Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

En classic Victorian recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmagundy / Salmagundy Salat

Salmagundy is essentially the same recipe as the georgian ‘salamongundy’, however as food fashions moved on the dish became a small, delicate individual salad and was served as part of afternoon tea, rather than as a whole dish at a main meal.

The whole dish is made in a tiny tea cup and turned out onto the saucer as a single portion salad. The Victorians and Edwardians made afternoon tea very fashionable. Scones and teabreads, little cakes and cucumber sandwiches all had their place at these elaborate teas.

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19th century Newport Lady Cakes / 1800talls Newport Lady Kaker

A spicy 19th century tea cake recipe found on
A Taste of History with Joyce White
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Joyce White who runs A Taste of History with Joyce White writes: This recipe is one in a collection of 19th century recipes I found at the Maryland Historical Society.  It is a light and moist cake that is lightly scented with nutmeg. Perfect with your favorite cup of tea!

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18th Century Ship’s Bisket / 1800talls Skipskjeks

Authentic ships bisket recipe found on savouringthepast.net
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Jas Townsend who runs savouringthepast.net writes: This Ship’s Bisket is known by many names. Most of the time it was called just bisket, sometimes it was called hard bisket or brown bisket, sea bisket and ship’s bread. Now many today might want to call it hard tack, but hard tack is really a 19th century term that was popularized during the American civil war.

These 18th century biskets are not like today’s buttery flaky version that we serve along with sausage gravy for breakfast. These biskets were not made to be enjoyed; they were made out of necessity.

sailors eating

Ship’s captains faced a continual challenge of having enough food on board to feed a large crew for a long journey. Food spoilage was really his greatest concern. Fresh bread rapidly became moldy on long trips and stored flour would go rancid and bug ridden, so hard bisket was really born out of necessity.

It was a means of food preservation. If it was prepared and stored properly it would last for a year or more. In addition to preservation, the bisket form also helped in portability and in dividing the rations when it came time. Soldiers and sailors typically got one pound of bread a day and biskets were usually about four ounces so when it came time to distribute them, each sailor or soldier would get four biskets.

Biskets from London were considered to be the highest quality. They were the most resistant to mold and insects. They were really the standard by which all the other bisket maker’s aspired to, but not all biskets were the same quality.

Retro Raspberry Lime Rickeys / Retro Bringebær og Lime Rickeys

A retro drink enjoying renewed interest found on food52.com
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The Rickey is a highball drink made from gin or bourbon, half of a lime squeezed and dropped in the glass, and carbonated water. Little or no sugar is added to the rickey. Originally created with bourbon in Washington, D.C. at Shoomaker’s bar by bartender George A. Williamson in the 1880s, purportedly in collaboration with Democratic lobbyist Colonel Joe Rickey, it became a worldwide sensation when mixed with gin a decade later.

A recipe for the rickey appears as early as Daly’s Bartenders’ Encyclopedia (1903, p. 57) by Tim Daly:

GIN RICKEY. Use a sour glass. Squeeze the juice of one lime into it. 1 small lump of ice. 1 wine glass of Plymouth gin. Fill the glass with syphon seltzer, and serve with small bar spoon.

This rickey on the other hand is alcohol free:

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1872 Fruitcake / 1872 Fruktkake

A cake recipe inspired by a book by Philip Pullman
found on theguardian.com
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Lunch, in their Bohemian household, consisted of a jug of ale, the remains of a large joint of roast beef, a fruit cake and a bag of apples, which Rosa said she had been given the night before by one of her admirers, a porter in Covent Garden market. They ate it, with the help of one large pocket knife and their fingers.
– From “The Ruby in the Smoke” by Philip Pullman

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1840 Farm Pancakes / 1840 Gårdspannekaker

An 18th century recipe found on food52.com
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In Context: The Ancient Greeks made pancakes called τηγανίτης (tēganitēs), ταγηνίτης (tagēnitēs) or ταγηνίας (tagēnias), all words deriving from τάγηνον (tagēnon), “frying pan”. The earliest attested references on tagenias are in the works of the 5th century BC poets Cratinus and Magnes. Tagenites were made with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk, and were served for breakfast. Another kind of pancake was σταιτίτης (staititēs), from σταίτινος (staitinos), “of flour or dough of spelt”, derived from σταῖς (stais), “flour of spelt”. Athenaeus mentions, in his Deipnosophistae, staititas topped with honey, sesame, and cheese. The Middle English word Pancake appears in English in the 15th century.

The Ancient Romans called their fried concoctions “alia dulcia,” which was Latin for “other sweets”. These were much different from what are known as pancakes today.

Text from Wikipedia

French Toast – A Historic View / Arme Riddere – En Historisk Oversikt

A historic overview and a recipe found on savoringthepast.netFrench Toast - A Historig View_post

Jas. Townsend & Son who runs savoringthepast.net writes: Welcome to our blog, SavoringthePast.net. The purpose of this blog is to open dialog with readers and to share insights regarding the history of food.

Food is a universal connection between people of differing cultures, locations, and ages. It’s easy to take for granted the foods we regularly enjoy, giving little thought to the origins of our favorite dishes or how they may have impacted history or evolved over time. The dinner table has always been a place for friends to gather to exchange ideas and engage in dialog ever since…well…ever since there were dinner tables.

If you are at all interested in food history, old recipes and old cooking methods this is not a blog you would want to miss – Ted

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