Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Pure Sodaworks

The story in their own words

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Pure Sodaworks

2011: You Gotta Start Somewhere, Right?

In March of 2011, Matt and Tiffany Rogers had an idea to launch a soda brand. Of course, they didn’t know exactly what they were doing or how to accomplish that goal. Undaunted, they brought on their friend, Shawn Clouse, and put together a mobile soda fountain so that they could start selling sodas at local events in and around Chattanooga, Tennessee.

2012 – 2013: Kickstarter, The Makery, and Bottling. Oh my!

The response to our soda idea was overwhelmingly positive to say the least. As our fanbase grew, so did our desire to create a product that people could take home and share with friends and family. We decided to turn to Kickstarter (a relatively new crowd-funding platform at the time) to assist with raising the necessary funds to outfit a facility and purchase bottling equipment.

2014 – 2015: Today, Chattanooga. Tomorrow … THE WORLD! Or so we thought.

After spending two years on Chattanooga’s North Shore, we decided to make a move across town and focus on growth and distribution. Over the course of the next three years, we saw our sodas go all over the United States. At the same time, we were winning awards and getting recognition from some big names.

2016: It’s a Major Award … and a Major Change.

Throughout the first half of 2016, we continued promoting the Pure Sodaworks brand and our sodas, reaching as far and wide as we could. This culminated when we swept the awards at the 2016 Homer Soda Fest, winning both Best in Show and Best of Fest with our Apple Pie Soda… what a thrill! Needless to say, our team was riding high and feeling great about our future at that point.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Pure Sodaworks

However, the latter half of 2016 arrived with some major, unforeseen setbacks. First, our local supplier for glass moved away from our city. That change greatly impacted the minimum amount that we were required to purchase in order to make shipping costs worthwhile. Second, our bottling machine, which was actually built to bottle beer rather than soda (which, unfortunately for us in this case, has a much higher carbonation level than beer) started showing just how poorly suited it was for soda manufacturing. We knew right then that our current method of production was no longer sustainable.

That humbling one-two punch prompted us to take a step back and re-evaluate our product, our production methods, our costs, our pricing, our growth, our reach… basically every single aspect of the business. What we determined was that we needed to make some major changes in order to continue providing quality sodas to our loyal, ever-encouraging, soda-loving fans. It was time for a reboot.

2017: Learning Lessons. Looking Ahead. Moving Forward.

After 2016, we knew that we needed to change things in order to maintain the high quality of our product. At the beginning of 2017, we went through and addressed three main areas in order to improve both our product and our business.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Pure Sodaworks

That’s the story so far. We hope that you will come along for the ride as we continue on our soda-making journey. Be sure to follow us on social media and visit our site regularly for news and updates. We feel more confident than ever that, with the ongoing encouragement from our devoted fans, we will continue making Mighty Good Soda for years to come!

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Royal Tru

DSC03892royal-tru-orangeRoyal Tru is a carbonated fruit drink brand owned by The Coca-Cola Company that is only available in the Philippines. It also uses the same styling as its Coca-Cola global cousin Fanta. It was introduced in 1922 by the San Miguel Brewery as their first non-alcoholic, carbonated beverage and it was primarily referred to as Royal Tru-Orange due to its original flavour, while other variants like Royal Tru-Dalandan, Royal Tru-Grape, and Royal Tru-Orange Light were introduced in 2003, and Royal Tru-Lemon was introduced in the last quarter of 2012.

History

royal-tru-orange-in-plastic-bottleRoyal Tru-Orange was first introduced in the 1922 by the San Miguel Brewery as their first non-alcoholic, carbonated beverage. However, it became popular since the beverage targeted teenagers as its consumers. It was available in single-serve bottles and contained orange pulp bits. Royal Tru-Orange was also one of the pioneering teams of Philippine Basketball Association in 1975. It is the only remaining pioneering franchise in the league, although it is carrying the San Miguel Beer brand as of 2008.

