Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

A suffle recipe found in “10 Inspirerende Oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 Inspiring Recipes with Jarlsberg)
published by
 Tine
Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

Jarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈjɑːɭsˈbærɡ]; English /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

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Mushrooms in Tart Shells / Sopp i Terteskjell

A lunch recipe found in “Alt om Urter” (All About Herbs) published by Den Norske Bokklubben in 1885sopp i terteskjell_post_thumb[2]_thumb

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A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

illustration_01This article was printed in “The Hostess” published by the Bromangelon Publishing Department in 1910, and it is making it quite clear that when inviting a few lady friends over for luncheon back then putting a box of Twinings Earl Grey tea bags and a tray of hastily made sandwiches on the table simply wouldn’t do

Ted
Winking smile


Every hostess, however modest her home surroundings, cherishes the ambition to shine in her own little sphere. The ideas suggested in this little book are intended as a guide to simple methods of entertaining in a hospitable, easy, refined and dignified manner, without any undue extravagance. They are intended to serve, not as set patterns to be copied or followed in every detail, but rather to suggest to the ingenious hostess, ways of adapting her own original ideas to the art of graceful home entertainment.

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Most hostesses do not realize the full value and usefulness of the serving table. To serve a meal without a maid  is easy of accomplishment, if one will follow the hints conveyed in this description.

Instead of the more conventional large tablecloth, for this cosy occasion we will use the more decorative embroidered centerpiece and doilies.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

Place on the embroidered centerpiece an earthen jar or vase filled with honeysuckle or some graceful flowering vine. At each cover place a low, small glass with a long branch of the same vine; a water glass partly filled with cracked ice, a small butter plate, containing a butter ball, the little knife by its side; a doily, on which is the service-plate; to the right, two silver knives (sharp edge toward the plate)—to the left, three forks (the prongs turned up), and the napkin, folded square (monogram side up). On the table are three trays, one containing narrow strips of twice-baked bread; and the two smaller ones holding chocolate or other bonbons, and olives or salted almonds.

Most of this luncheon is prepared in advance, and ten minutes before serving, the hostess excuses herself to her guests to heat the first course and prepare the coffee. Everything else is in readiness.

The Menu

Lobster Newburg on Toast
Finger Slices of Dry Toast
Cold Turkey or Chicken
Hearts of Celery
Twice Baked Bread
Jellied Pecan Salad
Brown Bread Sandwiches
Chocolate Cakes filled with Whipped Cream
Black Coffee
Cheese Straws
Salted Nuts, (or Olives)
Sweets

As the guests enter the dining-room, the first course, Lobster Newburg (or Crab Creole) has already been placed. This has been prepared in advance, and only required quick heating on gas burner or chafing-dish before serving. The serving table with a five o’clock tea cloth of handsome linen stands against the wall to the left of the hostess. This table is of the same height as the luncheon table, and is equipped with a lower shelf of the same size as the table top. On top are placed the water pitcher, ice bowl, after-dinner coffee cups and saucers, the plates, a handsome coffee pot and two covered  trays, one holding cheese straws, the other the  cakes.

A Ladies’ Luncheon Served by the Hostess anno 1910

On the lower shelf, out of sight, are the second and third courses (which are both cold) arranged on plates—the salad plates toward the back, the plates of cold chicken or turkey (dressed with celery hearts and twice-baked bread) towards the front. The four finger bowls, the napkins and extra silver are in a corner at the back.

Each guest, as she receives the plate for the second course, passes her used plate and silver from the first course to the hostess. These used plates are slipped by the hostess into the places just vacated on the lower shelf of the serving table. When the salad comes forward, places are made for the plates from the second course. Thus, as soon as a plate has been used, it vanishes as completely as with the best trained service. After all the plates and silver have been used, they can be placed in piles on the lower shelf, and removed after the departure of the guests.

When dessert and coffee have been served, the guests will retire with the hostess to the drawing room.

If these instructions are observed everything will pass off very smoothly.

Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A historic egg dish recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
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Take eggs, and draw the yolks and white through a strainer, And take onions, And Shred them small. And take fair butter or grease, and scarcely cover over the pan therewith. And fry the onions together, then let them fry together a little while. And take them up, And serve them forth so, all broken in a dish.

From Harleian MS. 4016, I Volume

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Pop-Overs

A baking recipe found in”Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book
of Recipes” published in the 1920s

Pop-Overs

A popover is a light, hollow roll made from an egg batter similar to that of Yorkshire pudding, typically baked in muffin tins or dedicated popover pans, which have straight-walled sides rather than angled.

Popovers may be served either as a sweet – topped with fruit and whipped cream or butter and jam for breakfast or with afternoon tea – or with meats at lunch and dinner.

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If you want to download
Borden’s Evaporated Milk Book of Recipes
click the icon below

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Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

A fish recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon” published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

Chafing-Dish_thumb2A chafing dish (from the French chauffer, “to make warm”) is a kind of portable grate raised on a tripod, originally heated with charcoal in a brazier, and used for foods that require gentle cooking, away from the “fierce” heat of direct flames. The chafing dish could be used at the table or provided with a cover for keeping food warm on a buffet. Double dishes that provide a protective water jacket are known as bains-marie and help keep delicate foods, such as fish, warm while preventing overcooking.

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Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

A healthy lunch recipe found in “Rethink School Lunch –
Cooking With California Food” an E-book published
by Center for Ecoliteracy

Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

Snow peas, which add a sweet crunch to this recipe, were an early spring crop in ancient China, harvested when snow was still on the ground, hence their name. Napa cabbage has a sweet, mild taste and can be used raw in salads, as it is here. Toasting the walnuts first will bring out their flavor.

If you would like to download
‘Rethink School Lunch – Cooking With California Food
click the title above

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Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

A lunch recipe found in “60 Ways to Serve Ham” published
by Armour & Company in 1930
Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

Armour & Company published a series of these cookbooks promoting their hams and bacon  in the 1920s and 1930s, all with very artistic illustrations like this one. If you like to download this cook book in pdf format, click the title below.

‘60 Ways to Serve Ham’

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Albondigas – Mexican Soup / Meksikansk Suppe

A healthy soup recipe found in “Rethink School Lunch –
Cooking With California Food” an E-book published
by Center for Ecoliteracy

Albondigas – Mexican Soup / Meksikansk Suppe

This is a classic version of the popular Mexican soup. The meatballs provide protein, while rice adds whole grains to this healthful dish. If desired, you can use all beef instead of half beef and half pork.

If you would like to download
‘Rethink School Lunch – Cooking With California Food
click the title above

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Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

A vegetable omelette recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

Omelettes are among the the most versatile dishes there is. You can make one for breakfast, for lunch, as an appetizer, a dessert and even enjoy one as an evening meal. You can fill them with just about anything and use whatever kind of spice or herbs you prefere to suit your taste and eating practices. For instance vegetables and chives like in the one in this post.

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Boeuf Lyonaise

A classic lunch dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Boeuf Lyonaise

This dish is closely related to the salad Parisienne. Both are based on the same basic ingredients. The biggest difference is that one is a warm meal while the other is a cold one. The dish is excellent to turn to when you have some leftover roast beef or other types of beef.

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In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese style lunch recipe found in “Internasjonale Retter med Norsk Fisk” (International dishes with Norwegian Fish) published
by Wennergren – Cappelen in 1987

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese steamer like the one on the picture is a great addition to any kitchen and can be used to steam just about anything. Rise, fish,
vegetables, shelfish, you name it. If you haven’t already got one,
go get one.

Ted
Winking smile

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Bacon and Double Cheese Quiche / Quiche med Bacon og To Sorts Oster

A lunch recipe from a card in the “Great American Home Baking” collecting published in 1992Bacon and Double Cheese Quiche / Quiche med Bacon og To Sorts Oster

Paired with a tossed green salad, this full-flavored quiche makes
an excellent lunch.

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Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

A seafood lunch recipe found in “Sundt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

Dill gives the sauce a warm, sweet taste. In combination with the cucumber it becomes an excellent accompaniment to the salmon.

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