Apple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

A fresh acidic breakfast recipe found on “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free e-book published by Dairy AustraliaApple, Lemon and Ricotta Pancakes / Eple, Sitron og Ricotta Pannekaker

Kickstart the day with these refreshing acidic pancakes topped with fresh fruits and a lemon-ricotta cream. With a few cups of Assam this should easily keep you going till lunchtime.

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Kinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

A popular Lebanese breakfast dish fould on sbs.com.auKinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

Kinafa is a traditional Lebanese sweet that’s popular for breakfast, mainly on Sundays. Usually the whole family gathers to enjoy this warm dish for a lazy and rich breakfast.

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Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

A delicious breakfast recipe found on gilde.no
Granola Pancakes with Bacon / Müslipannekaker med Bacon

Pancakes for breakfast gets even better with bacon. The combination of sweet and salty is unbeatable.

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English Porridge / Engelsk Havregrøt

A classic breakfast porridge recipe found on food52.com
English Porridge / Engelsk Havregrøt

This porridge is just right. It calls for equal parts of two styles of oats, which means the steel-cut bits keep their pop, while the rolled oats melt around them — and getting them to the perfect texture only takes 20 minutes. Cooking with half milk, half water is enough to make it feel rich and loving, without slogging you down first thing in the morning. This will seem like a lot of salt. But it won’t be too much, because at the end you’ll add something sweet and something milky and it will all live in harmony.

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Danish Egg And Bacon Cake / Dansk Egg- og Baconpanne

A breakfast recipe from “The Love Of Cooking” (Kjærligheten Til Matlaging) published published by Ebury Press in 1972
Danish Egg And Bacon Cake / Dansk Egg- og Baconpanne

The Danes take breakfast seriously (as they do all other meals) so a dry slice of bread with a quickly added spread will hardly do after the morning shower in that neck of the woods. This delicious skillet dish should prove my point – Ted

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Potato Pancakes with Crispy Bacon / Potetkaker med Sprøstekt Flesk

A great breakfast recipe found in “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Potetkaker med sptøstekt flesk_post

A simple mixture of potatoes and onions, here transformed into airy potato pancakes with a “crown” of crispy bacon. A lovey smell will spread in the kitchen while you cook them!

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Oat Porridge and Compote of Dried Fruit / Havregrøt og Kompott av Tørket Frukt

A breakfast recipe from “Sunt og Godt” (Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988
Oat Porridge and Compote of Dried Fruit / Havregrøt og Kompott av Tørket Frukt

A bowl full of steaming, old-fashioned oat porridge taste great with spicy fruit compote and a dollop of yogurt on top.

I grew up eating oat porridge every weekday as a kid. Mom soaked the oats over night and made the porridge in the morning. It was not a fancy kind like the one above, just plain porridge with a little milk and a drizzle of sugar, but I loved it anyway – Ted

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British Fry-Up / Britisk Fry-Up

A real classic British breakfast recipe found in a booklet published by gilde.no
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It was somewhat strange to find such an utter British dish in a booklet from a Norwegian meat supplier, but so what. I’m a real sucker for a solid breakfast and always go for the full english when in Britiain. Continental is for sissies – Ted  😉

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Velvety Oat Porridge / Fløyelsmyk Havregrøt

A classic Norwegian porridge recipe found on
lindastuhaug.blogg.no via alleoppskrifter.no
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For many Norwegians oat porridge is a good start to the day, but it might as well be enjoyed for lunch, dinner or supper. Adjust the batch according to your needs, and feel free to use another topping like fruit, berries, nuts, cottage cheese or similar.

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One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

A quick breakfast recipe found on BBCgoodfood
One-Pan English Breakfast / Pannestekt Engelsk Frokost

This combines all the best ingredients of a traditional English breakfast in one frying pan, with no need to chop anything.

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Millet porridge / Hirsegrøt

A classic breakfast porridge recipe found on tine.no
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Millet porridge is a flavorful porridge suitable for both breakfast and and an evening meal. The porridge can be cooked with whole grain or millet flakes.

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Rice á la Soeur Nightingale / Ris á la Soeur Nightingale

A great breakfast recipe found on yourhomemagazine.co.uk
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NPG x82368; Florence NightingaleFlorence Nightingale was a statistician and social reformer who later became recognised as the founder of modern nursing. Popularly known as the ‘Lady with the Lamp’, Nightingale dedicated her life to helping wounded soldiers during the Crimean War.

