Black Currant Liqueur / Solbærlikør

A liqueur recipe found on norsktradisjonsmat.no
Black Currant Liqueur / Solbærlikør

Black currant will make a delicious liqueur. Liquor came to Norway in the 16th century. At that time, the pharmacies were responsible for the sale, under the label “medicine for everything”. Initially it was imported, but soon Norwegians learned to produce it by fermentation of grain or potatoes and distillation. Making liqueurs for Christmas is a long tradition in many Norwegian families, including my own.

This recipe is taken from the book “Drink from Østfold”, published by Østfold Associated Country Women in 2007. If you start now, the liqueur will be finished well in advance of Christmas.

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Martha Washington’s “Excellent Cherry Bounce” / Martha Washingtons "Utmerkede Kirsebær Bounce"

A historic cherry liqueur recipe found on Revolutionary Pie
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The girl who runs Revolutionary Pie writes: Bounce is made from sour cherries, sugar, and liquor such as brandy, rum, or whiskey. Martha’s recipe, which was found in her papers although not in her handwriting, called for brandy. This drink was one of George’s favorites. He even took it along on journeys — on a trip west in 1784, in search of a commercial waterway from the Atlantic to the Mississippi Valley, he packed canteens of Madeira, port, and bounce.

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Rhubarb Liqueur / Rabarbra Likør

A somewhat strange liqueur recipe found on food52.com
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By taking just a few minutes to throw 3 ingredients in a jar, you can make rhubarb season stretch a little bit longer — and a killer after-dinner drink while you’re at it. We also see this mixed with sparkling water (or sparkling wine!) and sipped by the pool.

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As a man coming from a family who have made homemade liqueur for well over a hundred years I must say I’m deeply skeptical to the rhubarb/sugar ratio in this recipe. 2 pounds rhubarb/0,7 pound sugar makes for a extremely tart liqueur, missing the sweetness most people associate with this sort of beverage. Even when making cherry liqueur (a berry a lot less tart than rhubarb) I use a fifty/fifty ratio.  – Ted  😉

Strawberry Gin / Jordbær Gin

A homemade strawberry flavoured gin found on yourhomemagazine.co.uk667_Strawberry gin_post

Unlike sloe gin, this strawberry version only needs 3 days to stand for the flavours to develop. Decant into a pretty bottle, or several smaller ones, and add a handmade label for a personalised gift.

000_recipe_eng_flagg Recipe in English  000_recipe_nor_flagg Oppskrift på norsk

Recipe posted at:
Tickle My Tastebuds Tuesday[4]TuesdaysTable copyTreasure Box Tuesday[4]

Plums In Rum / Plommer I Rom

A desert recipe found at dansukker.no027_plum_in_rhum_post
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See this and lots of delicious recipes on:
Tickle-My-Tastebuds-Tuesday5TuesdaysTable copyTreasure-Box-Tuesday5

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