Royal-Tru-Orange-ad1976Royal Tru-Orange gained much attention in the late 1980s, after its logo and formulation (without the orange pulp bits) were changed, through an advertising campaign that starred teen model RJ Ledesma playing the role of Joey. The first television advertisement in the series, wherein Joey was being egged on by friends to introduce himself to a girl named Jenny, was directed by noted film director Lino Brocka.

Soda &Soft Drink Saturday – Surge & Urge

chrome_2017-08-05_14-26-54Urge is a citrus flavoured soft drink produced by Coca Cola Norway. It is the Norwegian equivalent of Surge. It was originally introduced in 501255-9f3a3-product_detailNorway in 1996 as a test product. Surge was launched in the United States in 1997. Surge and Urge are no longer sold anywhere else, but after a steady decline, Urge sales increased greatly in Norway, reaching a market share near 10%, despite receiving no marketing since its initial launch. Urge was originally available in Norway in 0.5L and 1.5L bottles, and later also in 0.33L cans, but in the beginning of 1999 the 1.5L bottles were taken off the market, due to unsatisfactory sales. The cans also silently vanished from the market a few years later, leaving only the 0.5L bottles. It has a high sugar content at 68 grams per 0.5L bottle.

Urge 1.5L bottles was re-launched to the Norwegian market on September 1 2008. The re-launch is credited to a massive campaign by the consumers on the internet community Facebook.

An energy drink version, Urge Intense, was launched in the beginning of 2009. A raspberry flavoured version (“Red Sting”) was released in April 2010.

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Sales in Denmark and Sweden ceased in 2001.


Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Dr Nut

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Dr NutDr. Nut was a soft drink produced by New Orleans-based World Bottling Company (and later by another New Orleans company, Wright Root Beer). It was introduced in the 1930s and was produced until the late 1970s. Dr. Nut had a distinct almond flavor, similar to Amaretto liquor, and bottles were characterized by their plain logo depicting a squirrel nibbling on a large nut. In the 1940s it was marketed at a competitive price, was known for its slogans, and for having a man in a running costume who ran with the Mardi Gras parades.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Dr NutSoda & Soft Drink Saturday - Dr Nut

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Dr NutThe drink was made famous to a new generation in John Kennedy Toole’s novel A Confederacy of Dunces, in which it is a favorite drink of the main character Ignatius Reilly. His copious consumption of the drink is a comic example of the discrepancies between Ignatius’ purportedly ascetic medieval values and his undisciplined, gluttonous lifestyle.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Dr NutBy the time the novel saw print, the beverage was already out of production. A different company attempted to revive the product, but the taste of the new drink lacked the almond flavor of the original and was not well-liked by consumers.

Dr. Nut advertising used to feature a man on the beach, wearing half a nutshell as a bathing suit, and a squirrel as his friend. Many people dressed as this amusing figure during the New Orleans’ Mardi Gras parades.

The History of Root Beer

The History of Root Beer

Smilax ornata (sarsaparilla)Root beer is a sweet soda traditionally made using the sassafras tree Sassafras albidum (sassafras) or the vine Smilax ornata (sarsaparilla) as the primary flavor. Root beer may be alcoholic or non-alcoholic, come naturally free of caffeine or have caffeine added, and carbonated or non-carbonated. It usually has a thick, foamy head when poured. Modern, commercially produced root beer is generally sweet, foamy, carbonated, nonalcoholic, and flavoured using artificial sassafras flavouring. Sassafras root is still used to flavor traditional root beer, but since sassafras was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration due to the controversially claimed carcinogenicity of its constituent safrole, most commercial recipes do not contain sassafras. Some commercial root beers do use a safrole-free sassafras extract.

