Norwegian Blackthorn Liqueur / Slåpetornlikør

A classic liqeuer recipe found on norsktradisjonsmat.noNorwegian Blackthorn Liqueur / Slåpetornlikør

A lovely liqueur made by many for Christmas in Norway. This recipe was submitted by May Britt Bischof from Onsøy Associated Country Women. She writes that this is an old recipe from Onsøy, which is taken from the book “Drink from Østfold”, published by Østfold Associated Country Women.

The same recipe can be used with other types of berries such as blueberries, rowanberries, red currants and black currants – Ted

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Hardanger Type of Gløgg / Hardanger-Gløgg

A gløgg variation from Hardanger in Western Norway
found on  tine.no

Hardanger Type of Gløgg / Hardanger-Gløgg

The apple juice from Hardanger is looked upon as almost as nobel as wine in Norway, and it makes a marvelous Christmas gløgg.

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Mint Limeade / Myntelimonade

A limonade recipe found on food52.com
Mint Limeade / Myntelimonade

Tart and refreshing, this limeade is a perfect drink for getting into the spirit of spring. The mint syrup is intensely flavored, so you don’t need much, it makes for an invigorating (and highly quaffable) drink. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, just add a little more of the mint syrup. Simple and lovely in its pure form, this recipe would make a great jumping off point for all sorts of riffs. If you’re so inclined, try adding a splash of vodka, or even light rum.

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Summer Bowl / Sommerbowl

A recipe for a refreshing summer drink found in “Festmat”
(Party Food) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1982

Summer Bowl / Sommerbowl

Summer is not over yet so there is still time for a picnic or two or a party in the garden. This bowl fits perfectly with both. For a picnic it can pay off to fix the ingredients at home and mix the bowl when you’re on the picnic spot – Ted

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Cafe Royal

A downright decadent hot drink recipe found in
“Whitman’s Chocolate Cookbook” published by
Whitman’s Chocolates Division, Pet Inc in 1987

Cafe Royal

When the list of ingredients for making this hot chocolate drink runs
down to 11 items one quickly realize that here we’re not talking about
a couple of spoons instant cocoa tirred into hot milk – Ted

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Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

A grownup picnic refershment found on BBC food
Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

This delicately coloured, refreshing take on the classic gin and tonic makes a perfect picnic tipple.

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The Surprising History of Punch

An article  by Stephanie Butler found on Hungry History

The Surprising History of Punch

The Surprising History of PunchIt’s the chosen summer drink of thousands of thirsty kids every day, and the chosen rum-based tipple of Charles Dickens himself. You’ll find it in tiny boxes, straws included, or in an overflowing bowl heaped with green sherbet at a retro ladies’ luncheon. The beverage, of course, is punch, and it’s come a long way since British sailors first concocted it in the 17th century. Let’s take a look at the history of punch from rum-filled grog to Hawaiian.

The Surprising History of PunchThough it’s mainly known as a non-alcoholic beverage today, punch was invented as a beer alternative in the 17th century by men working the ships for the British East India Company. These men were accomplished drinkers, throwing back an allotment of 10 pints of beer per shipman per day. But when the ships reached the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean, the beer held in cargo bays grew rancid and flat. Once the boats reached the shore, sailors created new drinks out of the ingredients indigenous to their destinations: rum, citrus and spices.

The sailors brought punch back to Britain and soon the drink became a party staple, spreading even as far as the American colonies. Massive punch bowls were ubiquitous at gatherings in the summer months: the founding fathers drank 76 of them at the celebration following the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It’s around this time that the first mention of non-alcoholic punches appears, specifically made for ladies and children.

The Surprising History of PunchBy the Victorian Age, those teetotalling punches ruled the day. Queen Victoria disapproved of strong drink, so alcoholic punches gradually fell out of favor. Frothy egg white-based and sherbet versions grew popular, and continued to be served to ladies who lunched until the 1950s. By that time, cocktail culture was in full effect, and it was socially acceptable for women to drink in public. Punch was relegated to the footnotes of history, only to be resurrected in the 2000s by mustachioed mixologists in cities like New York and San Francisco.

The Surprising History of Punch

The History of Babycham

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The name has always been misleading – the ‘cham’ part leads many people to assume that the bubbly liquid they are happily quaffing at parties is champagne, when in fact this popular drink is actually perry; alcoholic sparkling pear juice. This confusion actually led to a more babycham_06serious altercation between the Babycham Company and the gourmand Raymond Postgate. The founder of the Good Food Guide, a once-a-year publication dedicated to searching out the best eateries in the UK, wrote an article in a 1965 edition of Holiday magazine claiming that his readers should know that Babycham looks and is served like champagne, but is actually a pear- based drink. Babycham sued Postgate for libel, stating that he had inferred that the company were trying to pass the drink off as something it wasn’t. Whilst the judge assigned to the case agreed that the wording was derogatory it was agreed that it could be passed as ‘fair comment’ and Postgate walked from court with no punishment.

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Largely remembered as a popular 1970s and 80’s drink, Babycham actually hit our shelves and bars in 1953 and had the honour of being the first booze to get a commercial aired on UK television. It almost single-handedly changed UK drinking culture by marketing itself directly at women, targeting them with their first specific ‘ladies’’ drink. Its history actually starts back in the 1940s, however.  

babycham_07Shepton Mallet in Somerset was home to the brewery belonging to the Showering brothers (I promise there will be no jokes about how clean they must have been), Francis, Ralph, Herbert and Arthur. Alongside the normal beer they also produced mineral water and cider and Francis spent time searching for new drinks to bring to the market. He looked into the fermentation of fruit juice, originally to improve upon their cider-making process but as he researched the topic he discovered that he could also make a great tasting beverage from perry pears.

