Tart in Ymber Day / Terter for Emberdagene

A fasting tart recipe found at Let Hem Boyle
Tart in Ymber Day / Terter for Emberdagene

In the liturgical calendar of the Western Christian churches, Ember  (Ymber) days are four separate sets of three days within the same week — specifically, the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday — roughly equidistant in the circuit of the year, that are set aside for fasting and prayer. These days set apart for special prayer and fasting were considered especially suitable for the ordination of clergy. The Ember Days are known in Latin as the quattuor anni tempora (the “four seasons of the year”), or formerly as the jejunia quattuor temporum (“fasts of the four seasons”).

The four quarterly periods during which the ember days fall are called the embertides.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Pumpes – Meat Balls / Kjøttboller

A historic dinner recipe found on CookItPumpes – Meat Balls / Kjøttboller

The original recipe:

‘Take fayre buttys of vele and hewe hem,and grnd hem,and wyth eyroun(eggs); caste powder pepyr, gyngere, safroun, galingal and herbes also raysonys of coraunce. Sethe in a pan wyth fayre water. Than putte it on a spete round and lete hem rosty. Serve hem forth.’

Pommeaulx (abridged)

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Ryschewys Closed – Dumplings / Melboller

A historic recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs
Ryschewys Closed – Dumplings / Melboller

Take flour and eggs & knead together / take figs, raisins & dates & put out the stones & blanched almonds & good powder & bray together / make coffins of the length of a span / put thy stuffing therein, in every cake his portion/ fold them & boil them in water & afterward roast them on a griddle & give forth.

From Laud MS. 553, Volume I

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

A classic soup recipe found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupper Ware in 1970

Cock-a-Leekie Soup / Kyllingsuppe med Purre

While it is called “Scotland’s National Soup,” it probably originated as a chicken and onion soup in France. By the 16th century, it had made its way to Scotland, where the onions were replaced with leeks. The first recipe was printed in 1598, though the name “cock-a-leekie” did not come into use until the 18th century.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge scottish_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

White Leek Bruet / Hvit Purre Bruet

A recipe from 1420 found on Inn At The CrossroadsWhite Leek Bruet / Hvit Purre Bruet

Chelsea at “Inn At The Crossroads” writes: The leeks and salt pork cook until they are so soft that they almost melt, leaving the slivered almonds to make a textural statement. Each bite transitions from the saltiness of the broth, to the soft flavors of the leeks and pork, then ends with a strong nutty, crunchy finish. I’ve made it as in the original, but if I were to make it again, I might include a sprig or two of herbs for some added nutrients and complexity. It would also be tasty paired with a nice toasted slice of dark rye bread.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

A 17th century pie recipe found on historyextra.com
Marlborough Pie / Marlborough Pai

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates marlborough pie – a tasty pie that travelled to America in the 17th century.

Sam writes: English chef Robert May created this apple custard pie when compiling dishes for his 1660 recipe book The Accomplisht Cook.

As the English established colonies in the New World during the 17th century, settlers took the pie recipe with them. Since the 19th century it has become a favourite dessert in the US during holidays such as Thanksgiving.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Eat Like an Egyptian

An article by Stephanie Butler publised on
history.com october 2013
Eat Like an Egyptian_04

Archeological discoveries have told us much about how ancient Egyptians worshiped, celebrated and mourned. But these scientific finds have also provided tantalizing clues about how–and what–this complex civilization ate. From grains like emmer and kamut to cloudy beer and honey-basted gazelle, this week’s Hungry History focuses on the meals of ancient Egypt.

Eat Like an Egyptian_05

Bread and beer were the two staples of the Egyptian diet. Everyone from the highest priest to the lowliest laborer would eat these two foods every day, although the quality of the foods for the priest would undoubtedly be higher. The main grain cultivated in Egypt was emmer. Better known today as farro, emmer happens to be a fairly well balanced source of nutrition: it’s higher in minerals and fiber than similar grains. Breads and porridge were made from the grain, as well as a specially devised product that modern-day archeologists call “beer bread.”

Eat Like an Egyptian_02Beer bread was made from dough that used more yeast than normal breads, and it was baked at a temperature that didn’t kill off the yeast cultures. Brewers crumbled the bread into vats and let it ferment naturally in water. This yielded a thick and cloudy brew that would probably disgust our modern palates. But it was also nourishing and healthy, and filled in many nutritive deficiencies of the lower-class diet.

But ancient Egyptians did not survive on carbohydrates alone: Hunters could capture a variety of wild game, including hippos, gazelles, cranes as well as smaller species such as hedgehogs. Fish were caught, then salted and preserved; in fact fish curing was so important to Egyptians that only temple officials were allowed to do it. Honey was prized as a sweetener, as were dates, raisins and other dried fruits. Wild vegetables abounded, like celery, papyrus stalks and onions.

