Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A delicious dessert recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in in 1980
Soufflé au Grand Marnier – Liqueur Soufflé / Likørsoufflé

A soufflé (French: [su.fle]) is a baked egg-based dish originating from the early eighteenth century France. It is made with egg yolks and whipped egg white combined with various other ingredients and served as a tasty main course or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé comes from the French verb souffler which means ‘to breath’ or ‘to puff’.

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Tourte aux Poires – Pear Tart / Pæreterte

A classic  tart recipe found in “Fransk Bondekost”
(French Farmhouse Cooking) published by 
Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1980

Tourte aux Poires – Pear Tart / Pæreterte

I guess we’ve all baked apple tarts and pies so why not try this French farmhouse recipe with pears for a  change.

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Traditional Norwegian Pea Soup / Tradisjonell Ertesuppe

A traditional Norwegian dinner recipe from matprat.no162_ertesuppe_post_thumb[2]

Traditional pea soup cooked on a pork knuckle is nice, solid, Norwegian country fare suitable year round for both casual and formal occasions. Traditionally always served with pancakes with blueberry jam for dessert.

Of all the different traditional dishes I grew up with (both my parents’ families came from the countryside), this is one of my absolute favourites – Ted

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds TuesdayTuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Pork And “Duppe“ / Flesk Og Duppe

A traditional dish (the recipe though modified to fit my mother’s) found on klikk.no

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This is one of the truly immortal Norwegian classics. “Duppe” means white sauce – with drippings. Roasted pork and “Duppe” has always been a much loved part of the Norwegian dinning table and the old “dark”pubs in Oslo has taken on the job of keeping life in this classic and anyone visiting the city should give it a try.

Pork And “Duppe“ has a long tradition in Norway. On the farms, it was common to put the meat in a salt barrel (in a brine of water and salt). It kept the meat for a long, long time. Because pork was particularly well suited for salting it usually ended in the salt barrels. Thus, one had a supply of salt pork almost year round – for those who could afford it, of course.

In context:
It’s called Løyten “Duppe” if you fry some finely chopped shallots and add to the white sauce. If you add finely chopped chives it’s called Tjøme “Duppe”

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See this and other delicious recipes on:
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Forest Stew / Skogsgryte

A recipe from Opplysningskontoret for egg og kjøtt (The Norwegian Information Office for Egg and Meat) Photo: Mari Svenningsen found on dinmat.no

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traditional badge2This is an old hit, a rich stew with lots of flavour. A perfect dinner that you can prepare the day before and just heat up the next.

Norwegians living on the countryside have made ​​variations of this stew for several hundred years. During hunting season the beef was often replaced with moose or other big game. Mushrooms from the woods around the farm and homemade jellies or berry syrups give this dish its distinctive flavour.

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See this and other delicious recipes on:
Tickle My Tastebuds TuesdayTuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday