Norwegian Rhubarb Cordial / Rabarbrasaft

An old fashioned cordial recipe found on jaerbladet.no
Norwegian Rhubarb Cordial / Rabarbrasaft

You will get a wonderful color on the cordial if you let the peel stay on the rhubarb and if you want, you can also add a handfull of raspberries or strawberries for color and taste.

This is raw cordial so it has shorter shelf life than boiled cordials, but it’s the taste of season and summer so enjoy the moment. Bring a bottle at the summer party, it will guaranteed be a popular gift.

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Traditional Norwegian Redcurrant Jelly / Tradisjonell Ripsgelé

A quick and simple jelly recipe found on dinmat.noTraditional Norwegian Redcurrant Jelly / Tradisjonell Ripsgelé

Conserving redcurrant has been known from the 17th century and in the 18th century the redcurrant bushes were widely spread in Norway. In Norwegian gardens there are very many bushes still, but there is little commercial production. Redcurrant contains pectin which makes it very suitable for jelly and jam. One portion of this recipe makes one jar of finished jelly.

We had both redcurrant, blackcurrant and gooseberry bushes in the garden where I grew up so this is stuff I grew up on – Ted

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Traditional Norwegian Raspberry Vinegar / Bringebæreddik

An old-fashioned way to conserve raspberries frukt.no
Traditional Norwegian Raspberry Vinegar / Bringebæreddik

Make a bottle or two of raspberry vinegar, then you have a delicious basis for dressings and desserts. It’s also a great host gift to bring along when you’re invited for dinner or tea.

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Red Currant Jam / Ripssyltetøy

A simple and quick recipe for jam found on frukt.no
Red Currant Jam / Ripssyltetøy

Red currant jelly is quite common here in Norway, both as a sandwich spread and for some types of dinner dishes, but I have not come across red currant jam before. On the other hand, now that I have I must say it sounds rather tempting. Slightly tart jam tasting of summer will surely be even more tempting when the the winter cold sets in – Ted

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Galia Melon Jam / Nettmelonsyltetøy

A recipe from “Sylting og Dypfrysing” (Jam Making and Deep freezing) published by Hjemmets Kokebokklubb in 1981melonsyltetøy_post

000_nettmelon_cr_thumb[1]Galia Melon has a distinctive grid pattern on the shell. The shell has a base color that is bright yellow, and the web pattern is gray-white to almost golden brown. Galia Melon is a big and round melon with a yellow and juicy pulp. It is actually somewhat larger than all the other sugar melons and can reach a weight up to 3-4 kg. The taste is aromatic, sweet and delicious.

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Homemade Strawberry Jam / Hjemmelaget Jordbærsyltetøy

A simple straightforward Norwegian recipe for
strawberry jam found on frukt.no

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Homemade is usually the best, and so it is with strawberry jam too. What’s better than waffles, French toast or fresh bread with homemade strawberry jam?

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Marmalade – Facts and History

Marmalade Facts and History_aboutfoodThe name Marmalade comes from the Portuguese word Marmelos, a quince paste similar in texture to an orange spread popular long before the commercialisation of marmalade in the late 18th century.

Despite the belief that marmalade was ‘invented’ in Scotland by James Keiller and his wife it was not – though due thanks must go to the Keiller who are generally credited with making the delicious breakfast preserve commercially available. The romantic notion of James Keiller discovering a cargo of bitter oranges being sold cheaply which his wife then turned into jam has long been outed considering the existence of recipes for similar ‘jams’ dating back to the 1500s.

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According to food historian Ivan Day, one of the earliest known recipe for for a Marmelet of Oranges (close to what we know as marmalade today) comes from the recipe book of Eliza Cholmondeley around 1677.

Types of Orange Marmalade

Marmalade Facts and History3_aboutfoodThere are endless varieties of Marmalade and arguments abound at the breakfast table to personal preferences. Amongst the most popular are:

Thick Cut – the orange peel in the jelly is cut into thick chunks creating a tangy bitter flavor.
Thin Cut – the orange peel is shredded finely resulting in a softer flavor and texture.
Flavored – endless varieties with added flavors; whisky, Grand Marnier, ginger, or a mixture of citrus fruits.
Vintage – marmalade left to mature for a denser, richer flavor.
Black – made by the adding of brown sugar or black molasses.

Making Marmalade

The bitter oranges needed for making true marmalade are only available in late-winter to early spring. Seville orange pulp is also available year-round in cans which it does make a good marmalade, though frowned on by purists.

Text from about.com/food

 Read more here: A Comprehensive History of Marmalade from the World Marmalade Awards.

Clementine Curd / Klementinkrem

A classic sandwich spread and cake filling from TescoRealFood163_clementine curd_post

This gorgeous, velvety curd can be made up to two weeks in advance, and if kept in a cool place will keep for up to one month. An ideal present for a hostess or a good friend.

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
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In Context
Fruit curd is a dessert spread and topping usually made with lemon, lime, orange or raspberry. The basic ingredients are beaten egg yolks, sugar, fruit juice and zest which are gently cooked together until thick and then allowed to cool, forming a soft, smooth, intensely flavoured spread. Some recipes also include egg whites and/or butter.

In late 19th and early 20th century England, home-made lemon curd was traditionally served with bread or scones at afternoon tea as an alternative to jam, and as a filling for cakes, small pastries and tarts. Homemade lemon curd was usually made in relatively small amounts as it did not keep as well as jam. In more modern times larger quantities are feasible because of the use of refrigeration.
From Wikipedia