Traditional Norwegian Redcurrant Jelly / Tradisjonell Ripsgelé

A quick and simple jelly recipe found on dinmat.noTraditional Norwegian Redcurrant Jelly / Tradisjonell Ripsgelé

Conserving redcurrant has been known from the 17th century and in the 18th century the redcurrant bushes were widely spread in Norway. In Norwegian gardens there are very many bushes still, but there is little commercial production. Redcurrant contains pectin which makes it very suitable for jelly and jam. One portion of this recipe makes one jar of finished jelly.

We had both redcurrant, blackcurrant and gooseberry bushes in the garden where I grew up so this is stuff I grew up on – Ted

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Redcurrant Jelly / Ripsgelé

A jelly recipe found on alleoppskrifter.no
Redcurrant Jelly / Ripsgelé

Redcurrant jelly has long traditions in Norway, both as a flavoring for different meat dishes in the same way as cranberry jam, or as sandwich spread and for use in cakes and desserts. And now the time for making the jelly has come – Ted

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Coffee Ribbon Bavarian / Lagdelt Dessert Smaksatt med Kaffe

A dessert recipe from “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925Coffee Ribbon Bavarian / Lagdelt Dessert Smaksatt med Kaffe

Another of those desserts for adults from the book that tells you the story of coffee and gives you recipes for coffee tasting goodies.

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1860s Crab Apple Jelly / Villeplegele fra 1860tallet

A historic wild fruit recipe found on World Turn’d Upside Down
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Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: When Pehr Kalm, a Swedish-Finnish naturalist, visited Pennsylvania in the 1750s, he remarked that crab apples were plentiful but were not good for anything but making vinegar. Crab apples have a reputation of being a useless fruit and a nuisance. As Pehr Kalm suggested, I had actually intended to make vinegar out of my collection.

Once the tweeting birds were replaced with squawking crows, too close for comfort, I decided I had enough to make a small container of vinegar and one of preserves of some kind. I took the collection home and rinsed it in a few washes. I was still unsure of what kind of preserve I wanted to make. I was stuck between making marmalade and jelly. I ended up making jelly because more people would enjoy it.

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Quince and Geranium Jelly / Kvede og Geranium Gelé

A classic English preserve recipe found in
“Harrods Cookery Book” published in 1985

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The golden, down-covered quince changes color when it is cooked to give a pinkish-amber jelly. This autumnal fruit is high in pectin and is therefore ideal for jams, jellies and preserves. For an English touch to a meal, serve with meat or poultry.

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Traditional Blackberry Jelly / Tradisjonell Bjørnebærgelé

A traditional jelly recipe found on about.com/food/
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There has to be some compensation for the disappearance of summer and the sunshine. The abundance of wonderful autumn fruits, vegetables and berries do a great job. From September onwards it is possible to pick from a an abundance including sloes, bilberries, plums, pumpkins, and  wild mushroooms and fat juicy blackberries.

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Strawberry Orange Mousse – Jordbær Og Appelsin Mousse

A recipe from “Cookery In Colour – A Picture Encyclopaedia For Every Occasion” published by Hamlyn in 1960

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