One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

A camp fire one pot dinner recipe found on I heart Naptime
One Pot Creamy Chicken and Rice / Kremaktig Kylling og Ris Tilberedt i en Gryte

Easy healthy dinner recipe made with simple real
ingredients in just one pot.

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Fish and Chips

A campfire recipe found un the booklet “Ut og Spise”
(Out and Eat) published by
 godfisk.noFish and Chips

This is not Fish and Chips as we usually think of it,
but there is fish and there are potato chips.

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Campfire Potatoes / Bålbakte potetskiver

A potato recipe fond on allrecipes.com
Campfire Potatoes / Bålbakte potetskiver

A simple yet tasty way to prepare potatoes by the campfire while
the rest of the meal is prepared in the frying pan.

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Breakfast in a Roll / Frokost i et Rundstykke

A campfire breakfast recipe found at blog.koa.comBreakfast in a Roll / Frokost i et Rundstykke

The ingredients for this breakfast can be prepared ahead, packed in plastic bokses and easily assembled at your campsite.

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Campfire Cooking – Brown Bears / Brune Bjørner

A lovely breakfast recipe perfect  for camping
found on allrecipes.com

Campfire Cooking - Brown Bears / Brune Bjørner

Your kids will love making these brown bears for breakfast whenever you go camping. They’re super simple and no prep for mom or dad!”

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Focaccia with Rosemary and Onion / Focaccia med Rosmarin og Løk

A bread recipe found on “The Camping Cookbook”
published by Go Outdoors in 2016

Focaccia with Rosemary and Onion / Focaccia med Rosmarin og Løk

Bread is a real food staple yet so many people buy a loaf at the store, depriving themselves of the love, the smell and the sense of satisfaction that is baking. Making bread outside is just as easy as picking it up from the supermarket. All you need is a cast iron frying pan and some foil.

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A Brief History of Grilling

A Brief History of GrillingThe history of grilling begins shortly after the domestication of fire, some 500,000 years ago. The backyard ritual of grilling as we know it, though, is much more recent. Until well into the 1940s, grilling mostly happened at campsites and picnics. After World War II, as the middle class began to move to the suburbs, backyard grilling caught on, becoming all the rage by the 1950s.

In suburban Chicago, George Stephen, a metalworker by trade and a tinkerer A Brief History of Grillingby habit, had grown frustrated with the flat, open brazier-style grills common at the time. Once he inherited controlling interest in the Weber Bros. Metal Spinning Co, a company best-known as a maker of harbor buoys, he decided the buoy needed some modification. He cut it along its equator, added a grate, used the top as a lid and cut vents for controlling temperature. The Weber grill was born and backyard cooking has never been the same.

If man has been grilling since the Stone Age, he had to wait a good long time before he got his first taste of ‘barbecue.’ Just how long is a matter of debate, but the A Brief History of Grillingword’s etymology has been traced via the Spanish (‘barbacoa’) to a similar word used by the Arawak people of the Caribbean to denote a wooden structure on which they roasted meat. (The Arawak’s other contribution to the English language is the word ‘cannibal’.) Only the sense of a wooden framework survived the word’s transition to English; the context was lost. So, in the 17th century, you might use a ‘barbecue’ as shelving, or you might sleep on a ‘barbecue’ — but you definitely weren’t cooking with one.

A Brief History of GrillingLike so many of the most recognizably “American” of foods and foodways — hot dogs, Thanksgiving dinners, even milk on breakfast cereals — barbecue goes back to 18th-century colonial America, specifically the settlements along the Southeastern seaboard. The direct descendant of that original American barbecue is Eastern Carolina-style pit barbecue, which traditionally starts with the whole hog and, after as many as fourteen hours over coals, culminates in a glorious mess of pulled pork doused with vinegar sauce and eaten on a hamburger bun, with coleslaw on the side.

As the settlers spread westward, regional variations developed, leaving us today with four distinct styles of barbecue.

  • Carolina-style has split into Eastern, Western and South Carolina-style, with variations largely in the sauce: South Carolina uses a mustard sauce; Western Carolina uses a sweeter vinegar-and-tomato sauce.
  • Memphis barbecue is probably what most of us think of when we think of BBQ — pork ribs with a sticky sweet-and-sour tomato-based mopping sauce.
  • Texas, being cattle country, has always opted for beef, usually brisket, dry-rubbed and smoked over mesquite with a tomato-based sauce served on the side, almost as an afterthought.
  • Kansas City lies at the crossroads of BBQ nation. Fittingly, you’ll find a little bit of everything there — beef and pork, ribs and shoulder, etc. What brings it all together is the sauce: sweet-hot, tomato-based KC barbecue sauce is a classic in its own right, and the model for most supermarket BBQ sauces.