History

Sassafras albidum (sassafras)Sassafras root beverages were made by indigenous peoples of the Americas for culinary and medicinal reasons before the arrival of Europeans in North America, but European culinary techniques have been applied to making traditional sassafras-based beverages similar to root beer since the 16th century. Root beer was sold in confectionery stores since the 1840s, and written recipes for root beer have been documented since the 1860s. It possibly was combined with soda as early as the 1850s, and root beer sold in stores was most often sold as a syrup rather than a ready-made beverage. The tradition of brewing root beer is thought to have evolved out of other small beer traditions that produced fermented drinks with very low alcohol content that were thought to be healthier to drink than possibly tainted local sources of drinking water, and enhanced by the medicinal and nutritional qualities of the ingredients used. Beyond its aromatic qualities, the medicinal benefits of sassafras were well known to both Native Americans and Europeans, and druggists began marketing root beer for its medicinal qualities.

The History of Root Beer

Pharmacist Charles Elmer Hires was the first to successfully market a commercial brand of root beer. Hires developed his root tea made from sassafras in 1875, debuted a commercial version of root beer at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, and began selling his extract. Hires was a teetotaler who wanted to call the beverage “root tea”. However, his desire to market the product to Pennsylvania coal miners caused him to call his product “root beer”, instead. In 1886, Hires began to bottle a beverage made from his famous extract. By 1893, root beer was distributed widely across the United States. Non-alcoholic versions of root beer became commercially successful, especially during Prohibition.

The History of Root BeerNot all traditional or commercial root beers were sassafras-based. One of Hires’s early competitors was Barq’s, which began selling its sarsaparilla-based root beer in 1898 and was labeled simply as “Barq’s”. In 1919, Roy Allen opened his root-beer stand in Lodi, California, which led to the development of A&W Root Beer. One of Allen’s innovations was that he served his homemade root beer in cold, frosty mugs. IBC Root Beer is another brand of commercially produced root beer that emerged during this period and is still well-known today.

The History of Root Beer

Safrole, the aromatic oil found in sassafras roots and bark that gave traditional root beer its distinctive flavour, was banned for commercially mass-produced foods and drugs by the FDA in 1960. Laboratory animals that were given oral doses of sassafras tea or sassafras oil that contained large doses of safrole developed permanent liver damage or various types of cancer. While sassafras is no longer used in commercially produced root beer and is sometimes substituted with artificial flavors, natural extracts with the safrole distilled and removed are available.

Traditional method

One traditional recipe for making root beer involves cooking a syrup from molasses and water, letting the syrup cool for three hours, and combining it with the root ingredients (including sassafras root, sassafras bark, and wintergreen). Yeast was added, and the beverage was left to ferment for 12 hours, after which it was strained and rebottled for secondary fermentation. This recipe usually resulted in a beverage of 2% alcohol or less, although the recipe could be modified to produce a more alcoholic beverage.

The History of Root Beer

Text fra Wikipedia

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday – Mason’s Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerMason’s Old Fashioned Root Beer is an American brand of root beer. It is owned by the Monarch Beverage Company of Atlanta, Georgia, but is not widely distributed.

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerThe Monarch Beverage Company was founded in Atlanta in 1965 by Frank Armstrong, an advertising executive who had spent years working with an international soft drink company. Armstrong’s experience opened his eyes to an untapped market of smaller, regional soft drink brands, each of which had a distinct personality and a loyal following. He envisioned a beverage company that would capitalize on this market – and The Monarch Beverage Company was born.

Mason’s Root Beer was first manufactured in 1947 by Mason & Mason, Inc. of Chicago, Illinois. During its early years, Mason’s Root Beer and flavors line were widely distributed in the Midwest as well as some Southern states.

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerIn 1970, the Rheingold Corporation entered the soda pop business with the purchase of Grapette, changing the company’s name to Flavette. The Flavette division subsequently purchased the Dr. Wells soda pop brand and Mason & Mason, Inc. In 1975, Rheingold and its Flavette division were purchased by Pepsi Co, Inc. in a hostile takeover. The Federal Trade Commission felt that PepsiCo owned too many brands and forced it to divest several of its brands. By 1978, Mason’s Root Beer had been acquired by Monarch Beverage Company but was mostly shelved in favor of the higher-volume Dad’s brand of root beer, which Monarch acquired in 1986.