After trying it out in the Bristol area as a test at first, their new alcoholic drink was bottled in 1950. It began its life in large bottles but was later swapped into the familiar small (‘baby’) ones that became its trademark.  It was first sent out under the name of Champagne de la Poire but after winning first prize in every important agricultural show in the country people started referring to it as the ‘Baby Champ’. (See where they went from there?)

babycham_05The Showerings had hit upon a real gap in the market. Up until then the drinks aimed towards women were few; stout, port and lemon, gin or sherry perhaps? Showering’s new sparkling perry was an ideal creation to fill that gap. It could be marketed as a light, fun drink specifically for females – and the cute little deer logo, which appeared on the bottles for its launch in the UK in 1953, just added to that appeal.

In 1957 it made its television commercial debut. It was an example of a truly aspirational brand; its strapline was ‘The genuine Champagne Perry’ and it was shown being drunk in saucer style champagne glasses by stylish and alluring women. The commercial was a success and Babycham’s popularity soared. The little Shepton Mallet brewery had to rapidly expand to keep up with increased demand; the campaign to introduce pear perry to a new (and obviously enthusiastic) audience had worked.

The decades rolled by and the success story continued. The drink and the deer became world famous and the ‘Babycham Babe’ beauty competition was launched in the 1960s. The adverts gained a guest appearance from Patrick Mower (Emmerdale) in the 1970s and further references to the ultimate in cool lifestyles (‘Hey, I’d love a Babycham!’) in the 1980s. Later on the image of the deer was turned into a cartoon; it became a party deer, able to bring a bit of pizzazz to the dullest of social gatherings.

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By the 1990s though, the brand was losing ground. By now there were plenty of other cheap and ‘fun’ alcoholic brands on offer and a restriction on television alcohol advertising made it harder for the company to retain their status within the market. In 1993 the brand relaunched, aiming to target a more youthful consumer and a few years later there was a, possibly misguided, attempt to bring the ‘Babycham Babe’ contest back to life. babycham_08(A West End final crowned model Nell McAndrew the winner in case you were curious.)

The millennium saw a new ‘Popping Cork’ bottle added to the brand.

Dogged determination meant that the name survived, and even began gaining in popularity again. The sudden fashion for retro enabled Babycham to become stylish again – even having a regular night held in its honour at Browns’ nightclub in Covent Garden, London.

A range of clothing was launched in 2001; people could now celebrate their love of fizzy perry pear by wearing underwear, outer clothing and accessories adorned by the blue bow-wearing deer.  These caught the eye of the fashion press and Babycham found itself receiving some positive media attention.  A new range of shoes and matching bags came along in 2011.

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In 2003 Babycham celebrated 50 years of bubbly pear goodness and also began sponsoring the Funny Women Comedy Awards and ten years later Diamond Anniversary commemorative Babycham glasses could be snapped up with their special pack promotion.

By 2011 Babycham was selling around 15 million bottles a year and two new flavours have been introduced, with an emphasis on its 1950’s heritage: ‘hint of cream soda’ and ‘hint of cherry soda’. Yum.

Text from doyouremember.co.uk


When I went to England as a young man back in the very early seventies all decent girls drank Babycham. The ones I dated drank vodka straight or gallons of bitter

Ted
Winking smile

Apple, Vodka and Ginger Beer Cocktail / Eple, Vodka og Ingefærøl Cocktail

A refreshing cocktail recipe, family friendly to taste
found on
Tesco Real Food
Apple, Vodka and Ginger Beer Cocktail / Eple, Vodka og Ingefærøl Cocktail

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Homemade Irish Cream / Hjemmelaget Irish Cream

A recipe for a bit of the strong stuff found on BBCfood
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Homemade Irish cream is a real treat, served it chilled with plenty of ice or sneak a drop or two into your coffee.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 25

The Christmas Recipes – Part 25

Glöggmartini / Mulled Wine Martini

Glöggmartini / Mulled Wine Martini

Glazier’s Herring / Glassmestersild

Glazier’s Herring / Glassmestersild

Sloe Gin /Slåpegin

A classic flavoured gin recipe found on historyextra.comSloe Gin /Slåpegin

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates sloe gin – a fruit-flavoured drink made with the bounty of wild blackthorns.

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The Christmas Recipes – Part 7

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Danish Cardinal Punch / Dansk Kardinalpunch
Danish Cardinal Punch / Dansk Kardinalpunch

Grapefruit In Brandy / Grapefrukt I Konjakk
Grapefruit In Brandy / Grapefrukt I Konjakk

Cured Beef / Gravet Oksekjøtt
Cured Beef / Gravet Oksekjøtt

Martha Washington’s “Excellent Cherry Bounce” / Martha Washingtons "Utmerkede Kirsebær Bounce"

A historic cherry liqueur recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
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The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Bounce is made from sour cherries, sugar, and liquor such as brandy, rum, or whiskey. Martha’s recipe, which was found in her papers although not in her handwriting, called for brandy. This drink was one of George’s favorites. He even took it along on journeys — on a trip west in 1784, in search of a commercial waterway from the Atlantic to the Mississippi Valley, he packed canteens of Madeira, port, and bounce.

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Swedish Port Wine Punch / Svensk Portvinspunch

A classic punch recipe found in “MENU – Internationalt Madleksikon” (MENU – International Food Encyclopedia) published by Lademann in 1976
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I don’t know about you, but around my neck of the woods it’s getting rather cold. Autumn is creeping steadily towards winter and hot beverages, with or without alcohol are certainy the order of the day. This Swedish punch is usually served during Christmas, but don’t let that stop you from making a batch right now. You can always make more for Christmas – Ted  😉

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