenient and energizing, tea seemed ideally suited to the short work breaks of 19th-century machine culture,” says Tamara Ketabgian, a professor of English at Beloit College and author of The Lives of Machines. “Rather than weak beer, workers began to drink tea.”

Ketabgian points out that the more paternalistic factory owners, who were interested in their workers’ health, opened canteens and charged a discounted sum for tea and food.

Over the years, workers used the power of collective bargaining to wrest better working conditions — including tea breaks, paid holidays, medical care and fairer wages — from reluctant factory owners. Indeed, in Moore’s biography, a Labour Party leader accuses Margaret Thatcher of having the vices of a Victorian mill owner.

When Britain Fought Against The Tyranny Of Tea Breaks

But the Britain of the 1970s had been battered by one tea break strike too many. Public frustration was never better expressed than by the eternally enraged Basil Fawlty, from the era’s beloved BBC comedy Fawlty Towers, about a hotel where things don’t work. In one episode that captured the national mood, Basil rants against the workers of the nationally owned Leyland Motors:

“Another car strike. Marvelous, isn’t it? The taxpayers pay them millions each year so they can go on strike. It’s called socialism. I mean, if they don’t like cars, why don’t they get themselves another bloody job designing cathedrals or composing violin concertos? The British Leyland Concerto in four movements, all of ’em slow, with a four-hour tea-break in between.”

But in the midst of dysfunction, there was a ray of hope.

As Larry Elliott and Dan Atkinson write in The Age of Insecurity, which examines the economic history of postwar Britain, the only person who seemed capable of getting the hotel to work was Basil’s “Gorgon of a wife,” Sybil. “Like another woman coming to prominence in the 1970s,” they write, “she was middle-aged, blonde, shrill, philistine and utterly ruthless.”

The Century Cook Book & Family Medical Adviser from 1893 in PDF

The Century Cook Book & Family Medical Adviser from 1893 in PDF

The Century Cook Book
& Family Medical Adviser

by
Jennie A Hansey

In preparing this book for the public our object has been to fill a long-felt want, namely a book to which perplexed and inexperienced housekeepers can go and be sure that they will find therein something to tide them over the emergencies that occur in every household. In compiling the recipes for cooking we have aimed at simplicity and practicability, avoiding, as far as possible, all foreign and ambiguous terms; claiming that, as a rule, American names are good and explicit enough for American cooking.

Laird & Lee Publishers
1893


This 400 page cook book with more than 300 illustrations
can be yours for free simply by ckicking the icon below

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NOTE! The pdf does not open with the cover on the picture
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Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

A tasty scones recipe found on oetker.no
Scones with Vanilla and Maple Syrup Butter / Scones med Vanilje- og Lønnesirupsmør

These scones are plain, meaning without added fruit, but they are light, airy and have just the right amount of crusty surface that makes them the perfect backdrop for the vanilla and maple syrup butter.

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Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

A classic Norwegian bun recipe found on tine.no
Butter Buns with Vanilla Cream and Berries / Smørboller med Vaniljekrem og Bær

Nothing tastes better than fresh yeast bakery. It does not have to be a special occasion, these buns can be enjoyed fresh any day or you can freeze them and serve them should you get unexpected guests. You get about 20 buns from this recipe.

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Belgian Mussels and French Fries / Belgiske Blåskjell og Pommes Frites

A classic Belgian bistro dish found on joker.no
Belgian Mussels and French Fries / Belgiske Blåskjell og Pommes Frites

Moules Frites is charming Belgian bistro food. It can also be a fun family meal where anything can be eaten with your fingers! Follow this recipe to make delicious Belgian-style mussels with deep fried potato wedges and if you want to make it completely Belgian, mayonnaise as a dip for the potato wedges.

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