Medieval Monday–Dried Apples / Tørkede Epler

A Medieval fruit preserving method found on cookit.e2bn.org 
Dried Apples_post
Dried apple rings were popular in the 16th century, as a way of storing fruit to last for the winter. Dried fruit could be soaked and used in puddings and sauces as needed.These keep very well and still make a nice healthy snack.
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Kishkiyya – Medieval Hangover Cures / Bakruskur fra Middelalderen

A Medieval hangover cure found on medievalists.net
Kishkiyya - Medieval Hangover Cures

Kishkiyya - Medieval Hangover Cures 2Feeling a little worse for wear after ringing in the New Year? Rolling out of bed with a banging headache and a mouth that’s dry as ash? Cringing as you scroll through Facebook and see photos of yourself dancing with a tie around your head at 2am?

Well, as you chug some water, and curse yourself for believing in your drinking and dancing prowess, here are a few hangover cures from days gone by, because people who partied like it was 1399 also needed a little help the morning after.

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Vegetable Pottage / Grønnsakssuppe

A everyday soup recipe for ordinary people
found on
cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval MondayVegetable Pottage_post

People have eaten a lot of soup throughout the ages, ever since they had made the first cooking pots that would withstand heat. In Tudor times, it was still the main part of an ordinary person’s diet. It was basically a vegetable soup, flavoured with herbs and thickened with oats. 

Ordinary people would not have been able to afford much meat, so they would rely on this soup as their staple diet together with bread and cheese. Occasionally meat bones or fish would be added when available.

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Medieval Monday – Perre

A Medieval sidedish resipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingPerre_post

Take green peas, and boil them in a pot; And when they are broken, draw the broth a good quantity through a strainer into a pot, And sit it on the fire; and take onions and parsley, and hew them small together, And cast them thereto; And take powder of Cinnamon and pepper and cast thereto, and let boil; And take vinegar and powder of ginger, and cast thereto; And then take Saffron and salt, a little quantity, and cast thereto; And take fair pieces of pandemaine, or else of such tender bread, and cut it in fair morsels, and cast thereto; And serve it so forth.

From Harleian MS. 4016, Volume II

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Medieval Monday – Powder Fort

A medieval spice mix recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingPowder fort_post

The girl who runs Let Hem Boyle writes: Powder Fort also called powder forte, poudour fort, strong powder. Spice mixtures was very common in medieval cooking. “Forme of Cury” for example has lots of recipes that calls for powder douce or powder fort spice mixtures.

You will find lots of different versions of powder fort on internet and in books. The medieval recipes doesn’t usually tell the exact measures of the spices used in spice mixtures or what kind of spices to use. One way to look for the perfect combination of these spice mixtures is to read the recipes and collect the most suitable spices from other recipes in the same source. If you don’t have access to some of the spices, that doesn’t matter!

Powder fort is a strong and warm spice mixture.

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Medieval Monday – Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

A meat free fasting day tart recipe found on cookit.e2bn.org
headingMedieval Monday - Ember Day Tarts / Emberdags Terter

Four times every year in the Catholic calendar, there were “Ember Days” – consisting of a Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday – when meat was forbidden. Cheese and eggs, however, were allowed. An ‘Ember Day Tart’ therefore was a filling dish served instead of meat on these fasting days. The tarts in the recipe are a little like a sweet quiche.

The recipe uses galingale, it is well worth finding some as its aromatic taste is not easily replaced. You can use ginger as a substitute but this will give heat rather than a more rounded flavour.

The recipe was originally written down as follows:

‘Tart in embre day: take and parboile onynons; presse out the water & hewe hem smale;take brede & bray it in a mortar,and temper it up with ayren; do perto butter, safron, spice and salt and corans & a ltel sugar with powdor douce, and bake it in a trap,& serve it forth.’

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Medieval Monday – Hykonys In Bruette / Hykony I Bruette

A chicken with a spicy sauce recipe from 1450 found at
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Heading

Medieval Monday - Hykonys In Bruette / Hykony I Bruette

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: You can use the whole chicken with giblets if you desire. If you do so, chop the chicken into quarter. About 400 g chicken with the bones should be enough per person. I used legs because they are cheap and easy to get hold of.