Text from Wikipedia

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Double Seven

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double seven_02Double Seven was an Indian soft drink brand. It was manufactured and marketed by the Indian government after Coca-Cola quit the Indian market in 1977 due to changes in government policies. Double Seven was launched at the annual trade fair at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi as a gift by the then ruling Janata Party.

In 1977, the Morarji Desai government asked Coca-Cola to hand over the controlling stake of its Indian operation to Indian investors as per the provisions of the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act. This would have meant that Coca-Cola might have had to share the secret Coca-Cola formula with its Indian partners. Coca-Cola refused and was asked by the government to cease its operations in India.

double seven_05Developed to fill the void left by Coca-Cola, Double Seven was manufactured and marketed by Modern Food Industries, a government-owned company. The formula for the concentrate of Double Seven was developed at Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore. Despite government backing, Double Seven could not dominate the Indian soft drinks market. The main competitors to Double Seven were Campa Cola, Thums Up, Duke’s, McDowell’s Crush and Double Cola. Double Seven also had a Lemon-lime flavoured soft drink known as Double Seven Tingle.

double seven_04In 1980, Prime Minister Desai lost the support of parliament and resigned, leading to elections that returned Indira Gandhi to power. Double Seven, which was named after the year in which she lost power, lost further share of market as her government was not interested in supporting a product which reminded them of 1977. Modern Food Industries gradually slipped into the red and was taken over by Hindustan Lever Limited in January 2000.

However, Thums Up, which was also launched in 1977 after the departure of Coca-Cola, continued to thrive until its eventual takeover by Coca-Cola.

Text from Wikipedia

The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

A simple recipe for ice coffee found on madogbolig.dk
The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

Here’s a brilliant recipe for the world’s easiest ice coffee with condensed milk.

There is hardly an easier way to make a delicious ice coffee than with condensed milk. The milk gives a nice creamy flavor – like in the types of ice coffee that you buy from Starbucks or Baresso. At the same time, the condensed milk sweetens the coffee nicely and you can choose how sweet you want to make your ice coffee.

Once you’ve found the blend that agrees perfectly with your taste buds, you can make yourself a delicious ice coffee with condensed milk,  at a fraction of what you usually would have to pay at the cafes.

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Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

A 19th century refreshment recipe found on worldturn’udupsidedown
Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down’  writes: This recipe was cooked for the Historical Food Fortnightly. A yearly challenge that encourages bloggers to cook a historical food every two weeks.

Civil War Era Pinappleade recipe

For this challenge I decided to take on a lemonade twist with pineappleade. Pineapples were exotic fruits in the 1800s, mostly grown in Jamaica. They were used for such dishes as ice cream, pudding, pineapple chips, fritters, drinks and marmalade. They were considered a “dessert” fruit and was often paired with sugar. Pineapples, being imports, were not as common as home grown fruits. The first large quantity producing pineapple plantation in Florida was started in 1860 by Captain Benjamin Baker, who was probably accustomed to the enjoyment of them at sea.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kitty Kola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty Kola

Kitty Kola was a cola-flavoured soft drink. It  is produced in Sweden and bottled by Kopparbergs Bryggeri, Sofiero Bryggeri, Fagerdals Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty KolaBryggeri and Fågelfors Bryggeri & Läskedrycksfabrik. The soda was originally English and was introduced in Sweden i 1953. The beverage was also found overseas due to the ease of exportation. It had been seen in specialty markets in the United States and other countries.

This beverage was a light brown with a slight foamy head when poured and is made with several natural juices to which water, sugar, and flavorings have been added. Additional sugar and carbon dioxide are also added to the mixture. It also has added natural flavorings such as lime juice. Caffeine is added as well.

