Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

A suffle recipe found in “10 Inspirerende Oppskrifter
med Jarlsberg” (10 Inspiring Recipes with Jarlsberg)
published by
 Tine
Cheese Suffle with Tomato and Watermelon Salad / Ostesufflé med Tomat- og Vannmelonsalat

Jarlsberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈjɑːɭsˈbærɡ]; English /ˈjɑːrlzbɜːrɡ/) is a mild cow’s-milk cheese with large regular holes, that originates from Jarlsberg, Norway. Although it originated in Norway, it is also produced in Ohio and Ireland under licenses from Norwegian dairy producers.

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Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A historic egg dish recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
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Take eggs, and draw the yolks and white through a strainer, And take onions, And Shred them small. And take fair butter or grease, and scarcely cover over the pan therewith. And fry the onions together, then let them fry together a little while. And take them up, And serve them forth so, all broken in a dish.

From Harleian MS. 4016, I Volume

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Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

A fish recipe found in “How To Eat Canned Salmon” published by Alaska Packers Association in 1900Salmon a la Reine / Laks a la Reine

Chafing-Dish_thumb2A chafing dish (from the French chauffer, “to make warm”) is a kind of portable grate raised on a tripod, originally heated with charcoal in a brazier, and used for foods that require gentle cooking, away from the “fierce” heat of direct flames. The chafing dish could be used at the table or provided with a cover for keeping food warm on a buffet. Double dishes that provide a protective water jacket are known as bains-marie and help keep delicate foods, such as fish, warm while preventing overcooking.

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Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

A healthy lunch recipe found in “Rethink School Lunch –
Cooking With California Food” an E-book published
by Center for Ecoliteracy

Chinese Chicken Salad / Kinesisk Kyllingsalat

Snow peas, which add a sweet crunch to this recipe, were an early spring crop in ancient China, harvested when snow was still on the ground, hence their name. Napa cabbage has a sweet, mild taste and can be used raw in salads, as it is here. Toasting the walnuts first will bring out their flavor.

If you would like to download
‘Rethink School Lunch – Cooking With California Food
click the title above

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Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

A lunch recipe found in “60 Ways to Serve Ham” published
by Armour & Company in 1930
Ham Hash with Poached Eggs / Hakket Skinke med Porsjerte Egg

Armour & Company published a series of these cookbooks promoting their hams and bacon  in the 1920s and 1930s, all with very artistic illustrations like this one. If you like to download this cook book in pdf format, click the title below.

‘60 Ways to Serve Ham’

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Albondigas – Mexican Soup / Meksikansk Suppe

A healthy soup recipe found in “Rethink School Lunch –
Cooking With California Food” an E-book published
by Center for Ecoliteracy

Albondigas – Mexican Soup / Meksikansk Suppe

This is a classic version of the popular Mexican soup. The meatballs provide protein, while rice adds whole grains to this healthful dish. If desired, you can use all beef instead of half beef and half pork.

If you would like to download
‘Rethink School Lunch – Cooking With California Food
click the title above

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Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

A vegetable omelette recipe found in “Sundt og Godt”
(Wholesome and Nice) published by Det Beste in 1988

Asparagus and Mushroom Omelette / Asparges- og Soppomelett

Omelettes are among the the most versatile dishes there is. You can make one for breakfast, for lunch, as an appetizer, a dessert and even enjoy one as an evening meal. You can fill them with just about anything and use whatever kind of spice or herbs you prefere to suit your taste and eating practices. For instance vegetables and chives like in the one in this post.

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Boeuf Lyonaise

A classic lunch dish found  in “Cattelins Kokebok”
(Cattelin’s Cook Book) published in 1978

Boeuf Lyonaise

This dish is closely related to the salad Parisienne. Both are based on the same basic ingredients. The biggest difference is that one is a warm meal while the other is a cold one. The dish is excellent to turn to when you have some leftover roast beef or other types of beef.

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In context: Cattelin’s is one of the best and most reasonably priced restaurants in Stockholm. It has survived wars, disasters, and changing tastes, and still manages to pack ‘em in, so they must be doing something right. Read more here and here

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

A delicious soup recipe found in “50+ Quick & Easy Recipes”
Published by Gotham Steel

Curried Butternut Squash and Pear Soup / Karrikrydret Butternut Gresskar- og Pære Suppe

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Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has butternut-squash (1)a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin E.

Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups, or mashed and used in casseroles, breads, and muffins.

History

The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Waltham, Massachusetts, where it was developed at the Waltham Experiment Station by Robert E. Young. Dorothy Leggett claims that the Waltham Butternut squash was developed during the 1940s by her late husband, Charles Leggett, in Stow, Massachusetts, and then subsequently introduced by him to the researchers at the Waltham Field Station. She also claimed that name came from “smooth as butter, sweet as nut”.

