Traditional Norwegian Fruit Porridge with Milk / Tradisjonell Fruktgrøt med Melk

A traditional Norwegian recipe found on matprat.noTraditional Norwegian Fruit Porridge with Milk / Tradisjonell Fruktgrøt med Melk

Indulge in a classic everyday Norwegian dessert when you feel like feeding your sweet tooth after the meatballs or fish patties. This fruit porridge is made with apples, plums and raisins, but there is room for variations here!

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How bananas are better than pills for treating depression, constipation and more

An article from 2 May 2014 by Ethan A. Huff,
staff writer at naturalnews.com

How bananas are better than pills for treating depression, constipation and moreThey’re often the fruit of choice for athletes looking to boost their electrolyte levels and get a quick energy boost, but bananas are a whole lot more than just a sweet treat or a pleasant addition to a morning smoothie. Rich in vitamins, minerals and other beneficial compounds, bananas can also serve as a natural remedy for treating depression, promoting regularity, boosting brain power and calming the nerves, among other important functions within the body.

A closer look at the scientific literature on bananas reveals a host of little-known benefits associated with eating the fruit. Everything from regulating blood pressure and healing a damaged gut to relieving the symptoms of arthritis and even battling drug addiction have been attributed to this simple fruit, easily labeling it as one of the most amazing, widely available and inexpensive superfruits known to man.

Eating bananas can help relieve depression and improve one’s mood

As bananas contain tryptophan, the same compound in turkey meat that promotes a calm, relaxed mood, bananas are also said to aid in relieving the symptoms of depression. Combined with the benefits of B vitamins, the conversion of tryptophan into serotonin, the so-called “happy hormone,” helps improve mood and overall feelings of well-being.

“Keeping your B vitamin intake up could ward off depression as you age,” explains Emily Main in a Rodale News article. “[W]hen you combine food sources of B vitamins with the added boost of supplements, the positive effects on depression are more pronounced.”

The fiber in bananas helps promote regularity

Like many other whole fruits and vegetables, bananas are an excellent source of soluble fiber. Fiber is necessary for maintaining regularity. Remembering to incorporate bananas into your regular diet can help you avoid constipation and other intestine- and bowel-related conditions.

“Bananas help restore normal bowel function, especially if you have diarrhea,” explains one report. “This fruit also has lots of fiber to aid digestion.”

Boost your brainpower with bananas

In addition to B vitamins, bananas also contain high levels of potassium, an electrolyte mineral used by the heart, kidneys and other body organs for normal function. Brain neurons rely on high levels of potassium, a lack of which can lead to “brain fog” and other cognitive problems.

“A 2013 study published in the Journal of Neuroscience Letters researched potassium supplementation and levels of free radicals in the brain,” reads a SFGate report on potassium and memory.

“After 20 days of supplementation with potassium, the levels of harmful free radicals decreased significantly, reducing the amount of oxidative damage that occurred in the test subjects. Because oxidative damage leads to decreased brain function, potassium counteracts this effect and prevents brain damage.”

B vitamins in bananas help calm the nervous system

Of the eight known B vitamins, bananas are an excellent source of five of them — thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pyridoxine (B6) and folate (B9). The basic food source of the nervous system, these B vitamins aid the body in digesting and using other nutrients, as well as supporting a healthy heart, muscles and nerves.

B vitamins “help produce and maintain new cells and are an essential part of many biochemical reactions in your body,” explains a report on bananas written by Joanne Marie for SFGate. “Bananas contain useful amounts of these B vitamins, ranging from 785 micrograms of niacin to 24 micrograms of folate in one medium banana.”

The History of Pineapples

The History of Pineapples

It is not a pine nor an apple, and it is not native to Hawaii. However, since it was first canned and became a major crop there, we associate pineapple with Hawaii and the tastes of the islands. It has wonderful tenderizing enzymes and goes especially well with pork as well as, seafood, and sweet-and-sour dishes. Of course, there are always plenty of dessert recipes using pineapple.

Pineapple History

The History of PineapplesAnanas comosus is the botanical name of the fruit we know as the pineapple.

Native to South America, it was named for its resemblance to a pine cone. The term pineapple (or pinappel in Middle English) did not appear in English print until around 1664.

Christopher Columbus is credited with discovering the pineapple on the island of Guadeloupe in 1493, although the fruit had long been grown in South America. He called it piña de Indes meaning “pine of the Indians.”

The History of PineapplesSouth American Guarani Indians cultivated pineapples for food. They called it nanã, meaning “excellent fruit.”

Another explorer, Magellan, is credited with finding pineapples in Brazil in 1519, and by 1555, the luscious fruit was being exported with gusto to England. It soon spread to India, Asia, and the West Indies.

When George Washington tasted pineapple in 1751 in Barbados, he declared it his favorite tropical fruit. Although the pineapple thrived in Florida, it was still a rarity for most Americans.

Captain James Cook later introduced the pineapple to Hawaii circa 1770.

However, commercial cultivation did not begin until the 1880s when steamships made transporting the perishable fruit viable.

The History of Pineapples

In 1903, James Drummond Dole began canning pineapple, making it easily accessible worldwide. Production stepped up dramatically when a new machine automated the skinning and coring of the fruit.

The Dole Hawaiian Pineapple Company was a booming business by 1921, making pineapple Hawaii’s largest crop and industry.

Today, Hawaii produces only ten percent of the world’s pineapple crops. Other countries contributing to the pineapple industry include Mexico, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Philippines, Thailand, Costa Rica, China, and Asia.

The History of Pineapples

Pineapple is the third most canned fruit behind applesauce and peaches.

Text from thespruce.com

Jane Austen’s Black Butter Jam / Jane Austens Smørbare Syltetøy

A simple but delicious jam recipe found on Bite From The Past
Jane Austens Black Butter Jam_post

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: I have been dying to make this ever since I spotted it in The Jane Austen Cookbook by Maggie Black and Deirdre LeFaye.

This is the easiest jam you’ll ever make in your life-and it makes good use of leftover pieces of fruit. It’s funny to me that the instructions state this is a jam for children-probably because it’s a mixed up combination of fruit. I think it’s a wonderful addition to any biscuit or bread at tea time.

In this batch, I used strawberries, two apples that were starting to shrivel, and a couple of really ripe pears. Peel the skins off the apples and pears. You can also use peaches or plums-just be sure to blanche them first to remove the skin.

I did not can these – although you can to preserve them longer. I merely put mine in canning jars and set them in the very back of my refrigerator, where they lasted for several months!

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