The History of Root Beer

The History of Root Beer

Smilax ornata (sarsaparilla)Root beer is a sweet soda traditionally made using the sassafras tree Sassafras albidum (sassafras) or the vine Smilax ornata (sarsaparilla) as the primary flavor. Root beer may be alcoholic or non-alcoholic, come naturally free of caffeine or have caffeine added, and carbonated or non-carbonated. It usually has a thick, foamy head when poured. Modern, commercially produced root beer is generally sweet, foamy, carbonated, nonalcoholic, and flavoured using artificial sassafras flavouring. Sassafras root is still used to flavor traditional root beer, but since sassafras was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration due to the controversially claimed carcinogenicity of its constituent safrole, most commercial recipes do not contain sassafras. Some commercial root beers do use a safrole-free sassafras extract.

History

Sassafras albidum (sassafras)Sassafras root beverages were made by indigenous peoples of the Americas for culinary and medicinal reasons before the arrival of Europeans in North America, but European culinary techniques have been applied to making traditional sassafras-based beverages similar to root beer since the 16th century. Root beer was sold in confectionery stores since the 1840s, and written recipes for root beer have been documented since the 1860s. It possibly was combined with soda as early as the 1850s, and root beer sold in stores was most often sold as a syrup rather than a ready-made beverage. The tradition of brewing root beer is thought to have evolved out of other small beer traditions that produced fermented drinks with very low alcohol content that were thought to be healthier to drink than possibly tainted local sources of drinking water, and enhanced by the medicinal and nutritional qualities of the ingredients used. Beyond its aromatic qualities, the medicinal benefits of sassafras were well known to both Native Americans and Europeans, and druggists began marketing root beer for its medicinal qualities.

The History of Root Beer

Pharmacist Charles Elmer Hires was the first to successfully market a commercial brand of root beer. Hires developed his root tea made from sassafras in 1875, debuted a commercial version of root beer at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876, and began selling his extract. Hires was a teetotaler who wanted to call the beverage “root tea”. However, his desire to market the product to Pennsylvania coal miners caused him to call his product “root beer”, instead. In 1886, Hires began to bottle a beverage made from his famous extract. By 1893, root beer was distributed widely across the United States. Non-alcoholic versions of root beer became commercially successful, especially during Prohibition.

The History of Root BeerNot all traditional or commercial root beers were sassafras-based. One of Hires’s early competitors was Barq’s, which began selling its sarsaparilla-based root beer in 1898 and was labeled simply as “Barq’s”. In 1919, Roy Allen opened his root-beer stand in Lodi, California, which led to the development of A&W Root Beer. One of Allen’s innovations was that he served his homemade root beer in cold, frosty mugs. IBC Root Beer is another brand of commercially produced root beer that emerged during this period and is still well-known today.

The History of Root Beer

Safrole, the aromatic oil found in sassafras roots and bark that gave traditional root beer its distinctive flavour, was banned for commercially mass-produced foods and drugs by the FDA in 1960. Laboratory animals that were given oral doses of sassafras tea or sassafras oil that contained large doses of safrole developed permanent liver damage or various types of cancer. While sassafras is no longer used in commercially produced root beer and is sometimes substituted with artificial flavors, natural extracts with the safrole distilled and removed are available.

Traditional method

One traditional recipe for making root beer involves cooking a syrup from molasses and water, letting the syrup cool for three hours, and combining it with the root ingredients (including sassafras root, sassafras bark, and wintergreen). Yeast was added, and the beverage was left to ferment for 12 hours, after which it was strained and rebottled for secondary fermentation. This recipe usually resulted in a beverage of 2% alcohol or less, although the recipe could be modified to produce a more alcoholic beverage.

The History of Root Beer

Text fra Wikipedia

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday – Mason’s Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerMason’s Old Fashioned Root Beer is an American brand of root beer. It is owned by the Monarch Beverage Company of Atlanta, Georgia, but is not widely distributed.

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerThe Monarch Beverage Company was founded in Atlanta in 1965 by Frank Armstrong, an advertising executive who had spent years working with an international soft drink company. Armstrong’s experience opened his eyes to an untapped market of smaller, regional soft drink brands, each of which had a distinct personality and a loyal following. He envisioned a beverage company that would capitalize on this market – and The Monarch Beverage Company was born.

Mason’s Root Beer was first manufactured in 1947 by Mason & Mason, Inc. of Chicago, Illinois. During its early years, Mason’s Root Beer and flavors line were widely distributed in the Midwest as well as some Southern states.

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root Beer

Soda & Soft DrinkSaturday - Mason's Old Fashioned Root BeerIn 1970, the Rheingold Corporation entered the soda pop business with the purchase of Grapette, changing the company’s name to Flavette. The Flavette division subsequently purchased the Dr. Wells soda pop brand and Mason & Mason, Inc. In 1975, Rheingold and its Flavette division were purchased by Pepsi Co, Inc. in a hostile takeover. The Federal Trade Commission felt that PepsiCo owned too many brands and forced it to divest several of its brands. By 1978, Mason’s Root Beer had been acquired by Monarch Beverage Company but was mostly shelved in favor of the higher-volume Dad’s brand of root beer, which Monarch acquired in 1986.

Text from Wikipedia

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Double Seven

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double seven_02Double Seven was an Indian soft drink brand. It was manufactured and marketed by the Indian government after Coca-Cola quit the Indian market in 1977 due to changes in government policies. Double Seven was launched at the annual trade fair at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi as a gift by the then ruling Janata Party.

In 1977, the Morarji Desai government asked Coca-Cola to hand over the controlling stake of its Indian operation to Indian investors as per the provisions of the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act. This would have meant that Coca-Cola might have had to share the secret Coca-Cola formula with its Indian partners. Coca-Cola refused and was asked by the government to cease its operations in India.

double seven_05Developed to fill the void left by Coca-Cola, Double Seven was manufactured and marketed by Modern Food Industries, a government-owned company. The formula for the concentrate of Double Seven was developed at Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore. Despite government backing, Double Seven could not dominate the Indian soft drinks market. The main competitors to Double Seven were Campa Cola, Thums Up, Duke’s, McDowell’s Crush and Double Cola. Double Seven also had a Lemon-lime flavoured soft drink known as Double Seven Tingle.

double seven_04In 1980, Prime Minister Desai lost the support of parliament and resigned, leading to elections that returned Indira Gandhi to power. Double Seven, which was named after the year in which she lost power, lost further share of market as her government was not interested in supporting a product which reminded them of 1977. Modern Food Industries gradually slipped into the red and was taken over by Hindustan Lever Limited in January 2000.

However, Thums Up, which was also launched in 1977 after the departure of Coca-Cola, continued to thrive until its eventual takeover by Coca-Cola.

Text from Wikipedia

The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

A simple recipe for ice coffee found on madogbolig.dk
The World’s Easiest Ice Coffee / Verdens Nemmeste Iskaffe

Here’s a brilliant recipe for the world’s easiest ice coffee with condensed milk.

There is hardly an easier way to make a delicious ice coffee than with condensed milk. The milk gives a nice creamy flavor – like in the types of ice coffee that you buy from Starbucks or Baresso. At the same time, the condensed milk sweetens the coffee nicely and you can choose how sweet you want to make your ice coffee.

Once you’ve found the blend that agrees perfectly with your taste buds, you can make yourself a delicious ice coffee with condensed milk,  at a fraction of what you usually would have to pay at the cafes.

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Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

A 19th century refreshment recipe found on worldturn’udupsidedown
Civil War Era Pinappleade / Ananasade fra Tiden Rundt den Amerikanske Borgerkrigen

Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down’  writes: This recipe was cooked for the Historical Food Fortnightly. A yearly challenge that encourages bloggers to cook a historical food every two weeks.