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese style lunch recipe found in “Internasjonale Retter med Norsk Fisk” (International dishes with Norwegian Fish) published
by Wennergren – Cappelen in 1987

Chinese Style Steamed Halibut with Cabbage / Kokt Kveite på Kinesisk Vis

A Chinese steamer like the one on the picture is a great addition to any kitchen and can be used to steam just about anything. Rise, fish,
vegetables, shelfish, you name it. If you haven’t already got one,
go get one.

Ted
Winking smile

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Bacon and Double Cheese Quiche / Quiche med Bacon og To Sorts Oster

A lunch recipe from a card in the “Great American Home Baking” collecting published in 1992Bacon and Double Cheese Quiche / Quiche med Bacon og To Sorts Oster

Paired with a tossed green salad, this full-flavored quiche makes
an excellent lunch.

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Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

A seafood lunch recipe found in “Sundt og Godt” (Wholesome and Delicious) published by Det Beste in 1988Salmon with Cucumber and Dill Sauce / Laks med Agurk og Dillsaus

Dill gives the sauce a warm, sweet taste. In combination with the cucumber it becomes an excellent accompaniment to the salmon.

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Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

A classic salad recipe found in “Robert Carrier’s Kitchen
Cook Book” published in 1980

Real Salade Russe / Ekte Salade Russe

Robert Carrier McMahon, OBE (Tarrytown, New York, November 10, 1923 – France, June 27, 2006), usually known as Robert Carrier, was an American chef, restaurateur and cookery writer. His success came in England, where he was based from 1953 to 1984, and then from 1994 until his death.

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Lucien OlivierThe original version of the salad was invented in the 1860s by a cook of Belgian origin, Lucien Olivier, the chef of the Hermitage, one of Moscow’s most celebrated restaurants. Olivier’s salad quickly became immensely popular with Hermitage regulars, and became the restaurant’s signature dish.

The HermitageThe exact recipe — particularly that of the dressing — was a jealously guarded secret, but it is known that the salad contained grouse, veal tongue, caviar, lettuce, crayfish tails, capers, and smoked duck, although it is possible that the recipe was varied seasonally. The original Olivier dressing was a type of mayonnaise, made with French wine vinegar, mustard, and Provençal olive oil; its exact recipe, however, remains unknown.

At the turn of the 20th century, one of Olivier’s sous-chefs, Ivan Ivanov, attempted to steal the recipe. While preparing the dressing one evening in solitude, as was his custom, Olivier was suddenly called away on some emergency. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Ivanov sneaked into Olivier’s private kitchen and observed his mise en place, which allowed him to make reasonable assumptions about the recipe of Olivier’s famed dressing.

Ivanov then left Olivier’s employ and went to work as a chef for Moskva, a somewhat inferior restaurant, where he began to serve a suspiciously similar salad under the name “capital salad” (Russian: столичный, tr. stolichny). It was reported by the gourmands of the time, however, that the dressing on the stolichny salad was of a lower quality than Olivier’s, meaning that it was “missing something.”

Later, Ivanov sold the recipe for the salad to various publishing houses, which further contributed to its popularization. Due to the closure of the Hermitage restaurant in 1905, and the Olivier family’s subsequent departure from Russia, the salad could now be referred to as “Olivier.”

One of the first printed recipes for Olivier salad, by Aleksandrova, appearing in 1894, called for half a hazel grouse, two potatoes, one small cucumber (or a large cornichon), 3-4 lettuce leaves, 3 large crayfish tails, 1/4 cup cubed aspic, 1 teaspoon of capers, 3–5 olives, and 1 12 tablespoon Provençal dressing (mayonnaise).

As often happens with gourmet recipes which become popular, the ingredients that were rare, expensive, seasonal, or difficult to prepare were gradually replaced with cheaper and more readily available foods.

Tori Saka Mushi No Goma – Japanese Sake Steamed Chicken in Sesame Sauce / Japansk Sakedampet Kylling I Sesamfrøsaus

A Japanese chicken recipe found in “Asia – En Kulinarisk Reise”
(A Culinary Voyage) published by Grøndahl Dreyer in 1987

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The fine flavor combination of sake (rice liquor) and goma (sesame seeds) gives a real flair to the tender chicken meat. For the sauce used ground, toasted sesame seeds or the Middle Eastern tahini paste. You can also use peanut butter, although this ingredient is not quite as authentic.

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Peel-and-eat Shrimp with Spicy Herb Butter / Rens-og-Spis Reker Med Krydret Urtesmør

A delicious and simpel seafood recipe found on saveur.com
Peel-and-eat Shrimp with Spicy Herb Butter / Rens-og-Spis Reker Med Krydret Urtesmør

A great way to eat fresh shrimps and a bit more exciting than the traditional way we do it here in Norway: spread on fresh white bread, topped with mayonnaise, freshly ground pepper and dripped with lemon juice. It is not unlikely that I’ll try this the next time the lust for shrimps grabs me (but I won’t skip the white bread though) – Ted  😉

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