This popular cola came in a 12 ounce bottle as well as larger, 20 ounce bottles and aluminum cans. It was a common drink with older adults, but was more heavily marketed to teens and young adults. One can contains as much caffeine as one cup of coffee.


Kitty Cola now, however, has returned again in a new shape. The new drink is made from apples and cherry beans, and it is the pomologist Kajsa Leander at Berga Bruk in Småland, which is behind the recipe. It is organic and has no added sugar. In addition to the cola, the flavorsinclude Kitty Cool (lemonade) and Kitty Krazy (ginger). The drinks is now available at selected retailers and stores.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty Kola

Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

A grownup picnic refershment found on BBC food
Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

This delicately coloured, refreshing take on the classic gin and tonic makes a perfect picnic tipple.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kooba Cola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaSome things never change. Just as youngsters today do, kids in the 1940′s loved soda pop. Many modern cola drinks flourished during the Depression and war years: Coca-Cola, Pepsi Cola, and Royal Crown Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaCola were all big during the Forties. Other brands were big sellers during the war years but are minor players today; although Moxie was popular enough to become a slang term in the American lexicon during the pre-war period, that soft drink is largely forgotten these days (although it’s still available in the North-eastern U.S.).

And then there was Kooba Cola. Good ol’ Kooba! Cold, refreshing, tasty, and good for you, packed full of Vitamin B! The company was so sure their product would be a hit with kids that they even gave away free samples,

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaWhat’s that you say? You never heard of Kooba Cola? Come on! There were ads for it in lots of comic books: Weird Comics, Mystery Man Comics, Wonderworld Comics…Kooba even sponsored the Blue Beetle radio show!

And that’s where you might start to smell a rat if you’re fairly knowledgeable on the subject of Golden Age Comics. All of the titles I mentioned were published by Fox Publications, one of the more controversial publishers of the era — and The Blue Beetle was a Fox character.

Victor Fox had, at one time, kept the books for Detective Comics which, at that time, was Superman’s publishing Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colacompany. Fox saw the early sales numbers after Supes was first introduced and realized there might be some serious money to be made in the “costumed hero” business. So he quit his job at DC and started his own publishing company. He didn’t keep “in house” artists, but instead farmed out the work to studios.

In the 1940′s comics and soda pop went hand in hand together. We need to remember that “comics shops” didn’t exist back then – hell, there weren’t even 7-11s! Comics were sold at newsstands and “mom and pop” soda Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colashops. As late as the 1970′s you could still buy comics at “soda fountains”. In my hometown we had a downtown soda shop called Cromer’s, which had a huge comics selection — Mom and Pop Cromer never sent comics back to the distributor, so a comic would potentially stay on the rack forever until somebody bought it. So, for example, when I started reading Marvel’s Doctor Strange in early 1976 and came into the story somewhere in Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colathe middle, I pedalled my bike down to Cromer’s in a successful hunt for back issues so I could get a “running start” into the story. Cromers’ was jam-packed with every small item you could think of, very cramped and crowded, but they still kept a small four stool counter and soda fountain. The mirror behind the fountain was festooned with scores of class photos of neighbourhood kids, including yellowed photos going the whole way back to the 1950′s. In fact, the store still had merchandise which went back that far – I once saw a plastic pack of girls’ bobby socks hanging on a peg, twenty years after they’d gone out of style.

Text from: fourcolorglasses.wordpress.com/

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Ski

Ski is a citrus soda made from real orange and lemon juices, manufactured by the Double Cola Company.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

History

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - SkiCombining the powerful tastes of oranges and lemons, Double Cola Company’s citrus drink, Ski, was formulated in 1956. The soda contains natural flavorings to create a soft drink with a strong, natural citrus taste. Ski was trademarked in 1958.

Diet Ski was introduced in 1986 to enhance the sales of regular Ski.

Ten years later, in 1996, Cherry Ski was introduced giving Ski drinkers an even greater citrus drink choice.