Civil War Era Pinappleade recipe

For this challenge I decided to take on a lemonade twist with pineappleade. Pineapples were exotic fruits in the 1800s, mostly grown in Jamaica. They were used for such dishes as ice cream, pudding, pineapple chips, fritters, drinks and marmalade. They were considered a “dessert” fruit and was often paired with sugar. Pineapples, being imports, were not as common as home grown fruits. The first large quantity producing pineapple plantation in Florida was started in 1860 by Captain Benjamin Baker, who was probably accustomed to the enjoyment of them at sea.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kitty Kola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty Kola

Kitty Kola was a cola-flavoured soft drink. It  is produced in Sweden and bottled by Kopparbergs Bryggeri, Sofiero Bryggeri, Fagerdals Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty KolaBryggeri and Fågelfors Bryggeri & Läskedrycksfabrik. The soda was originally English and was introduced in Sweden i 1953. The beverage was also found overseas due to the ease of exportation. It had been seen in specialty markets in the United States and other countries.

This beverage was a light brown with a slight foamy head when poured and is made with several natural juices to which water, sugar, and flavorings have been added. Additional sugar and carbon dioxide are also added to the mixture. It also has added natural flavorings such as lime juice. Caffeine is added as well.

This popular cola came in a 12 ounce bottle as well as larger, 20 ounce bottles and aluminum cans. It was a common drink with older adults, but was more heavily marketed to teens and young adults. One can contains as much caffeine as one cup of coffee.


Kitty Cola now, however, has returned again in a new shape. The new drink is made from apples and cherry beans, and it is the pomologist Kajsa Leander at Berga Bruk in Småland, which is behind the recipe. It is organic and has no added sugar. In addition to the cola, the flavorsinclude Kitty Cool (lemonade) and Kitty Krazy (ginger). The drinks is now available at selected retailers and stores.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kitty Kola

Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

A grownup picnic refershment found on BBC food
Elderflower & Cucumber Gin & Tonics / Hylleblomst & Agurk Gin & Tonics

This delicately coloured, refreshing take on the classic gin and tonic makes a perfect picnic tipple.

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Kooba Cola

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaSome things never change. Just as youngsters today do, kids in the 1940′s loved soda pop. Many modern cola drinks flourished during the Depression and war years: Coca-Cola, Pepsi Cola, and Royal Crown Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaCola were all big during the Forties. Other brands were big sellers during the war years but are minor players today; although Moxie was popular enough to become a slang term in the American lexicon during the pre-war period, that soft drink is largely forgotten these days (although it’s still available in the North-eastern U.S.).

And then there was Kooba Cola. Good ol’ Kooba! Cold, refreshing, tasty, and good for you, packed full of Vitamin B! The company was so sure their product would be a hit with kids that they even gave away free samples,

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba ColaWhat’s that you say? You never heard of Kooba Cola? Come on! There were ads for it in lots of comic books: Weird Comics, Mystery Man Comics, Wonderworld Comics…Kooba even sponsored the Blue Beetle radio show!

And that’s where you might start to smell a rat if you’re fairly knowledgeable on the subject of Golden Age Comics. All of the titles I mentioned were published by Fox Publications, one of the more controversial publishers of the era — and The Blue Beetle was a Fox character.

Victor Fox had, at one time, kept the books for Detective Comics which, at that time, was Superman’s publishing Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colacompany. Fox saw the early sales numbers after Supes was first introduced and realized there might be some serious money to be made in the “costumed hero” business. So he quit his job at DC and started his own publishing company. He didn’t keep “in house” artists, but instead farmed out the work to studios.

In the 1940′s comics and soda pop went hand in hand together. We need to remember that “comics shops” didn’t exist back then – hell, there weren’t even 7-11s! Comics were sold at newsstands and “mom and pop” soda Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colashops. As late as the 1970′s you could still buy comics at “soda fountains”. In my hometown we had a downtown soda shop called Cromer’s, which had a huge comics selection — Mom and Pop Cromer never sent comics back to the distributor, so a comic would potentially stay on the rack forever until somebody bought it. So, for example, when I started reading Marvel’s Doctor Strange in early 1976 and came into the story somewhere in Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Kooba Colathe middle, I pedalled my bike down to Cromer’s in a successful hunt for back issues so I could get a “running start” into the story. Cromers’ was jam-packed with every small item you could think of, very cramped and crowded, but they still kept a small four stool counter and soda fountain. The mirror behind the fountain was festooned with scores of class photos of neighbourhood kids, including yellowed photos going the whole way back to the 1950′s. In fact, the store still had merchandise which went back that far – I once saw a plastic pack of girls’ bobby socks hanging on a peg, twenty years after they’d gone out of style.

Text from: fourcolorglasses.wordpress.com/

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Ski

Ski is a citrus soda made from real orange and lemon juices, manufactured by the Double Cola Company.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

History

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - SkiCombining the powerful tastes of oranges and lemons, Double Cola Company’s citrus drink, Ski, was formulated in 1956. The soda contains natural flavorings to create a soft drink with a strong, natural citrus taste. Ski was trademarked in 1958.

Diet Ski was introduced in 1986 to enhance the sales of regular Ski.

Ten years later, in 1996, Cherry Ski was introduced giving Ski drinkers an even greater citrus drink choice.

In 2009, Ski underwent a package redesign. A new slogan was introduced, “Real Lemon. Real Orange. Real Good.” Along with the new graphics, Diet Ski was reformulated with Splenda. Cherry Ski was re-branded as Ski InfraRED.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Ski

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Jaffa

Jaffa is a popular carbonated soft drink produced in Finland by Hartwall and in Sweden by Spendrups. Jaffa is usually orange flavoured, however different flavours are sold. Jaffa as a brand is not owned by any specific company, thus there is a range of Jaffa products from various manufacturers.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffa

The original orange flavoured Hartwall Jaffa was introduced in 1949 and the selection has expanded to 11 different flavours since then. Currently Hartwall Jaffa is the best-loved beverage brand in Finland Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffaand the third best-selling soft drink after internationally sold cola beverages such as Coca-Cola.

What do you get when you put stevia, a sweetener used by South American indigenous peoples, fructose and Finland’s favourite soft drink into the same bottle? Fresh, lighter and more natural than before Hartwall Jaffa Super soft drinks!  The new Hartwall Jaffa Super drinks, with their green caps, will be the first stevia-sweetened drinks to be sold in Finland. The new drinks was available in stores in the beginning of December 2013.

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday - Jaffa

Hartwall Jaffa products

Hartwall Jaffa Appelsiini (original orange flavour)
Hartwall Jaffa Appelsiini Light (orange light)
Hartwall Jaffa Ananas Light (pineapple light)
Hartwall Jaffa Greippi (grapefruit)
Hartwall Jaffa Greippi Light (grapefruit)
Hartwall Jaffa Lime-Verigreippi Light (lime & red grapefruit light)
Hartwall Jaffa Palma (lemon)
Hartwall Jaffa Veriappelsiini (blood orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Super Veriappelsiini (Stevia sweetened blood orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Super Marja (Stevia sweetened berry)
Hartwall Jaffa Jouluomena (Christmas apple, seasonal product)
Hartwall Jaffa Napapiiri (Karpalo [cranberry], seasonal product)
Hartwall Jaffa Vihreä Mandariini (mandarin orange & kiwi)
Hartwall Jaffa Musta Appelsiini (black orange)
Hartwall Jaffa Pomelo (pomelo fruit)

Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Dr Brown’s

Dr Brown's_06Dr. Brown’s is a brand of soft drink made by J & R Bottling. It is popular in the New York City region and South Florida, but it can also be found in Jewish delicatessens and upscale supermarkets around the United States. Slogans for the products have included: “Imported From the Old Neighborhood” and “Taste of the Town.”

Dr. Brown’s was created in 1869 and was commonly sold in New York delicatessens and by soda salesmen who sold the product from door to door in Jewish neighborhoods. According to former marketing director, Harry Gold, a Dr Brown's_02New York doctor used celery seeds and sugar to invent the cream soda and celery tonic now known as Cel-Ray, which was advertised as a “pure beverage for the nerves.”

In the early 1930s, before Coca-Cola received kosher certification, many Jewish people drank Cel-Ray soda as well as the other flavored soda that had been created by Dr. Brown. In the last 25 years, the cans were redesigned by Herb Lubalin. Each of the six Dr. Brown’s flavors is packaged with a New York vignette taken from old prints, to emphasize the brand’s origins in 1800s New York.

