English Mustard Steak / Engelsk Sennepsstek

An English classic found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før” (Joy of
Food like Never Before) publishe by Skandinavisk Presse in 1977

English Mustard Steak / Engelsk Sennepsstek

A delicious recipe to add new dimensions of flavour to pork.
Serve it with buttered peas and mashed potatoes.

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Trifle With Baked Spiced Plums, Amaretti & Syllabub / Dessert Med Bakte, Krydrede Plommer, Amaretti & “Syllabub”

A Classic English desert recipe found on Tesco RealFood

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In context:

Syllabub (or solybubbe, sullabub, sullibib, sullybub, sullibub, there is considerable variation in spelling) is an English sweet dish described by the Oxford English Dictionary as “A drink or dish made of milk (freq. as drawn straight from the cow) or cream, curdled by the admixture of wine, cider, or other acid, and often sweetened and flavoured.”

It is reputedly most traditionally made by the milkmaid milking the cow directly into a jug of cider.

History:
Syllabub is known in England at least since John Heywood’s Thersytes of about 1537; “You and I… Muste walke to him and eate a solybubbe.” The word occurs repeatedly, including in Samuel Pepys’ diary for 12 July 1663; “Then to Comissioner Petts and had a good Sullybub.” and in Thomas Hughes’s Tom Brown at Oxford of 1861; “We retire to tea or syllabub beneath the shade of some great oak.”

A later variation, known as an Everlasting Syllabub, adds a stabiliser such as gelatine or corn starch.

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