Hungrytime Outdoors from 1940 in PDF

Hungrytime Outdoors from 1940 in PDF

HUNGRYTIME OUTDOORS

by Bill Kraus

Explorer – Scout Commissioner – Creve
Coeur Council. Member of Adventurers’
Club in Chicago

From the book intro: You can use it at home . . . for trips . . . for the family and friends. It is a valuable meal planner for that organization that counts on you for leadership in FUN and in GOOD EATING, which make for good health and snappy program. Keep this book always handy – ready to plan keen adventures in eating. Pass it on to friends that need help in planning picnics, trips, hikes, outings, and all the other excuses for GOOD EATING. They say when you eat outdoors . . . “everything you eat goes to your stomach . . .”

The book was published by
American National Dairy Council
in 1940


This gem of camping and hiking cook book full of
recipes  and outdoor tips can be yours for free
just by clicking the icon below

pdf symbol[6]

The Camping Cook Book in PDF

The Camping Cook Book in PDF

The Camping Cook Book

a free e-book published by
www.gooutdoors.co.uk

From the intro in the book:
Make your next outdoor adventure one to remember with
our selectio of easy-cook camping recipes from top camping
and outdoors bloggers.

We’ve got all of your needs covered – whatever your tastes, with
a varied range of food for every meal. Forget your typical campfire
burgers and sausages; these recipes create wholesome, healthy
and tasty food you’ll want to make again and again.

If you live in the UK or plan to go there
don’t miss out on Go Outdoor’s blog:

blog.gooutdoors.co.uk/


This cook book full of healthy, tasteful recipes
can be yours simply by clicking the icon below

pdf symbol

Nothing’s More Fun Than … Eating Outdoors in PDF

Nothing's More Fun Than ... Eating Outdoors in PDF

Nothing’s More Fun Than … Eating Outdoors

by Milton Youngren

Published by National Dairy Council in 1958


It’s a book full of recipes tested by experience . . . cookery hints . . . camp tricks . . . outdoor merriment.

When you and your friends head for the wonderland of the great outdoors, everybody’s going to want to eat! You’ll get a real kick out of being able to produce a delicious outdoor meal – one that’s fun and easy to fix.

I’ve camped on the banks of the Yellowstone River—by the clear waters of Bright Angel Creek at the bottom of the Grand Canyon—on the picturesque shores of Lake Champlain. I’ve toted a pack across Death Valley—carried grub along the Mohawk—enjoyed bear stew in Michigan—venison steaks on winter trails. You never need be hungry on a camping trip. At the end of each day’s going there’s the cheerful cooking fire the fragrance of food steaming in the pot—of Hunter’s Biscuits ready in a jiffy and maybe spiced with fresh, wild berries. Find your campsite, build the right kind of a cooking fire, get a supply of water at hand, and fill the air with that irresistible smell of food cooking in the open. There’s nothing else like it – From the intro by the author


This classic hiking and camping tips, tricks and cook book
can be yours in pdf format simply by clicking the icon below

pdf symbol

Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

A different and exciting pizza recipe found on
Dagbladet Mat
Campfire Cooking – Blueberry Pizza / Blåbærpizza

In the autumn blueberries can be enjoyed in many ways, and this pizza with blueberries, honey and blue cheese is an exciting variation that tastes amazingly good!

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Campfire Spinach Dip / Spinatdip til Bålkosen

A great dip recipe found on diyprojects.com
Campfire Spinach Dip_post

Camping does not have to be all hot dogs and hamburgers.  One should  include a few family favorites when one head out into the great outdoors.  This Campfire Spinach Dip is sure to become one of yours!

It’s a nice break from the traditional camping fare.  Served with a sliced baguette it makes the perfect breakfast or light lunch.  Creating a tin foil packet to encase the dip in makes cooking and clean up a breeze!

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Blue Cheese Filled Bacon-Wrapped Mushrooms / Roquefortfylte Baconsurret Sopp

A great camping snack recipe found on homemaderecipes.com
headingBlue Cheese Filled Bacon-Wrapped Mushrooms / Roquefortfylte Baconsurret Sopp

These delicious snacks can be made ready at home before you head for the hike and grilled on a campfire grill grid when you have set up camp, dinner is over and the tea water is boiling. If you don’t bother to bring a grid a few stick will work just as well.

You could make these snacks at home too of course, but we all know they will taste much, much better by the campfire – Ted  😉

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BBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

A quick and simple foil pack recipe found on tasteofhome.com
headingBBQ Hot Dog & Potato Packs / BBQ Pølse & Potet Pakker

Aluminium foil is an absolute must when packing for a camping hike. Whether you packed a small gas cooker or you plan to do all your cooking on the campfire the foil will provide an easy and carefree way to prepare hot food. More recipes using foil will follow in this series – Ted  🙂

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Wholemeal Pancakes / Grove Pannekaker

A recipe for classic Norwegian hiking food
found on brodogkorn.no

Grove pannekaker_post

Wholemeal pancakes are great hiking food. Pour flour, whole wheat, oatmeal, eggs and milk in a bottle, and cook the pancakes on your camping stove or in a frying pan on your camp fire. Serve them with jam.

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