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Lumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

A fourteenth century recipe found on Let Hem Boyle
Medieval Monday_headingLumbard Mustard / Lumbardisk Sennep

saaraSaara whe runs Let Hem Boyle writes: I have to say that I love mustard! All different kinds of… it can be strong, mild, vinegary, spiced.. I do like them all. Making mustard for an event has been a plan for long time, but I haven’t done it until Midwinter Feast. This recipe is great! You can make it beforehand and store it in the fridge. It will be good stored in fridge for couple of weeks.

Take mustard seeds and waishe it and drye it in an ovene, grynde it drye. Farse it thurgh a farse. Clarifie hony with wyne and vynegur and stere it wel togedrer and make it thikke ynowz. And whan thou wilt spende thereof make it tnynne with wyne.

Original recipe from Forme of Cury, 1390

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Medieval Monday – Arbolettys

A medieval spicy egg dish recipefound on
One Year and Thousand Eggs Medieval Monday_headingMedieval Monday – Arbolettys

Saara who runs One Year and Thousand Eggs writes: This egg dish is kind of scrambled eggs with herbs. It is very good with toasted bread.

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Medieval Monday – 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16de Århundre

A medieval fruit paste recipe found on Turnspit & Table
Medieval Monday - 16th Century Genoese Quince Paste / Genovesisk Kvedepasta fra det 16ende Århundre

Kim who runs ‘Turnspit & Table‘ writes: Quince Paste is the ancestor of modern marmalade, people have been preserving quinces for a very long time. The Greeks and Romans packed them tightly into honey to make melomeli or cooked it down to a paste with honey and pepper, often recommending them as treatments for complaints of the stomach.

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Medieval Monday – Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

A historic pie recipe found on mediumaevum.tumblr.comHeadingMedieval Monday - Pork Pie / Pai Med Svinekjøtt

Tak fayre porke y-broylid, & grynd it smal with yolkys of Eyroun; than take Pepir, Gyngere, & grynd it smal, & melle it with-al, & a lytel hony, & floryssche thin cofyns with-ynne & with-owte, & hele hem with thin ledys, & late hem bake, & serue forth – Original recipe

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Medieval Monday – Soul Cakes / Sjelekaker

A delicious cake recipe found on Lavender & Lovage
Medieval Monday_headingSoul Cakes_post

Karen who runs  “Lavender & Lovage” writes: These little cakes are a cross between a biscuit and a scone and were traditionally made for All Soul’s Day, which is on the 2nd of November. Packed with currants and mixed spice, these lovely little cakes are delicious with an afternoon cuppa.

This recipe is adapted from “A Calendar of Feasts – Cattern Cakes and Lace” by Julia Jones and Barbara Deer.

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Medieval Monday – Hanoney

A medieval omelet recipe found on
One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingHanoney_post

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Medieval Monday – Sauge – Chicken with Sage Sauce / Kylling med Salviesaus

A 15th Century recipe found on One Year and Thousand Eggs
Medieval Monday_headingSauge – Chicken with Sage Sauce_post

A recipe from From the 15th Century cook book Harleian MS. 279, Volume I, found on One Year and Thousand Eggs a treasure chest of a blog for anyone interested in medieval recipes.

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Medieval Monday – 15th Century Roasted Milk / 1400talls Stekt Melk

A mysterious 15th Century recipe found on Tunspit & Table
headingMedieval Monday - 15th Century Roasted Milk / 1400talls Stekt Melk

Kim who runs ‘Tunspit & Table‘ writes: Yes, you read that right, it says Roasted Milk. You may be wondering, as did I, exactly how one roasts milk. Well, it turns out it’s not really roasted at all, but you make a kind of set custard, slice it up and fry it. The trick of course was to get the right proportion of milk to eggs to make custard when there are no amounts given in the original recipe.

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