Eat Like an Egyptian_01

Although no recipes from the times remain, we have a fair idea of how the Egyptians prepared their food thanks to dioramas and other objects left in tombs. Laborers ate two meals a day: a morning meal of bread, beer and often onions, and a more hearty dinner with boiled vegetables, meat and more bread and beer. Nobles ate well, with vegetables, meat and grains at every meal, plus wine and dairy products like butter and cheese. Priests and royalty ate even better. Tombs detail meals of honey-roasted wild gazelle, spit-roasted ducks, pomegranates and a berry-like fruit called jujubes with honey cakes for dessert. To top it all off, servant girls would circulate with jugs of wine to refill empty glasses: the perfect end to an Egyptian banquet.

Eat Like an Egyptian_03

Medieval Monday – Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

A staple medieval recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.com
Medieval Monday - Almond Milk / Mandelmelk

Almond milk was a staple of the medieval kitchen. It was used in a wide variety of dishes as a substitute for milk or cream, especially on “fish days”, when the church placed restrictions on what foods could be eaten (the most prominent of which were the days during lent). Fortunately, almond milk is quick and easy to make.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A historic egg dish recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Hanoney_page_thumb2_thumb

Take eggs, and draw the yolks and white through a strainer, And take onions, And Shred them small. And take fair butter or grease, and scarcely cover over the pan therewith. And fry the onions together, then let them fry together a little while. And take them up, And serve them forth so, all broken in a dish.

From Harleian MS. 4016, I Volume

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Medieval Monday – Salmon Cakes / Laksekaker

A medieval fish patties recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Salmon Cakes / Laksekaker

These fish cakes are based on the osterhlaf (a seafood loaf). Salmon is mentioned by Ælfric (an English abbot, and prolific writer who lived around 955 to 1010) but other fish could be used. These are individual patties rather than one large loaf which is difficult to manage cooking on a modern cooker. The oatmeal gives them a light crunchy texture, quite different from fish cakes made with potato.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

A 13th Century Arabic pattie recipe found on “Let Hem Boyle
A Type of Ahrash – Spiced Meat Patties with a Sauce / Krydrede Kjøttkaker med Saus

Saara who runs ‘Let Hem Boyle’  writes: This is the recipe that was used by Sayyid Abu al-Hasan and others in Morocco, and they called it isfîriyâ.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Medieval Monday – Sweet Frumenty / Søt Frumenty

A Twelfth Night side dish recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
Sweet Frumenty_post2

This is a standard dish appearing in many variations over the centuries. It makes a lovely side dish, especially with strongly flavoured meats. It was a symbolic dish in winter, a sign that spring would come. It later came to be served as a festival dish on Twelfth Night (5th of January).

This is the original recipe:

‘To make frumente. Tak clene whete & braye yt wel in a morter tyl the holes gon of; seethe it til it breste in water. Nym it up & lat it cole. Tak good broth & swete mylk of kyn or of almand & tempere it therwith. Nym yelkes of eyren rawe & saffroun & cast therto; salt it: lat it naught boyle after the etren ben cast therinne. Messe it forth.’

(Curye on Inglysch CI.IV.i.)

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

An eighteen centure sickbed recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
Eighteenth Century Sickbed Custard / 1700-talls Sykeleiepudding

Karen Hammonds who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Modern custard recipes usually call for vanilla, but that wasn’t used in America in colonial times. Thomas Jefferson first brought vanilla beans back from France in the 1890s, and as Richard Sax noted in Classic Home Desserts, vanilla extract wasn’t widely available until the mid-19th century. Eighteenth-century custards were flavored with wine or brandy, tea, or spices. I added nutmeg to Simmons’s recipe since it seemed so bland — but I guess that was sort of the point.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Spiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

A hot beverage recipe from the 17th century found on historyextra.comSpiced Hot Chocolate / Krydret Varm Sjokolade

In every issue of BBC History Magazine, picture editor Sam Nott brings you a recipe from the past. In this article, Sam recreates spiced hot chocolate – a chocolate treat enjoyed by kings and queens.

Sam writes: Hot chocolate has always been one of my favourite drinks but I have often wondered when the drink was first consumed in Britain.

I was surprised to find out that chocolate itself arrived in England in the 1600s, with evidence of it being drunk at the court of Charles I – before it was deemed a sinful pleasure by Oliver Cromwell, and banned.

This recipe is based on the drink served at the English court during the 17th and 18th centuries and the spices make it smell – and taste – wonderful. It’s also very simple to make. The drink is very rich – you won’t need a big portion – but since chocolate was believed to have medicinal properties well into the mid-18th century, you can see it as a relatively guilt-free treat!

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Medieval Monday–Dried Apples / Tørkede Epler

A Medieval fruit preserving method found on cookit.e2bn.org 
Dried Apples_post
Dried apple rings were popular in the 16th century, as a way of storing fruit to last for the winter. Dried fruit could be soaked and used in puddings and sauces as needed.These keep very well and still make a nice healthy snack.
000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge historic000_norway_recipe_marker_ny