Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

A spicy dinner recipe found in “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by Dairy Australia
Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

Thai cuisine (Thai: อาหารไทย, rtgs: Ahan Thai, pronounced [ʔāː.hǎːn tʰāj]) is the national cuisine of Thailand. Balance, detail, and variety are of paramount significance to Thai chefs.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating “intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor”, as well as care being given to the food’s appearance, smell and context. Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about “the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish”.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge asian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Advertisements

Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

A dinner recipe found in “Cooking for a Man”
published by House of Heublein in 1953
Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

Since it is my birthday today I thought it only right to post one of my
favourite dishes. I love curry and I love shellfish. And I even found
that recipe in a book that was published the year I was born. So now
those of you with a head for numbers can find out how old I am

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

A dinner recipe found in “Better Homes and Gardens
Recipe Card Library” published in 1978
Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

Compared to most westernized Indian recipes this dish seems to be rather potent. Usually recipes like this goes for 1 – 2 teaspoons of curry powder, this one goes for 2 – 3 tablespoons.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

A mild Indian curry recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987
Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

Roganjhost are among the dishes you will find on the menu all over India. These tender lamb cubes in a creamy, aromatic sauce, lightly spiced and with just a hint of chili, is a good example that curries need not be burning hot to be delicious.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Massaman Curry / Massaman Karri

A classic Thai recipe found on goodtoknow.co.ukMassaman curry_goodtoknow_post

This classic, spicy Thai massaman curry recipe is packed full of delicious flavour. This traditional Thai curry is made with coconut milk, massaman curry paste and tamarind, and has potatoes cooked with the beef to make this a hearty warming supper. Chopped peanuts give a nice crunch too.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Curry Mussels / Blåskjell i Karri

A hot shelfish recipe found in “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance)
published in 1991

blåskjell i karri_post_thumb[2]

Nordic cookbook history was written in 1974. That year a bunch of foodie friends published a cookbook that would become one of Scandinavia’s most popular, Carl Butler’s Cookbook. With folded corners, patches of pie dough, tomato and French mustard and an unmistakable scent of herbal spices and garlic it can be found in hundreds of thousands of Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian homes. The book put for the first time coq au vin, moussaka and paté on our tables.

For all Scandinavians who like me love this cook book it took 17 years before we could hurry to the book shops to buy the continuance. It was simply called “Carl Butlers Kokebok – Fortsettelsen” (Carl Butler’s Cook Book – The Continuance). This recipe is from that book – Ted

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor