Honey and Mustard Sauce / Honning- og Sennepssaus

A medieval spicy sauce recipe found at cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval Monday_headingHoney and Mustard Sauce_post

Mustard was much used by the Romans and later was very popular with the Anglo Saxons. It grew locally and so was cheap. It could be used to makes sauces for meat and fish as well as dressings for salads. It helped to preserve other foods as well as having healthy properties of its own.

The sauces were generally made from a mixture of ground mustard seeds, vinegar, wine and often honey, with spices or other flavourings added according to what people liked.

They could then be stored for several weeks. Mustard’s ‘hotness’ gets less after it is mixed and kept for a few days, which may account for the strength of the sauces often made – which would be much too hot for most of us today.

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Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

Oysters on Skewers / Østers på Grillspyd

A shellfish dinner recipe foungd on recipes.history.org
Oysters on Skewers / Østers på Grillspyd

Original 18. Century Recipe

“Put a bit of butter into a stew-pan, throw in large oysters and some mushrooms, with pepper, salt, pounded cloves, parsley, and sweet herbs chopped, a dust of flour; stir these about half a minute, then put the oysters on silver skewers, a mushroom between each; roll them in crumbs of bread; broil them; put into the stew-pan a little good gravy, let it be thick and palatable; a little lemon-juice. Serve the oysters on the skewers; the sauce on the dish.”

—From “The lady’s assistant for regulating and supplying the table: being a complete system of cookery… including the fullest and choicest receipts of various kinds.” 

by Charlotte Mason (1787)

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Free Historic Cook Books On The Net – Part 1

Free Historic Cook Books

A lot of the recipes found on blogs featuring historic recipes are found in these free books found on the net. The books on Google Books are not downloadable and has to be read on Google’s pages, but the books on archive.org can be downloaded in pdf and other formats.

APICIUS REDIVIVUS
or,
THE COOK’S ORACLE
published in 1817

Google Booksarchive.org

THE FRUGAL HOUSEWIFE
or,
Complete Woman Cook
published in 1796

Google Booksarchive.org

THE WHOLE
DUTY of a WOMAN
OR AN
Infalliabe GUIDE
TO THE FAIR SEX
published in 1707

Google Booksarchive.org

ENGLAND’S
NEWEST WAY in all
SORTS
OF
COOKERY, PASTRY
AND
All Pickles that are fit to be used

published in 1708

Google BooksLibrary of Congress
The one on Library of Congress can be
downloaded as jpg’s

A
COLLECTION
Of above Three Hundered
RECEIPTS
IN
Cookery,
Physick and Surgery

Publshed in 1714

Google Booksarchive.org

Jane Austen’s Beef And Stilton Pasties / Jane Austens Kjøtt Og Stilton Pasties

An afternoon tea pastie recipe from Jane Austen’s days
found on
Bite From The Past
Jane Austen’s Beef And Stilton Pastie / Jane Austen’s Kjøtt Og Stilton Pasties

The Girl who runs Bite From The Past writes: Bonnie Wise, one of the organizers of the festival and a member of the Jane Austen Society of North America, was kind enough to answer a few questions for me via email-and to send me two recipes for afternoon tea. Bonnie said this recipe is based on one found in Victoria Magazine called TeaTime Bliss.

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Medieval Monday – Hykonys In Bruette / Hykony I Bruette

A chicken with a spicy sauce recipe from 1450 found at
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Heading

Medieval Monday - Hykonys In Bruette / Hykony I Bruette

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: You can use the whole chicken with giblets if you desire. If you do so, chop the chicken into quarter. About 400 g chicken with the bones should be enough per person. I used legs because they are cheap and easy to get hold of.

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Lumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

A fourteenth century recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingLumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

saaraSaara whe runs Let Hem Boyle writes: I have to say that I love mustard! All different kinds of… it can be strong, mild, vinegary, spiced.. I do like them all. Making mustard for an event has been a plan for long time, but I haven’t done it until Midwinter Feast. This recipe is great! You can make it beforehand and store it in the fridge. It will be good stored in fridge for couple of weeks.

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

Original recipe from Forme of Cury, 1390

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Medieval Monday – Arbolettys

A medieval spicy egg dish recipefound on
One Year and Thousand Eggs Medieval Monday_headingMedieval Monday – Arbolettys

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: This egg dish is kind of scrambled eggs with herbs. It is very good with toasted bread.

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Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

A medieval fruit paste recipe found on Turnspit & Table
Medieval Monday - 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16ende Århundre

Kim who runs ‘Turnspit & Table‘ writes: Quince Paste is the ancestor of modern marmalade, people have been preserving quinces for a very long time. The Greeks and Romans packed them tightly into honey to make melomeli or cooked it down to a paste with honey and pepper, often recommending them as treatments for complaints of the stomach.

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Medieval Monday – Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

A historic pie recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.comHeadingMedieval Monday - Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

Tak fayre porke y-broylid, & grynd it smal with yolkys of Eyroun; than take Pepir, Gyngere, & grynd it smal, & melle it with-al, & a lytel hony, & floryssche thin cofyns with-ynne & with-owte, & hele hem with thin ledys, & late hem bake, & serue forth – Original recipe

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17th Century Quaking Pudding / Skjelvende Pudding fra det 17ende Århundre

A historic pudding recipe found on Tunspit & Table
17th Century Quaking Pudding_post

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: England has been famous for its puddings for centuries, and the word is now interchangeable with dessert, but it wasn’t always so. Historically puddings were essentially sausages with a filling stuffed into the stomach or intestines of an animal (the word probably comes from the Anglo-Norman word bodin meaning entrails). Sometimes they were kind of like dumplings, cooked in the broth with the meat for dinner.

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Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy / Enkle Martha Washington Sjokolade kuler

A historic candy recipe found at recipelion.com
Easy Martha Washington Chocolate Candy_post

A holiday tradition for many families, Martha Washington’s candy is a treat that’s easy to make and even more delicious to eat. This particular recipe for No-Bake Martha Washington Candy features just a few choice ingredients, making it even simpler to prepare.

Martha WashingtonMartha Washington (née Dandridge; June 13 [O.S. June 2] 1731– May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States. Although the title was not coined until after her death, Martha Washington is considered to be the first First Lady of the United States. During her lifetime she was often referred to as “Lady Washington”

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Medieval Monday – Soul Cakes / Sjelekaker

A delicious cake recipe found on Lavender & Lovage
Medieval Monday_headingSoul Cakes_post

Karen who runs  “Lavender & Lovage” writes: These little cakes are a cross between a biscuit and a scone and were traditionally made for All Soul’s Day, which is on the 2nd of November. Packed with currants and mixed spice, these lovely little cakes are delicious with an afternoon cuppa.

This recipe is adapted from “A Calendar of Feasts – Cattern Cakes and Lace” by Julia Jones and Barbara Deer.

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19th Century Excellent Potato Pudding / 1800talls Utmerket Potetpudding

A classic 19th century save-all recipe found on Tunspit & Table
19th Excellent Potato Pudding_post

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: These recipes are both sweet and savoury, sometimes baked in a pie case and sometimes without, and they lasted from at least the mid-18th century to the end of the 19th. It’s not hard to understand why these puddings would have been popular, they are basically all cheap starch, flavoured with relatively small amounts of more expensive ingredients – brandy, citrus fruits, currants, sugar, or a little spice. They are also quite an appetising way of using up left over boiled potatoes, The Family Save-All specifically recommends saving up the potatoes left from two or three days meals. I also quite like that it is recommended for children, “children of larger growth”, invalids and the elderly, i.e. everyone.

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Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A medieval omelet recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingHanoney_post

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