In 2013, J & R Bottling transferred the bottling rights to LA Bottleworks. The bottling of the product will continue to be produced at the same facility. As of 2014, Dr Brown’s is produced by PepsiCo in their New York City bottling plant. Dr. Brown’s is owned by the Honickman Beverage Group

Dr Brown's_01

Dr Brown's_05Dr. Brown’s varieties include: cream soda (regular and diet), black cherry soda (regular and diet), orange soda, ginger ale, root beer, and Cel-Ray (celery-flavored soda).

Dr. Brown’s soda is typically sold in 12-ounce cans and in one-liter and plastic bottles as well as two-liters in Black Cherry, Cream, and Root Beer flavors. Dr. Brown’s soda is also available in a 6-pack of 12-ounce glass bottles.

Dr Brown's_04

Text from Wikipedia

Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

An ice coffee recipe found in “The Story of Coffee and How To Make It” published by The Cheek-Neal Coffee Co in 1925
Russian Coffee Frappé / Russisk Kaffe Frappé

Wikipedia: Frappé coffee (also Greek frappé or café frappé Greek: φραπές, frapés) is a Greek foam-covered iced coffee drink made from instant coffee (generally, spray-dried). Accidentally invented by a Nescafe representative named Dimitris Vakondios in 1957 in the city of Thessaloniki, it is now the most popular coffee among Greek youth and foreign tourists. It is popular in Greece, and Cyprus, especially during the summer, but has now spread to other countries. The word frappé is French and comes from the verb frapper which means to ‘strike’; in this context, however, in French, when describing a drink, the word frappé means chilled, as with ice cubes in a shaker. The frappé has become a hallmark of post-war outdoor Greek coffee culture.

Since this Russian recipe made with real brewed coffee is from 1925
I guess Mr Nescafe Representative must have simply pretended
to invent the frappé coffee after having stolen it from the Russians
in order to push his useless instant coffee

Ted
Winking smile

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Soda & Soft Drink Saturday – Jolly Cola – An Original Danish Soft Drink

Jolly Cola_01

Jolly Cola is an original Danish soft drink dating back to 1959. Today, Jolly Cola is produced by the Danish brewery ‘Vestfyen’, which also produces Jolly Light, the sports drink Jolly Time and Jolly Orange. Up until the 1980s, Jolly Cola had a market share of about 40% of the Danish cola market. This was extraordinary, as Denmark is the only country in the world, where another cola than the original Coca Cola has had a larger market share. Jolly Cola is probably most famous for its slogan “Say Jolly to your cola!”, but having reached its 50th birthday, this slogan will be followed by “Free your taste”.

The history of Jolly Cola

Jolly Cola_06Following WW2, many countries in the world viewed Coca Cola as synonymous with the US and an American life-style, and as the US developed and increased its influence on society, so did Coca Cola. In the meantime, the Danish population still had to wait until 1959, before they could buy a bottle of Coca Cola. Admittedly, Coca Cola had been marketed with moderate success from the middle of the 1930s, but then came a war, followed by rationing of sugar and finally a special tax on cola, which made the soft drink just as expensive as a beer, and therefore kept it out of the Danish market. The taxation came as a result of skilled lobbyism, carried out by breweries and producers of mineral water – and it worked as intended.

Jolly Cola_05Following the implementation of the tax in 1953, only 10,000 litres of cola soft drinks were sold in Denmark a year, primarily produced by minor Danish producers of mineral water, avoiding the competition from the American giant. However, the opposition against the taxation grew, and by the end of the 1950s it was only the communists and conservative powers in Danish politics, which had close connections to the brewing industry, that wanted a prohibitive surtax on what a member of the Danish Communist Party called “a bitter cup”

When the Danish producers finally realised that they could not keep Coca Cola out of the Danish market anymore, they quickly changed their strategy. In January 1959 18 breweries and producers of mineral water went together to form ‘Dansk Coladrik A/S’. This initiative was instigated by Carlsberg and Tuborg so as to produce an original Danish cola that was to be sold nationwide. The soft drink was named Jolly Cola and was an all-out copy product. This regarded not only the taste, but also the organisation behind the product, which completely resembled Coca Cola, especially in terms of having a strong and centralised control of quality and marketing, combined with local bottling departments.

Jolly Cola_02

Suddenly, the strategy seemed to be that if you could not get rid of Coca Cola, the least you could do was to ensure that the Danish population drank Danish produced cola. To a great extent, this was a success, and when the taxation was removed and ‘the great Danish cola war’ broke out in July 1959, Jolly Cola actually conquered a significant part of the new market. In July 1959 alone, nine million bottles of Jolly Cola were sold, compared to five million bottles of Coca Cola.

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This was an incredible number compared to an annual sale of 40 to 50,000 bottles in 1958. Naturally, the sheer interest of the news explains a part of the increased sale, but so does the summer of 1959, which was exceptionally good. Nevertheless, when the market finally stabilised, roughly every fifth sold soft drink in Denmark was a cola, and approximately 40% was Jolly Cola. Jolly Cola maintained this market share up until the 1980s.

Jolly Cola_07There are several explanations for Jolly Cola’s success. However, the most important one is that ‘Dansk Coladrik’ could make use of the brewing industry’s comprehensive network, distributing system and knowledge of the Danish market. For example, it is a known fact the Danish breweries supplied the restaurants and pubs. Another reason is that it was only possible to buy Coca Cola in Copenhagen and a few larger cities in Jutland in the early years of the hectic ‘cola war’. Hence, it was not until the 1960s that it was possible to buy Coca Cola nationwide.

Jolly Cola_04This ensured that Jolly Cola was a well-established product in many places, when Coca Cola finally ventured into the market. Thirdly, it was due to great marketing. Dansk Coladrik A/S had e.g. tapped their cola in regular soft drink bottles. This made it easier for the retail industry to administer the returnable bottle system, but it also made it possible to launch Jolly Cola as “The Big Cola” (a slogan that not by coincidence resembled Pepsi’s success-slogan about the big 12 ounce bottle from the 1930s USA). A

A Danish soft drink bottle contained exactly 25 cl, whereas the characteristic ‘chubby’ Coca Cola bottle only contained 19 cl. The argument about value for your money was important in a time where a soft drink was considered to be a luxury product. (The story of Jolly Cola is based on the work of Klaus Petersen and Niels Arne Sørensen from the Institute of History, Culture and Society).

Today’s Jolly

Jolly Cola_08In the 1980s Jolly Cola still had around 60% of the Danish cola market, but in the 1990s they experienced a decrease in sales. In 1999 the failing sales numbers forced the Co-operative Wholesale Society (FDB) to remove Jolly Cola from its shelves. Following this, Jolly Cola only made up 6% of the total Danish soft drink market in 2002, which was again reduced to 2% in 2003. In the same year, a trial between the brewery ‘Vestfyen’ and the association of Danish breweries almost compromised Jolly Cola’s existence. ‘Vestfyen’ believed that the association of Danish breweries would rather market Pepsi Cola at the expense of Jolly Cola. In September 2003, however, ‘Vestfyen’ took over all stocks dealing with the struggling soft drink so as to engage in a turn-around of the product. This became an immense success, and in 2004 Jolly Cola actually made up 25% of Coop Denmark’s cola sales.

You can see two Jolly Cola commercials with
supermodel Tina Kjær here and here

Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here’s How to Cool off With Coffee

Recipes from an coffee ad published by
The Pan-American Coffee Bureau in 1956

1956_Pan-American coffee Bureau_post

The Pan-American Coffee Bureau kindly brings you advice on both how to brew your ice coffee and how to enjoy it.

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Dandy Shandy / Klassisk Shandy

A refreshing drink recipe found on bhg.com
Dandy Shandy_post

Shandy is beer mixed with a soft drink, such as carbonated lemonade, ginger beer, ginger ale, apple juice, or orange juice. The proportions of the two ingredients are adjusted to taste, usually half-and-half. Non-alcoholic shandies are known as “rock shandies”. Shandies are more popular in western Europe, particlarly in Britain, than other parts of the world.

In some jurisdictions, the low alcohol content of shandies makes them exempt from laws governing the sale of alcoholic beverages.

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