Persian Pilaf / Persisk Pilaf

An exotic rice dish found in “Ris og Pasta” in the “Menu –
International Madleksikon” series publisert by Lademann i 1978

Persian Pilaf / Persisk Pilaf

Pilaf is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth. In some cases, the rice may attain its brown or golden colour by first being sauteed lightly in oil before the addition of broth. Cooked onion, other vegetables, as well as a mix of spices, may be added. Depending on the local cuisine, it may also contain meat, fish, vegetables, pasta, and dried fruit.

Pilaf and similar dishes are common to Balkan, Middle Eastern, Caucasian, Central and South Asian, East African, Latin American, and Caribbean cuisines. It is a staple food and a national dish in Afghan, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Balochi, Bangladeshi, Bukharan Jewish, Cretan, Indian, Iranian, Kazakh, Kurdish, Kyrgyz, Pakistani, Swahili (Kenyan, Tanzanian-Zanzibari), Tajik, Turkish, Uyghur, and Uzbek cuisines.

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Kinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

A popular Lebanese breakfast dish fould on sbs.com.auKinafa – Traditional Lebanese Sweet Breakfast / Tradisjonelle Libanesiske Søt Frokokst

Kinafa is a traditional Lebanese sweet that’s popular for breakfast, mainly on Sundays. Usually the whole family gathers to enjoy this warm dish for a lazy and rich breakfast.

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Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

A classic Egyptian recipe from “God Mat Fra Hele Verden” (Delicious Food From All The World) published by Schibsted in 1971
Felfel Bil Roz – Egyptian Stuffed Peppers / Egyptiske Fylte Paprika

Stuffed vegetables are known from throughout the Balkans and most other places in the Middle East. Here’s the Egyptian version.

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Lavash – Middle Eastern Bread / Brød fra Midtøsten

A recipe for a soft flatbread found on about.com/food/Lavash Middle Eastern Bread_aboutfood_post

traditional badge ethnic speciality_flatMost modern food specialists claim that lavash originated in Armenia, whilst others state that it probably originated in Middle East. According to Peter Reinhart, “Lavash, though usually called Armenian flatbread, also has Iranian roots and is now eaten throughout the Middle East and around the world”

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Koussa Mehché – Stuffed Courgettes / Fylte Courgetter

A recipe from the Middle East found in “Kulinarisk Pass”
(Culinary Passport) published by Tupperware in 1970.

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In context

The courgette is a variety of cucurtbit, which means it’s from the same family as cucumber, squash and melon. It is the most popular Courgettes-2_crvegetable of the squash family, being extremely versatile, tender and easy to cook. Just don’t boil them! They have a deep green skin with firm pale flesh and are also known as zucchini.

Availability Courgettes are at their best from June until September. Choose the best Choose small courgettes that are firm to touch with a glossy, unblemished skin. Avoid soft, squishy courgettes.

Prepare it Courgettes do not need peeling. Slice off each end and prepare as recipe directs. It’s best not to boil, as they will become mushy and lose their flavour. Instead lightly sauté in butter or oil and a small amount of water.

Store it Refrigerate in a vegetable storage bag in the crisper compartment and eat within 2-3 days.

Cook it Try courgettes sliced thinly and eaten raw, cooked on a griddle, in a stir fry, or fried in a light batter as chips.

Alternatives Try squash or marrow.

Felfela Bil Roz / Stuffed Peppers/ Fylte Paprika

An Egyptian dish found in “God Mat fra Hele Verden” (Nice Food From All Over The World) published by Schibsted in 1971felfel bil roz_post

Stuffed vegetables are common throughout the Balkans and several places in the Middle East. Here is an Egyptian version.

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