Making Butter at Home / Slik Lager Du Smør Hjemme

A great how-to-do-it recipe found on
A Taste of History with Joyce White
Making Butter at Home_post

Everything’s Better with Butter – Making Butter
at Home Using 21st Century Equipment

Joyce White who runs A Taste of History with Joyce White writes: One of the first historic cooking skills I learned was how to make butter in a crock churn.  Until I made butter myself, I never understood the steps that are necessary to make sure the butter is the best it can be.

Don’t have a proper butter churn?  No problem. Follow the simple steps below to make butter in your 21st century home kitchen using modern equipment and heavy cream.

000_england_recipe_marker_ny000_norway_recipe_marker_ny

The History of Condiments

condiments_01Since ancient times people have used condiments to enhance their food. The first condiment was salt. Salt has always been used both as a preservative and to enhance the flavor of food. Vinegar has also been used since ancient times. Its name is probably derived from the French words vin aiger meaning sour wine. (Vinegar was used as a medicine as well as a food).

The Romans liked condiments and they made many sauces for their food. One of the most common was a fish sauce called liquamen. The Romans also grew mustard and they introduced it into the parts of Europe they conquered. They also made mint sauce.

condiments_02In the Middle Ages mustard was a popular condiment in Europe. At first English mustard consisted of coarse powder and it was not very strong. However in 1720 a Mrs Clements of Durham began making a much smoother mustard powder. When mixed with water to make paste it was very hot but it proved to be popular and Durham became a center of the mustard industry. (For centuries mustard was used as a medicine as well as a food).

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries new condiments were invented. Pesto sauce was invented in 16th century Italy. Furthermore new sauces were invented in the 17th century including bechamel and chasseur. Chutney comes from India. It was first exported to England in the 17th century. Soy sauce, which was invented in China reached Europe in the 17th century and by the mid-18th century it was popular in Britain.

condiments_03According to one story a French chef first made mayonnaise in 1756. However there are many stories about where it comes from. Hollandaise sauce was also first recorded in the mid-18th century. Ketchup began life as a Chinese fish sauce called ke-tsiap. The name was gradually changed to ketchup and in Britain people added other ingredients instead of fish. In the 18th century they began adding tomatoes. Sauces similar to tartar sauce were made in the Middle Ages but ‘modern’ tartar sauce was first made in the 1800s

condiments_04In the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution condiments began to be mass-produced in factories. Tomato ketchup was a best seller and HP sauce was invented at the end of the 19th century. Meanwhile Worcester sauce was invented in Worcester in 1835 by John Lea and William Perrins. Horseradish sauce went on sale in bottles in the USA around 1860. Salad cream was invented in 1914.

As well as sauces people have also looked for ways to sweeten their food. Since the time of the Ancient Egyptians and probably before people have kept bees for honey. Over condiments_05the centuries honey was very valuable and it was sometimes used as a currency or it was given as a tribute to a conqueror. Since ancient times people have also made an alcoholic drink called mead from honey.

Sugar cane first grew in South Asia. Later the Arabs and Europeans grew sugar cane. At the end of the 15th century sugar cane was taken to the New World. Sugar was first made from sugar beet in the 18th century. A German chemist called Andreas Marggraf was the first person to make sugar from beet in 1747. Saccharine was invented in 1879 by Constantine Fahlberg.

Text from localhistories.org

How to Make ‘Sun-Dried’ Tomatoes…in the Oven! / Hvordan Lage ‘Soltørkede’ Tomater… i Ovnen!

A great ’how to’ recipe found on about.com/food/How to Make 'Sun-Dried' Tomatoes...in the Oven!_italianfood.about_post

Drying is a traditional Italian way to preserve an abundance of ripe summer tomatoes so that they can be enjoyed throughout the rest of the year, particularly in the southern Italian regions of Calabria and Puglia.

The store-bought sun-dried tomatoes I had tasted were a bit leathery and tough, with not much flavor. They seemed like a faded, desiccated memory of a tomato, rather than a fragrant, intensified taste of summer days. Homemade sun-dried tomatoes are another thing entirely: fragrant and chewy but not tough, with complex, concentrated tomato flavor and a slight sweetness.

Although it’s not difficult, the trouble with making them at home is that many of us do not have the abundant outdoor space required, or the time, or perhaps we lack consistent, strong sunshine, or live in highly polluted cities or bug-infested areas where perhaps drying food outdoors is not the best idea.

The solution? You can easily dry them in your oven.

000_recipe_eng000_recipe_nor