Florence Nightingale enjoyed food, and it became one of her few pleasures when she began to suffer from ill health later in life. She was particularly fond of curry, which was the inspiration for this particular breakfast recipe developed in memory of Florence by Chef Charles Elme Francatelli.

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Semolina Porridge / Mannagrynsgröt

A Swedish breakfast porridge found on receptfavoriter.se
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Porridge made from semolina is great with cold milk, cinnamon, sugar, applesauce, jams, nuts, fruit salad or seeds. Semolina is the small grains from the innermost part of the wheat.

This kind of porridge is popular for breakfast in Scandinavia not least among childeren. Semolina porridge is particularly popular in Sweden.

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French Croissant / Franske Horn

A classic French recipe found in “Mat for Hverdag og Fest”
(Food for Everydays and Parties) published by
Hjemmets kokebokklubb in 1884
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In context

The Kipferl, ancestor of the croissant, has been documented in Austria going back at least as far as the 13th century, in various shapes. The Kipferl can be made plain or with nuts or other fillings (some consider the rugelach a form of Kipferl).

The birth of the croissant itself–that is, its adaptation from the plainer form of Kipferl, before the invention of viennoiserie–can be dated to at least 1839 (some say 1838), when an Austrian artillery officer, August Zang, founded a Viennese bakery (“Boulangerie Viennoise”) at 92, rue de Richelieu in Paris. This bakery, which served Viennese specialities including the Kipferl and the Vienna loaf, quickly became popular and inspired French imitators (and the concept, if not the term, of viennoiserie, a 20th-century term for supposedly Vienna-style pastries). The French version of the Kipferl was named for its crescent (croissant) shape and has become an identifiable shape across the world.

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Alan Davidson, editor of the Oxford Companion to Food, found no printed recipe for the present-day croissant in any French recipe book before the early 20th century; the earliest French reference to a croissant he found was among the “fantasy or luxury breads” in Payen’s Des substances alimentaires, 1853. However, early recipes for non-laminated croissants can be found in the 19th century and at least one reference to croissants as an established French bread appeared as early as 1850.

Zang himself returned to Austria in 1848 to become a press magnate, but the bakery remained popular for some time afterwards, and was mentioned in several works of the time: “This same M. Zank [sic]…founded around 1830 [sic], in Paris, the famous Boulangerie viennoise”. Several sources praise this bakery’s products: “Paris is of exquisite delicacy; and, in particular, the succulent products of the Boulangerie Viennoise”; “which seemed to us as fine as if it came from the Viennese bakery on the rue de Richelieu”.

Croissant-ParisBy 1869, the croissant was well established enough to be mentioned as a breakfast staple, and in 1872 Charles Dickens wrote (in his periodical All the Year Round) of “the workman’s pain de ménage and the soldier’s pain de munition, to the dainty croissant on the boudoir table”

The puff pastry technique which now characterizes the croissant was already mentioned in the late 17th century, when La Varenne’s Le Cuisinier françois gave a recipe for it in the 1680, and possibly earlier, editions. It was typically used not on its own but for shells holding other ingredients (as in a vol-au-vent). It does not appear to be mentioned in relation to the croissant until the 20th century.

1840 Farm Pancakes / 1840 Gårdspannekaker

An 18th century recipe found on food52.com
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In Context: The Ancient Greeks made pancakes called τηγανίτης (tēganitēs), ταγηνίτης (tagēnitēs) or ταγηνίας (tagēnias), all words deriving from τάγηνον (tagēnon), “frying pan”. The earliest attested references on tagenias are in the works of the 5th century BC poets Cratinus and Magnes. Tagenites were made with wheat flour, olive oil, honey, and curdled milk, and were served for breakfast. Another kind of pancake was σταιτίτης (staititēs), from σταίτινος (staitinos), “of flour or dough of spelt”, derived from σταῖς (stais), “flour of spelt”. Athenaeus mentions, in his Deipnosophistae, staititas topped with honey, sesame, and cheese. The Middle English word Pancake appears in English in the 15th century.

The Ancient Romans called their fried concoctions “alia dulcia,” which was Latin for “other sweets”. These were much different from what are known as pancakes today.

Text from Wikipedia