Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

A classic North Indian curry found in “The love of Cooking”
by Sonia Allison published in 1972

Gosht Takhari – Indian Beef Curry / Indisk Karrirett med Oksekjøtt

Chicken karahi, also known as gosht takhahi (when prepared with beef instead of chicken) is a Pakistani and North Indian dish noted for its spicy taste. The Pakistani version does not have capsicum or onions whereas the North Indian version often uses capsicum. The dish is prepared in a karahi (wok). It can take between 30 to 50 minutes to prepare and cook the dish and can be stored for later consumption. It can be served with naan, roti or rice. This dish is one the hallmarks of what Indian or Pakistani cuisine is.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Advertisements

Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

A classic Victorian breakfast recipe found on CookIt!
Victorian Kedgeree / Viktoriansk Kedgeree

Kedgeree originated amongst the British colonials in India and was introduced to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times. It is rarely eaten for breakfast these days, but is still very popular for lunch or supper.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge victorian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

A spicy dinner recipe found in “Healthy Recipes with Dairy Food” a free E-book published by Dairy Australia
Thai Chicken and Cashew Yellow Curry / Gul Thaikarri med Kylling og Cashewnøtter

Thai cuisine (Thai: อาหารไทย, rtgs: Ahan Thai, pronounced [ʔāː.hǎːn tʰāj]) is the national cuisine of Thailand. Balance, detail, and variety are of paramount significance to Thai chefs.

Thai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter, and spicy. Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating “intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor”, as well as care being given to the food’s appearance, smell and context. Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about “the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish”.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge asian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

A dinner recipe found in “Cooking for a Man”
published by House of Heublein in 1953
Shrimp Curry / Rekekarri

Since it is my birthday today I thought it only right to post one of my
favourite dishes. I love curry and I love shellfish. And I even found
that recipe in a book that was published the year I was born. So now
those of you with a head for numbers can find out how old I am

Ted
Winking smile

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A dinner recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon”
publisert av Alaska Packers Association in 1900

Salmon Curry / Laksekarri

A curry dish with a surprisingly copious use of curry powder the age of the book taken under consideration. In other words, a rather hot curry seen with Western eyes – Ted

000_england_recipe_marker_nyill000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

A dinner recipe found in “Better Homes and Gardens
Recipe Card Library” published in 1978
Bombay Turkey / Bombay Kalkun

Compared to most westernized Indian recipes this dish seems to be rather potent. Usually recipes like this goes for 1 – 2 teaspoons of curry powder, this one goes for 2 – 3 tablespoons.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

A mild Indian curry recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987
Roganjhost – Mild Lamb Curry / Mild Lammekarri

Roganjhost are among the dishes you will find on the menu all over India. These tender lamb cubes in a creamy, aromatic sauce, lightly spiced and with just a hint of chili, is a good example that curries need not be burning hot to be delicious.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge indian speciality000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

A spicy curry dish recipe from the Victorian era
found at cookit.e2bn.org
Baronet’s Curry / Baronettens Karri

The first English curry house opened in London as early as in 1811 and towards the beginning of the Victorian era (she was born in 1819) exotic spices were getting more and more available. Cook books which were published by the mid 1800s featured many types of curry recipes, and towards the end of 1870 dry spices become so cheap that even farmers with a limited income could indulge in a curry dish from time to time.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge victorian000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

A spicy Jamaican curry recipe found on foodandwine.com
Jamaican Chicken and Potato Curry / Jamaicanske Kylling Og Potet Karri

Jamaican curry powder is typically a blend of turmeric, cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, anise seeds, allspice and fenugreek. This flavorful chicken dish requires little hands-on prep time.

000_england_recipe_marker_nytraditional badge ethnic speciality_flat000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

Lamb Curry / Lam i Karri

An Anglo-Indian recipe found in “Berømte Retter” (Famous Dishes) published by Ernst G Mortensens Forlag in 1970 Lamb Curry post_ill

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatCurry powder consists of a mixture of at least 7-8 different kinds of spices and plants. It originates from India, where housewives still mixes their own curry adapted to their family’s taste. Curry from the Madras area is considered to be much sharper (hotter) in flavor than the one from North India. traditional badge british_flatDuring their Indian colonial times the British learned to appreciate curry, and when the officers and soldiers came back to England, they had developed a taste for these spicy dishes and brought them thus into the English kitchen.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor

Fish in Coconut Curry / Fisk i Kokoskarri (Mtuzi wa Samaki)

A Tanzanian curry recipe found on myrecipes.com
Fish in Coconut Curry (Mtuzi wa Samaki)_myrecipes_post

Tanzania sits at a crossroads in the spice trade routes from India. That’s why Indian spices ended up in so many Tanzanian dishes like this fish curry. The dish originated in Zanzibar but is now enjoyed all over the eastern coast of Africa. Coconut milk enriches the curry and gives it a tropical flavor. Serve over boiled yuca, potatoes, or rice.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor