Medieval Monday – Marzipan With Spices / Marsipan Med Krydder

A sweet recipe once in use only for the privileged few found on New Scandinavian Cooking

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043_saffron-and-cinnamon-chicken-with-barley2Andreas Viestad at New Scandinavian Cooking writes: Marzipan was a favourite in medieval times. At that time, it was only sweets for the privileged few. Today it is one of Norway’s favourite sweets, especially popular around Christmas time. If you haven’t tasted homemade marzipan, you are in for a treat! Here I have flavoured and coloured the marzipan with different spices.

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Medieval Monday – Arroz Con Leche / Milk Pudding / Melkepudding

A Spanish desert recipe from the Medieval era of Muslim Rule found on The Winter Guest

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078_arroz_imgThe lady who runs The Winter Guest writes:
A lusciously creamy rice pudding, arroz con leche, is a hugely popular dessert all over Spain, it originated during the Medieval Muslim rule of Spain. Here is a 13th century version, sweetened with honey instead of sugar.

 

 

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Medieval Monday – Muscules In Shelle / Blåskjell

A medieval recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs

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About Eva GrelsdotterEva Grelsdotter writes: This very easy recipe and very similar to modern mussel soup recipes. Preparing the mussels for the dish takes some time because you have to clean them separately and remove their beard. Never use mussels that are open (or does not close their shells when tapping them gently with a knife). because they are dead. And never eat the mussels that are not open after cooking! Otherwise you might get a bad food poisoning.

Original recipe from Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II: Take and pick fair mussels, and cast them in a pot; and cast them to, minced onions, And good quantity of pepper and wine, And a little vinegar; and as soon as they begin to gape, take them from the fire, and serve it forth with the same broth in a dish all hot.

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Medieval Monday – Beef & Bacon Pie / Biff & Bacon Pai

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At The Inn At The Crossroad they write: The sweetness of this medieval pie comes from added fruit and honey. As the pie bakes, the fruit melts, giving a lovely counter-taste to the tart vinegar and salty bacon. The fruit flavour fades into the background and what remains is a sweet, rich meat pie with an easy medley of flavours.

Original Recipe:
To make Pyes. Pyes of mutton or beif must be fyne mynced & seasoned with pepper and salte and a lytel saffron to colour it, suet or marrow a good quantitie, a lytell vynegre, pruynes, great reasons, and dates, take the fattest of the broath of powdred beefe.  – A Propre new booke of Cokery, 1545

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Medieval Monday – Saffron & Cinnamon Chicken With Barley / Safran & Kanel Kylling Med Bygggryn

A recipe found at NewScandinavianCooking – Recipe by Andreas Viestad

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043_saffron-and-cinnamon-chicken-with-barley2Andreas Viestad writes: In Medieval times, most Norwegians had a pretty basic diet. When they didn’t eat porridge, they had fish. And if they had neither, they had nothing. However, the upper classes and the clergy led a quite different life, with freshwater fish, poultry and exotic spices.

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Medieval Monday – Cabbage Chowder

A Medieval recipe from Hungry PepoorMedieval Monday copy035_Medieval-Cabbage-Chowder_post
035_Medieval-Cabbage-Chowder2the girl who runs Hungry Peepor writes:
It’s a jolly time to feel like a king!

To start off my saffron adventures proper, I’ve finally decided to use and adapt one of the simplest recipes found in ‘The Medieval Cookbook‘. The original excerpt in old English for the ‘Cabbage Chowder’ recipe goes like this:
‘Caboches in potage. Take caboches and quarter hem, and seeth hem in gode broth with oynouns ymnced and the whyte of lekes yslyt and ycorue smale. And do therto safroun & salt, and force it with powdour douce.’ (CI.IV.6.)

On the recipe page is what I gather they’re trying to tell us.

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Medieval Monday – Chicken And Leek Pie / Kylling Og Purrepai

A medieval pie recipe from epicurius.comMedieval Monday copy015_kylling og purrepai_post
From Epicurius:
An historic recipe dating back to medieval Wales, Chicken and Leek Pie offers incredible, comforting flavours and simple luxury.  This was elegant cuisine then as it remains today.  This is one of a range of great recipes that came over to the United States in its early, colonial days, becoming a favourite of taverns and home cooks.  It forms the basis for Chicken Pot Pie, it’s more common American cousin.

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Medieval Monday – Ox Tail Soup

A medieval recipe from The Inn At The Crossroad

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From the About page on “The Inn At The Crossroad”:
In 2012 our hard work was rewarded with the delightful publication of the Official Game of Thrones Cookbook. Since then, I have continued to explore Westerosi dishes and medieval recipes, updating and improving the blog as I go. For me, it has become a way of life, the kitchen table laden with pork pie, hot spiced wine, lemoncakes, and so many more enticing edibles.

The journey continues, so loosen your belts, sharpen your knives, and set out for the kitchens of Westeros. Check out Game of Brews for the companion beverages to these foods, and follow the Inn on Twitter and Facebook for all the very latest in what I’m cooking, brewing, or planning, and be sure to visit often!


Original recipe: Beef y-Stywyd. Take fayre beef of þe rybbys of þe fore quarterys, an smyte in fayre pecys, an wasche þe beef in-to a fayre potte; þan take þe water þat þe beef was soþin yn, an strayne it þorw a straynowr, an sethe þe same water and beef in a potte, an let hem boyle to-gederys; þan take canel, clowes, maces, graynys of parise, quibibes, and oynons y-mynced, perceli, an sawge, an caste þer-to, an let hem boyle to-gederys; an þan take a lof of brede, an stepe it with brothe an venegre, an þan draw it þorw a straynoure, and let it be stylle; an whan it is nere y-now, caste þe lycour þer-to, but nowt to moche, an þan let boyle onys, an cast safroun þer-to a quantyte; þan take salt an venegre, and cast þer-to, an loke þat it be poynaunt y-now, & serue forth. —Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books

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Medieval Monday – Stuffed Eggs / Fyllte Egg

A recipe found at lavenderandlovage.com
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947_fylte egg_post2Karen, who run “Lavender & Lovage” was born in South Africa and on moving back to England she was brought up in rural Northumbria, in an old stone cottage; her earliest memories are of picking hazelnuts and foraging for wild herbs and garlic with her grandmother for her famous stew pot. The milk was delivered by the farmer and was decanted into a billy can directly from the milk churns. All of the fruit and vegetables were home-grown, and they always had fresh eggs from our hens.

Her interest in food started from a very early age; she was greatly influenced by her grandmother and mother. She clearly remember tables groaning under the weight of home-baked pies, cakes, scones, tarts, preserves, jams, pickles and bread. Nobody ever left the table empty. Cooking was seasonal and she remember looking forward to the new season’s produce with anticipation and pleasure – the seasons marked the year and its feasts and celebrations.

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