In 2009, Ski underwent a package redesign. A new slogan was introduced, “Real Lemon. Real Orange. Real Good.” Along with the new graphics, Diet Ski was reformulated with Splenda. Cherry Ski was re-branded as Ski InfraRED.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Jaffa

Jaffa is a popular carbonated soft drink produced in Finland by Hartwall and in Sweden by Spendrups. Jaffa is usually orange flavoured, however different flavours are sold. Jaffa as a brand is not owned by any specific company, thus there is a range of Jaffa products from various manufacturers.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffa

The original orange flavoured Hartwall Jaffa was introduced in 1949 and the selection has expanded to 11 different flavours since then. Currently Hartwall Jaffa is the best-loved beverage brand in Finland Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffaand the third best-selling soft drink after internationally sold cola beverages such as Coca-Cola.

What do you get when you put stevia, a sweetener used by South American indigenous peoples, fructose and Finland’s favourite soft drink into the same bottle? Fresh, lighter and more natural than before Hartwall Jaffa Super soft drinks!  The new Hartwall Jaffa Super drinks, with their green caps, will be the first stevia-sweetened drinks to be sold in Finland. The new drinks was available in stores in the beginning of December 2013.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffa

Hartwall Jaffa products

Hartwall Jaffa Appelsiini (original orange flavour)
Hartwall Jaffa Appelsiini Light (orange light)
Hartwall Jaffa Ananas Light (pineapple light)
Hartwall Jaffa Greippi (grapefruit)
Hartwall Jaffa Greippi Light (grapefruit)
Hartwall Jaffa Lime-Verigreippi Light (lime & red grapefruit light)
Hartwall Jaffa Palma (lemon)
Hartwall Jaffa Veriappelsiini (blood orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Super Veriappelsiini (Stevia sweetened blood orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Super Marja (Stevia sweetened berry)
Hartwall Jaffa Jouluomena (Christmas apple, seasonal product)
Hartwall Jaffa Napapiiri (Karpalo [cranberry], seasonal product)
Hartwall Jaffa Vihreä Mandariini (mandarin orange & kiwi)
Hartwall Jaffa Musta Appelsiini (black orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Pomelo (pomelo fruit)

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Dr Brown’s

Dr Brown's_06Dr. Brown’s is a brand of soft drink made by J & R Bottling. It is popular in the New York City region and South Florida, but it can also be found in Jewish delicatessens and upscale supermarkets around the United States. Slogans for the products have included: “Imported From the Old Neighborhood” and “Taste of the Town.”

Dr. Brown’s was created in 1869 and was commonly sold in New York delicatessens and by soda salesmen who sold the product from door to door in Jewish neighborhoods. According to former marketing director, Harry Gold, a Dr Brown's_02New York doctor used celery seeds and sugar to invent the cream soda and celery tonic now known as Cel-Ray, which was advertised as a “pure beverage for the nerves.”

In the early 1930s, before Coca-Cola received kosher certification, many Jewish people drank Cel-Ray soda as well as the other flavored soda that had been created by Dr. Brown. In the last 25 years, the cans were redesigned by Herb Lubalin. Each of the six Dr. Brown’s flavors is packaged with a New York vignette taken from old prints, to emphasize the brand’s origins in 1800s New York.

In 2013, J & R Bottling transferred the bottling rights to LA Bottleworks. The bottling of the product will continue to be produced at the same facility. As of 2014, Dr Brown’s is produced by PepsiCo in their New York City bottling plant. Dr. Brown’s is owned by the Honickman Beverage Group

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Dr Brown's_05Dr. Brown’s varieties include: cream soda (regular and diet), black cherry soda (regular and diet), orange soda, ginger ale, root beer, and Cel-Ray (celery-flavored soda).

Dr. Brown’s soda is typically sold in 12-ounce cans and in one-liter and plastic bottles as well as two-liters in Black Cherry, Cream, and Root Beer flavors. Dr. Brown’s soda is also available in a 6-pack of 12-ounce glass bottles.

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Text from Wikipedia