Fluffy Fruit Pie / Luftig Frukt Pai

A pie recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936fresh fruit pie_post

Evaporated milk seems to have been the chosen substitute for cream in the US most of the last century. As far as I know we have only one type here in Norway an it is aproparately enough called Vikingmelk – Ted

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Cottage Cheese Apple Pie – Eple Pai Med Cottage Cheese

A recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” (Deilige Retter Med Meieri Produkter) published  in 1936

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Since my English speaking visitors gets the benefit of having the Norwegian recipes translated I found that the right thing to do was to let my Norwegian speaking visitors get the benefit of having the English recipes translated to Norwegian. A little more work, but so what – Ted 🙂

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Chicken Maryland

A recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936
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Luncheon Omelet

A recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936
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Hot Oyster Stew

A recipe from “Delicious Dairy Dishes” published in 1936
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In context:
The word oyster is used as a common name for a number of distinct groups of bivalve molluscs that live in marine or brackish habitats. The valves are highly calcified.

Some kinds of oysters are commonly consumed, cooked or raw, by humans as a delicacy. Other kinds, such as pearl oysters, generally not eaten by humans, are harvested for the pearl produced within the mantle.

First attested in English during the 14th century, the word "oyster" comes from Old French oistre, in turn from Latin ostrea, the feminine form of ostreum, which is the latinisation of the Greek ὄστρεον (ostreon), "oyster". Compare ὀστέον (osteon), "bone".
Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia