Vasalopp Cookies / Vasaloppkjeks

A Swedish classic found on alleoppskrifter.no
Vasalopp Cookies / Vasaloppkjeks

Vasaloppet (Swedish for ‘The Vasa Race’) is an annual long-distance cross-country ski race held on the first Sunday of March. The 90 km (56 miles) course starts in the village of Sälen and ends in the town of Mora in northwestern Dalarna, Sweden. It is the oldest and longest cross-country ski race in the world, as well as the race with the highest number of skiers.

The race was inspired by a notable journey made by King Gustav Vasa when he fleeing from Christian II’s soldiers in 1520. The modern competition started in 1922 and it has been a part of the Worldrace events since 1978.

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Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

A classic Norwegian  biscuit recipe  found in “Den Store Bakeboken” (The Big Baking Book) published Schibstedt in 1978Norwegian Wheat Biscuits / Hvetekjeks

Biscuits, whether made with rye, oats or wheat, are very popular
in Norway. Any biscuit with good butter and Norwegian goat cheese
will bring good childhood memories for most of us. At least for me

Ted
Winking smile

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Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

A classic Scottish biscuit recipe found on allrecipes.com
Empire Biscuits / Empir Kjeks

This shortbread cookie is a traditional Scottish recipe. These are round cookies sandwiched with jam and topped off with a delicious icing and a cherry.

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Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

A classic Norwegian biscuit  recipe found on
furkunnjmat.no via alleoppskrifter.no
Grandma’s Oat Biscuits / Bestemors Havrekjeks

Oat biscuits have been staple food in Norway for ages and someone’s granny obviously made some pretty nice ones as this recipe ended up on one of Norway’s most popular recipe sites – Ted

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18th Century Ship’s Bisket / 1800talls Skipskjeks

Authentic ships bisket recipe found on savouringthepast.net
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Jas Townsend who runs savouringthepast.net writes: This Ship’s Bisket is known by many names. Most of the time it was called just bisket, sometimes it was called hard bisket or brown bisket, sea bisket and ship’s bread. Now many today might want to call it hard tack, but hard tack is really a 19th century term that was popularized during the American civil war.

These 18th century biskets are not like today’s buttery flaky version that we serve along with sausage gravy for breakfast. These biskets were not made to be enjoyed; they were made out of necessity.

sailors eating

Ship’s captains faced a continual challenge of having enough food on board to feed a large crew for a long journey. Food spoilage was really his greatest concern. Fresh bread rapidly became moldy on long trips and stored flour would go rancid and bug ridden, so hard bisket was really born out of necessity.

It was a means of food preservation. If it was prepared and stored properly it would last for a year or more. In addition to preservation, the bisket form also helped in portability and in dividing the rations when it came time. Soldiers and sailors typically got one pound of bread a day and biskets were usually about four ounces so when it came time to distribute them, each sailor or soldier would get four biskets.

Biskets from London were considered to be the highest quality. They were the most resistant to mold and insects. They were really the standard by which all the other bisket maker’s aspired to, but not all biskets were the same quality.

Old-Fashioned Gingersnaps / Gammeldagse Ingefærkjeks

An old spicy cookie recipe found on bhg.com
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Gingersnaps, also called ginger biscuits, are a type of cookie. The name comes from the fact these cookies traditionally are very crispy and make a snapping sound when eaten. Gingersnaps are a derivation of gingerbread and were invented hundreds of years ago. People in colonial times enjoyed these cookies, both in European countries and in America.

Origins

Ginger is derived from the ginger root and is native to parts of South Asia; historians believe it was first cultivated in India. Ginger was prized for its valuable effects on health and imported for its medicinal uses before it was utilized for cooking purposes. Ginger found its way to ancient Rome, then to Africa and the Caribbean. In medieval times, ginger was imported to Europe in preserved form to be used in baking treats such as cakes and cookies.

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Crispy Cheese Biscuits / Sprø Ostekjeks

A sharp tasty biscuit recipe found on tine.no
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These biscuits are a natural part of any cheese party and they tastes delicious with salads and soup. With both matured edam and cayenne they have a sharp and delicious taste.

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Easter Biscuits / Påskekjeks

A delicious biscuit recipe found in
“Robert Carrier’s Kitchen Cook Book”
published in 1980

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Afternoon Tea Spiced Biscuits / Krydret Ettermiddagste Kjeks

A classic afternoontea recipe found on realfood.tesco.comAfternoon tea spiced tea biscuits_realfood-tesco_post

Afternoon tea is a light meal typically eaten between 4 pm and 6 pm. Observance of the custom originated amongst the wealthy classes in England in the 1840s. Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford, is widely credited as transforming afternoon tea in England into a late-afternoon meal whilst visiting Belvoir Castle. By the end of the nineteenth century, afternoon tea developed to its current form and was observed by both the upper and middle classes. It had become ubiquitous, even in the isolated village in the fictionalised memoir Lark Rise to Candleford, where a cottager lays out what she calls a “visitor’s tea” for their landlady: “the table was laid… there were the best tea things with a fat pink rose on the side of each cup; hearts of lettuce, thin bread and butter, and the crisp little cakes that had been baked in readiness that morning.”

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Chocolate Town Cookies / Sjokolade Towncookies

Two cookie recipes from “Hershey’s Recipes”
published in the fifties
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Hershey was generous when it came to cook books in the twenties, thirties, forties and fifties. I’ve got one from each decade. This one is from the fifties – Ted

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Oat Biscuits / Havrekjeks

A traditional Norwegian biscuit recipe found on dinmat.no299_havrekjeks_post

It is a pity that these biscuits are almost only being made for Christmas here in Norway. It is absolutely delicious and tastes great with Norwegian goat cheese or any other cheese of your choice along with a nice cup of tea.

By the way, this recipe was also my guest post at Butter, Basil & Breadcumbs’s  Cookie Monday back in early February – Ted

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Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Potato Biscuits / Potetkjeks

Traditional Norwegian biscuits found on jaerbladet.no 581_potetkjeks_post

This is an old recipe from Jæren in Ryfylke in the south-western part of Norway. They are called biscuits but they are soft as thick lefse and tastes like a mixture of lefse and Norwegian “lapper”. Lovely with good butter and Norwegian goat cheese or jam.

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Recipe posted at:
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Roald Amundsen’s Oat Biscuits / Roald Amundsens Havrekjeks

Another kind of “waybread” found on matoppskrift.org551_amundsens havrekjeks_post

Oat biscuits is something no Norwegians can do without, so when Roald Amundsen planned the provisions for his South Pole expedition oat biscuits was probably high up on the list. It would surprise me a lot if the Norwegian goat cheese was not high up there too. Here is the recipe for the oat biscuits Amundsen brought.

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Recipe posted at:
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Baking Powder Biscuits – Bakepulver Kjeks

A recipe from “Cake Secrets” (Kake Hemmeligheter) published by Iglehearts sometimes in the 1920s

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