Honey and Mustard Sauce / Honning- og Sennepssaus

A medieval spicy sauce recipe found at cookit.e2bn.org
Medieval Monday_headingHoney and Mustard Sauce_post

Mustard was much used by the Romans and later was very popular with the Anglo Saxons. It grew locally and so was cheap. It could be used to makes sauces for meat and fish as well as dressings for salads. It helped to preserve other foods as well as having healthy properties of its own.

The sauces were generally made from a mixture of ground mustard seeds, vinegar, wine and often honey, with spices or other flavourings added according to what people liked.

They could then be stored for several weeks. Mustard’s ‘hotness’ gets less after it is mixed and kept for a few days, which may account for the strength of the sauces often made – which would be much too hot for most of us today.

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Salsa Verde – Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

A classic Continental cold sauce recipe found in
“God Mat fra Hele Verden” (Nice Food From All Over the Word)
published by Schibsted in 1971

Salsa Verde - Green Sauce / Grønn Saus

One usually think of this sauce as a typical Italian specialty, but as it turns out also in Germany is it known, as a specialty comming from Frankfurt.

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Cornwall Toast / Cornwalltoast

A delicious toast recipe found in “Matglede Som Aldri Før”
(Joy of Food Like Never Before) published by
Skaninavisk Press as in 1977

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French Veal Chops with Calvados / Fransk Kalvekoteletter med Calvados

A great dinner recipe from “The Best of International Cooking”
published by Hamlyn in 1984

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In context: Apple orchards and brewers are mentioned as far back as the 8th century by Charlemagne. The first known Norman distillation was carried out by “Lord” de Gouberville in 1553, and the guild for cider distillation was created about 50 years later in 1606. In the 17th century, the traditional cider farms expanded, but taxation and prohibition of cider brandies were enforced elsewhere than Brittany, Maine, and Normandy.

calvados posterThe area called “Calvados” was created after the French Revolution, but eau de vie de cidre was already called calvados in common usage. In the 19th century, output increased with industrial distillation and the working class fashion for café-calva. When a phylloxera outbreak in the last quarter of the 19th century devastated the vineyards of France and Europe, calvados experienced a “golden age”.

During World War I, cider brandy was requisitioned for use in armaments due to its alcohol content. The appellation contrôlée regulations officially gave calvados a protected name in 1942.

After the war, many cider houses and distilleries were reconstructed, mainly in the Pays d’Auge. Many of the traditional farmhouse structures were replaced by modern agriculture with high output. The Calvados appellation system was revised in 1984 and 1996. Pommeau got its recognition in 1991; in 1997, an appellation for Domfront with 30% pears was created.

Crazy Bread with Marinara Sauce / Crazy Brød med Marinarasaus

A recipe from Saveur’s test kitchen found on saveur.com
Crazy Bread with Marinara Sauce / Crazy Brød med Marinarasaus

Add a little “kick” to this homemade version of Little Caesar’s “Crazy Bread” by sprinkling on a little chile flake before dunking in hot marinara.

Test kitchen director Farideh Sadeghin grew up eating Little Caesar’s pizza with her family and friends, and was particularly fond of the crazy bread on the menu, thus inspiring her to make this homemade version. She loves to sprinkle it with chile flakes before dipping it in hot marinara sauce.

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Medieval Monday – A Bold 12th Century Sauce for the Lords / En Kraftig Saus for Lorder fra det 12. Århundre

A recipe from the 12th Century Found on
A Taste of History with Joyce WhiteMedieval Monday_heading
A Bold 12th Century Sauce for the Lords_post

How to Prepare a Sauce for the Lords
and How Long it Lasts

One takes cloves and nutmeg, cardamom, pepper, cinnamon—that is canel—and ginger, all in equal amounts, except that there should be as much canel as all the other spices; and add twice as much toasted bread as of everything else, and grind them all together, and blend with strong vinegar, and place it in a cask. This is a lordly sauce, and it is good for half a year.

Joyce White who runs A Taste of History with Joyce White writes about the recipe above: This is another recipe from “Libellus de arte coquinaria”, An Early Northern Cookery Book, edited by Rudolph Grewe and Constance B. Hieatt in 2001, a translation of the oldest known collections of European recipes written sometime during the Middle Ages. The original text of the cookbook is believed to be lost, but there are four collections of recipes (codices) that appear to all come from it. They are written in the local vernacular languages of northern Europe: Danish, Icelandic and Low German. There are about 35 recipes contained in these four separate codices, and the oldest might date back as far as the 12th century.

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1700s Mushroom Ketchup / 1700talls Soppketchup

An exiting recipe found onWorld Turn’d Upside Down
a blog you would not want to miss if you are at
all interested in historic recipes

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Stephanie Ann Farra who runs ‘World Turn’d Upside Down‘ writes: Mushroom ketchup was something I’ve been wanting to make for a long time. I love the fact that this was a common sauce so different from the ketchup we use today. In the early 1700s, ketchup was introduced to English explorers by the people of Singapore and Malaysia. Originally a sauce for fish, ketchup was made out of walnuts, oysters or mushrooms and was similar to soy sauce. The English expanded the use of the sauce and it became popular for fish and meat dishes.

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Real Mint Sauce / Ekte Engelsk Myntesaus

A classic British recipe found on bbc.com/food/
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A thin savoury sauce made from chopped mint, vinegar and sugar, traditionally served in England as an accompaniment to roast lamb. Mint grows so freely that once you know the trick you never need buy mint sauce again.

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